Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 131, No. 14, April 6

A Brand-New Chapter
In a surprise deal, the German giant Bertelsmann buys the last word in words, Random House No one saw it coming. Last fall the German media conglomerate Bertelsmann AG quietly approached billionaire S. I. (Si) Newhouse Jr. about buying Random House,...
Africa Dreams
On his historic trip, Bill Clinton played to the folks at home white he offered encouragement and advice to his hosts. But for a continent struggling to move from dictatorship and poverty to democracy and free markets, more is needed. Bill Clinton...
A Star Image Blurs
When Kodak's George Fisher was hailed as a savior-CEO, he didn't buy the hype. Now that his turnaround has stalled, he has lots of company. If there were a mount rushmore of today's business icons, George Fisher's face would be on it. In the last...
Checking Your Vessels
Are you headed for a heart attack despite your tow cholesterol? A $400 test makes it easier to find out. When your cholesterol is in the stratosphere and slicing bread makes your chest ache, you know yon have a problem. Unfortunately, arterial disease...
Download Some Manners, Upgrade Your Career
Uncouth techno-types learn to behave like grown-ups at this Silicon Valley finishing school The modern silicon valley gearhead sure needs to know a lot of things: there's writing arcane computer code, e-mailing John Doerr about lunch, how to spend...
Fighting Back - with Style
Editor Lis Tilberis tells of glitter, glamour and, most of all, survival Liz Tilberis begins her story on a night in 1993 when her life seemed as glossy and perfect as the images in the magazine she edits, Harper's Bazaar. She was 46 and had been...
From Raunch to Romance
A new generation of R&B singers are finally getting in touch with their sensitive side Growing up, Gerald Levert, had a hard time listening to his father's sappy love songs. As the lead singer of the '70s group the O'Jays, Eddie Levert used his...
Harnessing the Hysteria
As the shots in Jonesboro fade, let's channel our grief into the larger cause of helping kids One of the most shocking things about the Jonesboro massacre is that it's still shocking--that America's bottomless capacity for violence has not fully...
Her Father's Keeper
Yeltsin's daughter is his closest confidante In Boris Yeltsin's quicksand Kremlin, Ministers and Advisors rise and fall, but Tatyana Dyachenko is always on solid ground. The president's younger daughter is his nurse, nanny and most trusted counselor....
Is This Any Way to Run a Country?
Boris Yeltsin has sacked his entire cabinet. More bizarre behavior, or a real effort at reform? Russia's President had coyly suggested for months that he knew exactly who should succeed him in 2000, the year the country is scheduled to hold its next...
It's Time for 'Teletubbies.' (Children's Show from the UK)
Already a smash in the U.K., a new kids' show invades PBS They are a sensation. They are a scandal. They are "Teletubbies." Po, Dipsy, Laa-Laa and Tinky Winky are futuristic toddlers who stroll among the flowers of Teletubbyland. They bump bellies....
'Passion in Every Pitch.' (Boston Red Sox Pitcher Pedro Martinez)
In Boston as baseball's highest-paid player, Pedro Martinez is out of the spotlight no longer At Pedro Martinez's first major-league spring training, the scrawny young Dominican was sometimes mistaken for the team batboy. Now, six seasons later,...
Recasting the Past
Novelist are clamoring to rewrite history Charles Frazier may be historical fiction's latest poster boy, but he's had a lot of competition for the title. Last year Don DeLillo, Thomas Pynchon and Caleb Carr also produced best-selling historical fiction....
The All-Day, All-Night, Global, No-Trouble Job Search
Jennifer Meltzer, A human-resources manager at Tiffany & Co., was in a quandary. She ad two corporate sales positions to fill--one in Austin, Texas, the other in Seattle--but didn't want to spend the crown jewels finding the right applicants....
The Children Who Would Be King
When the nation lost its modern-day prophet, they lost their dad. Burdened by a famous name, they've struggled to find themselves in a world where everyone else thinks they know who the Kings should be. Behind Martin Luther King Inc. As His Father...
The Magic of Touch
A weekly massage may seem an indulgence, but new research suggests it can have major health benefits Michelle huddle trims the bones and gristle from 330 chicken breasts an hour, five hours a day, on a packing line at Wampler Foods. That's a lot...
The Man Who Fired Himself
Garry Shandling, and Larry Sanders, pull a Seinfeld It's a classic vignette of show-business nastiness, the kind that viewers have come to expect from "The Larry Sanders Show." In this episode, shown last month, the talk show's deeply neurotic host...
The Pinnacle of Success
`Cold Mountain' is leading the charge of literary novels that exalt the past. Meanwhile, its author Charles Frazier is enduring a wild ride through the celebrity machinery of the '90s. The word on author Charles Frazier is that he doesn't like to...
The War over King's Legacy
Thirty years ago, on the eve of his murder, Martin Luther Jr.'s Dream was turning dark. Worried about poverty and Vietnam, he was growing more radical--and that, his family says, is why he was killed. Was the real King a saint, a subversive--or both?...
Why Children Turn Violent
Movies, videogames, loose guns, alienation--there's no one reason kids kill, but there are warning signs. We're used to seeing greed, Jealousy and dashed hopes turn adults into murderers. But why would boys of 11 and 13 spray bullets into a crowd...
Women Behaving Badly
Infamous prodigy Elizabeth Wurtzel caught the wave with `Prozac Nation.' Now she's back with `Bitch,' a rousing defense of female rage. The famously depressed Elizabeth Wurtzel arrives late for lunch in Manhattan, exhausted and clearly unhappy. Even...