Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 23, December 7

A Literary Sorceress: A Dark British Kids' Book Bewitches the U.S
Harry potter is an 11-year-oldorphan who escapes his cruel aunt and uncle when he's sent to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. At Hogwarts, where the school motto is Drago Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus (Never Tickle a Sleeping Dragon), Harry...
A Poverty Pioneer's Woes: Charges of Drugs and Nepotism Roil a Model Project
Mildred Hailey, 65, has been called "the Mother Teresa of public housing." Twenty-five years ago she started a movement to give control of housing projects back to the tenants. When she took over her own project, Bromley-Heath in Boston, the place...
A Real Buddy Picture: Two Young Friends Make an Adorable New Comedy about Passion and Prep School. Go, 'Rushmore'!
You think you know a person. wes Anderson and Owen Wilson have been friends for nearly 10 years. After graduating from the University of Texas, they wrote a caper flick called "Bottle Rocket." Anderson directed the movie. Wilson turned in a hilarious...
A Recipe for Disaster
By putting too much faith in one team of reformers, America only added to Russia's economic mess Even seven years af-ter the fall of the "Evil Empire," Russia has continued to supply the world with plenty of bad guys. Unreconstructed communists,...
Death Wish
After a videotaped mercy killing, Jack Kevorkian is charged with murder in a battle over the right to die. Has he at last gone too far? Jack Kevorkian had vowed to spend Thanksgiving starving himself in a jail cell. Instead, after a judge set him...
Here Come the Germans: Big U.S. Deals Show They're Playing the Global Game
With their stock market comfortably elevated, their belts comfortably loose and a few flecks of Thanksgiving gravy still on their stovetops, American business people had even less reason than usual last weekend to think about European monetary union....
Hog Heaven and Hell: The Further Adventures of Babe Are Darker, Deeper and Very Inventive. and Not for the Very Young
Babe: Pig in the City has already taken a certain amount of abuse for what it isn't. It isn't "Babe." And why should it be? The original was complete unto itself. Not content to repeat himself, George ("Mad Max") Miller, who produced the first and...
'I'm Not There When I'm Burned in Effigy'
Soros talks about the chances of recession--and what it's like to be bashed as an evil speculator With u.s. markets breathing a sigh of relief, George Soros sat down with Newsweek and explained why he's still bearish. The trader who's been called...
Let 1,000 Flowers Bloom: Seeds of Change, 140 Million Years Old
Paleontologists working at a hot fossil site know to bring their wallets: farmers in Beipiao in northeast China happily dig up specimens and sell them for a few hundred dollars. Last year, researchers from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Paleontology...
Living in the Shadows of Giants
What the men and women who fought World War II and built the peace could teach us about elevating the tone of the times. In the spring of 1984, i went to normandy to prepare an NBC documentary on the 40th anniversary of D-Day. I knew the history;...
Multiplication Tables: Seeing Double-And Triple-In Class
Students at big Ridge Elementary School in Chattanooga, Tenn., are used to seeing double--or even triple --in the classroom. Their public school counts five sets of twins and four sets of triplets among its 565 students. It's sometimes tough to tell...
Not Just Lamb Curry: Varied and Refined, 'Haute' Indian Arrives
Chef floyd cardoz says his favorite place in Tabla, a New York restaurant opening next week, is a kitchen cubbyhole known as the spice room. "This is where I come to think," he says happily, gazing at shelves lined with whole spices. The other day...
Not Today, Not Tomorrow
In 1980, four American women were murdered in El Salvador. On his return there, a reporter finds that the case is not yet closed. Eighteen years ago this week,three American nuns and a religious volunteer were abducted, raped and murdered in El...
Prohibition Revisited?
Sick of bars and liquor stores on every corner--and the problems they bring--Chicago neighborhoods go dry South michigan av-enue in Chicago has seen much better days. The commercial strip from 107th to 117th Street has some rundown mom-and-pop stores...
'Psycho' Analysis: Director Gus Van Sant Defends His Controversial Decision to Remake Hitchcock's Classic Shocker. All He's Added Is Color
Gus Van Sant has been hearing one question put to him a lot these days. The question is, WHY? Why would anyone--least of all the idiosyncratic director of "Drugstore Cowboy" and "Good Will Hunting"--want to do a remake of "Psycho"? Not, mind you, a...
Raising Spiritual Children
Most parents still want to make sure their kids grow up with God. But today they often need extra help to show them the way. Paul Castro is only 4 years old, but he has already started his spiritual quest. His parents, Bob and Dawnelle, don't belong...
Real Men Don't Shop Online: Cybershopping? Bah, Humbug. A Defense of the Subtle Charms of Hoofing It, Braving the Crowds-And Embracing the Season
What was the first christmas present ever or- dered through cyberspace? You could make a case, I guess, for gold, frankincense and myrrh, delivered with the help of the crude but effective Star-in-the-East search engine. But my own candidate is a goose....
Should We Go Private? Some Questions for the Reformers Who Want Personal Social Security Investment Accounts
It's said that a lot of great arguments are spoiled by a bore who actually knows what he's talking about. Not that I'd ever tag as a bore Dallas Salisbury, head of the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) in Washington, D.C. He's a skeptic and...
Stuck in the Scandal Ditch: Everyone Wants to Move On-But Can't Figure out How
Paul mchale doesn't hide his disdain for Bill Clinton. The Pennsylvania congressman was the first House Democrat to call for the president's resignation. But last week McHale had an epiphany. Walking into his kitchen, he saw Saddam Hussein on the news....
'The Hurt Can No Longer Be Ignored'
The extradition case against General Pinochet forces Chile to confront his legacy, says the widow of a coup victim. I can feel no joy at the british house of lords' deci- sion last week that Gen. Augusto Pinochet is not protected by sovereign immunity...
The Return of Standard Oil?
Exxon and Mobil may merge. But this is no monopoly. It sounds like a bad movie: Night of the Living Dead Monopolist. The spirit of old John D. Rockefeller rises from the grave to resurrect the most infamous "trust" of all time. Exxon and Mobil,...
The Secret of Aging
I'm graying, overweight and almost 50. But if I'm slowing down, why is time speeding up? They never warn you. the old ones. there should be volumes written on it. There should be billboards proclaiming it on every street corner. Government pamphlets...
The 'Veggies' That Kids Actually Like
A bumper crop of animated Bible videos Nebby k. nezzer is one dastardly cucumber. The animated villain of one installment of the "VeggieTales" video series, Nezzer is the owner of a chocolate-bunny factory who tries to lead his loyal workers Rack,...
Thinking Differently: Brain Scans Give New Hope for Diagnosing ADHD
Even in a classroom of 30 preteens, it's not hard to spot the one with problems. He's staring out the window instead of listening, or tearing around the room instead of finishing that art project. But is he merely rambunctious, or is he one of the...
What Courts Are Teaching
When a court does the right thing for the wrong reason, it does the wrong thing Following the U.S. supreme court's logic to a conclusion that the court flinched from reaching 12 years ago, Georgia's Supreme Court last week struck down that state's...
Why the Big Bounce?
Wall Street gurus have plenty of explanations for market moves--after the fact. Herewith, seven pillars of conventional wisdom about the comeback. We stock owners had a lot to be thankful for on Thanksgiving. In October Wall Street was Gloom City....
Xmas.com: Forget about the Traffic, the Crowds, the Ugly Battles for Sold-Out Toys. This Season Millions Are Giddily Cybershopping Their Way through the Holidays
Last christmas season, mi- chelle Speetzen's life was like yours: Mall Hell. Enduring hourlong gridlock on the road from suburban Spring, Texas, to Houston's Willowbrook Mall, the 36-year-old working mom would whiff on her wish list and get back in...