Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 130, No. 18, November 3

Another Tale of Two Cities
Bilbao and Los Angeles open daring showplaces for art--one for modern, the other for old masters. What a nice way to start a century. THE MOTHER SHIPS HAVE landed! Aliens are poised to conquer the countryside in northern Spain and southern California....
Big
Last year 'Big' lost $10 million. This year it's back. ON THE WAY TO THE OPENING-night party for the Broadway musical "Big" last year, John Weidman, the show's book writer, got into a limo accident that sent his entire family to the hospital. It...
Bigger, Wilder, Farther
Patagonia's remote beauty lures celebs south TOM BROKAW HAS ALWAYS had a passion for end-of-the-world Edens. Over the years, the NBC News anchor has safaried in East Africa, hiked the Nepalese Himalayas and ridden horses across the steppes of Outer...
Brain Boosters
Americans are gobbling an array of natural memory potions. A new study suggests one of them--an herb called ginkgo biloba--might help. GREG AREDE WAS 26 AND FRESH out of Harvard Business School when he decided his memory needed sharpening. Last...
Breaking Windows
The government charges that Microsoft isn't fighting fairly in the browser wars. Is Janet Reno's ultimate goal to bust up the mighty software giant? BY STEVEN LEVY BILL GATES WASN'T ACTING like a man who had just been given the news that the government...
Diamonds Are Forever
A museum show explores the gem's many facets DIAMONDS ARE THE ESSENCE OF PUNITY in Hindu myth and a girl's best friend on Broadway. That range of symbolism is one reason George Harlow, curator of gems and minerals at the American Museum of Natural...
Ditch the Calculators: Letting Children Punch Numbers into a Machine Does Not Add Up to Learning Math
Letting children punch numbers into a machine does not add up to learning math I SIGH INWARDLY AS I WATCH YET ANOTHER STUDENT, THIS one a ninth grader, struggle with an advanced math problem that requires simple multiplication. He mentally grapples...
Friends, Brothers, Heretics
Patriarch Bartholomew labels the Catholics FOR THE LAST 30 YEARS, REPRESENTATIVES of the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches have been trying to repair the breach between the world's two largest bodies of Christian believers. But last week,...
Glasgow: Throwing off London's Yoke
The city's new art scene reflects Scotland's spirit of independence--and the world is taking notice NONE OF THE ARTISTS HELPING fellow conceptualist Simon Starling install his exhibition at Glasgow's publicly funded Transmission gallery is yet 30....
Health and Fitness
HEALTH ON THE WEB Unprecedented opportunity if us with caution' The Internet surfers' unquenchable thirst for health-related information is creating a new genre of patient empowerment and a new dynamic between physician and patient. The upside:...
Hong Kong Ain't Sheboygan: Don't Buy the Doomsday Scenario That Southeast Asian Turmoil Will Have a Strong Effect on the U.S. Economy
Don't buy the doomsday scenario that Southeast Asian turmoil will have a strong effect on the U.S. economy THERE'S NOTHING WE IN the news biz like more than a good panic, especially the financial kind. It's exciting, it's fun to watch and it gives...
It's Gonna Be a Long Week
Protesters plan to give Jiang a dose of America's rambunctious democracy THE EDITORIAL IN THE HARVARD Crimson begins, "He is an evil man, leading a truly evil empire." And that was the piece supporting Jiang Zemin's speech at the university on Saturday....
Lessons in How to Say I'm Sorry
Albert should study other fallen celebs THIS WHOLE MARV ALBERT THING IS nothing new for Larry King. "I've interviewed a lot of people who have had ups and downs,' he says. Michael Milken, the fallen financier turned full-time philanthropist, did...
Making Child Care Macho: As She Turns 50, Hillary Clinton Seizes the Chance to Take Her Pet Issue to the Big Time
As she turns 50, Hillary Clinton seizes the chance to take her pet issue to the big time FORGET THE PRESIDENT'S GENITALS. I'M more interested in the genitals of an issue. I'm wondering if child care can develop some cojones and move out of the ladles'...
Modern Quandary: Is It Dead, or Is It Memorex?
JFK, Di, LBJ, just the way we never knew them DEAD MEN, WROTE THE ENGLISH poet John Dryden, tell no tales. But this was before the advent of electronic recording devices. These days, the dead won't shut up. In movies, books, CDs and newly released...
Nixon off the Record
For the first time, in newly transcribed tapes, hear how Nixon set up his own fall. It's 1971, and he wants dirt on the Democrats even if it means burglary. His order: 'Get it done.' FOR RICHARD NIXON, THE wedding of his eldest daughter, Tricia,...
Secrets of the Ivy League
A former admissions official at Dartmouth tells all THIS IS THE TIME OF YEAR WHEN tens of thousands of the nation's top high-school seniors labor over applications to Ivy League and other elite colleges. They're doing their best to impress the admissions...
So Who Was That Guy?
An offer captured on White House video helps unravel a Puerto Rican developer s web of ties in Washington THEIR CONVERSATION--A BRIEF Exchange that appears to have been recorded accidentally-shows up on the videotape of a White House coffee on Dec....
Stamps of Approval for the New Millennium
ONE HUNDRED AND fifty years ago the United States issued its first two postage stamps: a brown five-cent stamp bearing the likeness of Benjamin Franklin and a black 10-center depicting George Washington. Actually, our first 11 stamps had either George...
Standing Stone
Paul challenges Wagner with his new symphony PAUL MCCARTNEY'S SYMPHONY IS so ambitious, with such grandiose themes and even grander intentions, that you need German to describe it. The word: Gesamtkunstwerk, Wagner's concept for a total work of...
The Civil Warriors
A mini-series on Lewis and Clark, ultimate '90s heroes THEY WERE THE FIRST American heroes after the Revolutionary War, and the models for all those who came after: fearless, supremely competent and self-reliant, even while living off a government...
The Golden Fears: Chicken Littles Say the Boomers Aren't Saving
Chicken Littles say the boomers aren't saving. By Linda Stern EVERY SEVEN SECONDS FOR THE next 16 years, another baby boomer will turn 50. And with almost the same frequency, someone somewhere, will release anther study telling us how woefully unprepared...
The Myth of Cinderella
The heroine is black. Prince Charming isn't. The new TV version of Hollywood's hottest fairy tale sends a sister to the royal ball--and raises some tricky questions about happily ever after. FOR GENERATIONS, black women have been the societal embodiment...
The Return of the Undead: A New Wave of Slasher Movies Is Making It Big
A new wave of slasher movies is making it big ARE ARE HORROR MOVIES RISING FROM the dead? That's the question Hollywood is asking after the recent $15.8 on opening of "I Know What You Did Last Summer" and last Christmas's surprise hit, "Scream."...
The Wilsons
Brian Wilson's daughters have new stories to sing THE BREAKUP OF WILSON PHILLIPS was one of those monumental, earth-shattering experiences that wrench the heart and make you wonder if life can ever be the same. Well, at least it was for Carnie and...
Troubled Waters
Behind the lines in the U.S.-Canada salmon war It also conjures up outlaws. In 1901 Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, the notorious Wild West bank and train robbers, fled the United States and settled on a sheep farm outside the town of Esquel,...
Trumping the President
In IRS reform, a savvy GOP steals the spotlight FOR THE REPUBLICANS, IT WAS A rare instance of trumping the master. Bill Clinton, a wizard of political timing, has been one-upping GOP leaders for years by seizing their issues just as they ripened...
When Galaxies Collide: With Its Latest Dazzling Picture from Deep Space, the Hubble Telescope Has Brought Another Cosmic Mystery Down to Earth
GAZING AT THE night sky, at the lights that seem eternally glued onto the black of space, a star-watcher would never guess at the violence that lurks within the starry seas of tranquillity. But out beyond our solar system, beyond even our Milky Way,...
When the Shoe Fits
The blonde with the tiny feet has an amazing hold on our psyches. THE STUDIO GAVE US brave Pocahontas and scholarly Belle; they gave us a mermaid hell-bent on a career change. But ever since her debut, in 1950, Disney's Cinderella has been the fairy-tale...