Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 11, September 13

A Guarded Star: Long after He Left the Basketball Court, the Legend of 'Dollar Bill' Endures. He Always Hit the Open Man-But Kept Himself Closed Off
Even now, wherever Bill Bradley goes, people are carrying basketballs. White middle-aged fathers push their young sons ahead of them, clutching a Magic Marker and a ball taken from the garage, or a copy of Bradley's coffee-table book, "Values of the...
A Handful of Tangos in Paris: A Graphic French Film Pushes the Envelope on Sex
Outside of porn movies, no film has ever explored sex more explicitly than Catherine Breillat's "Romance." This alone will make it a subject of controversy--one erect penis on a U.S. screen is more incendiary than a thousand guns, and "Romance" has...
A Long Season of Wall Street Weirdness: Confused by Greenspan's Speeches and the NYSE's Plan to Go Public? You're Not Alone
If you're feeling grumpy these days, don't feel guilty about it. After all, this is a grumpy time of year, what with Labor Day marking the unofficial end of summer. Bye-bye, vacation. Hello, work or school. Yechh! And if you've tried to make sense...
Bradley's Shot: It's Official This Week. Bill Bradley Is Offering Democrats a Chance to Cleanse Themselves of Clinton
It was barely more than a broom closet--a tiny, windowless room in the basement of a Capitol annex--but it had what Bill Bradley wanted: a few lockers, a shower stall, space for an exercise bike. He'd steered clear of the plush little gyms on the Hill...
Fashion's Frat Boy: Michael Jeffries's Sexy Take on Student Life Has Turned Abercrombie and Fitch into a Top National Retailer
Michael Jeffries, CEO of Abercrombie & Fitch, shows up for an interview dressed to chill: shorts, turtleneck, sandals. If you're heading up one of the nation's trendiest clothing chains, you'd better look the part. And Jeffries is poster-boy cool,...
Frankenstein Foods? That's What Europeans Are Calling Genetically Modified Crops That Abound in America. Exporters Have Been Forced to Listen
Don't look for the southern French town of Montredon on your globe. It isn't even on local road maps, perhaps because it has only 20 inhabitants. But one of them, a Parisian intellectual turned activist-farmer named Jose Bove, may change that. He's...
Furor over Firearms, the Great Gun Debate, Faring Well on Welfare?, They're Just Wild about Harry, the United Nations and Kosovo
In response to our Aug. 23 Special Report, "America Under the Gun: What Must Be Done," more than 900 readers wrote in, most of them vehemently opposed to any form of increased gun control. "I am tired of being demonized because I stand up for my Second...
Glamour in the 'Hood: In a South-Central Gang, Kody Scott Finally Felt Useful as a Man. but the Biggest Part of the 'Work' Was Promoting the Gangster Image
"My father's generation was the last responsible generation," said Sanyika Shakur (now Kody Scott's legally adopted name) as he welcomed me in August 1997 to his girlfriend's two-bedroom house in California's San Fernando Valley. Four years had passed...
Help! What Am I Doing? the Next Growth Industry Will Be Financial Planning, as Boomers Inherit or Retire
On the surface, it looks like the golden age of do-it-yourself personal finance. We're trading stocks without brokers, buying insurance on the Web and choosing among asset allocations for our company 401(k)s. We stormed the Kingdom of Money like revolutionaries...
Learning the Killing Game: Kosovo's Children Are Its Hope for the Future. but What Does a 9-Year-Old Kosovar Albanian Child Want to Do When He Grows Up? "Kill Serbs."
It was a feel-good scene in post-war Kosovo. British NATO troops hosted a barbecue to celebrate fixing up the Our Happiness Kindergarten in Pristina. Ethnic Albanian children aged 4 to 7 joined hands and sang, in English, "I'm a free, free child in...
Life and Death at Princeton: Prof. Peter Singer Is Pro-Choice and He Is the Abortion-Rights Movement's Worst Nightmare
Princeton, N.J.--The university's motto, "Dei Sub Numine Viget," does not say, as some Princetonians insist, "God went to Princeton." It says, "Under God's Power She Flourishes." As the academic year commences, Peter Singer comes to campus to teach...
Necessary Shots? Childhood Vaccinations Have Saved Countless Lives. but Some Parents Worry about Adverse Effects. What You Should Know
Since the birth of her twin daughters last May, Theresa Sakamoto of Santa Monica, Calif., hasn't been getting much sleep. It's not just the babies who are keeping her up--it's Sakamoto's own internal debate over whether to vaccinate them. "If I knew...
Now You Can Phone Home and Chat All Night: As Long-Distance Rates Fall, Will Free Calls Be Next?
Rudi Pittman, a 29-year-old computer programmer, is a grizzled veteran of one of the decade's great marketing sagas: the long-distance wars. Seven years ago Pittman was blithely paying 25 cents a minute for long-distance calls and running up huge phone...
People Smugglers Inc. 'Coyotes' Are Making Fortunes off Illegal Immigrants
"Humans," says Roger Barnett. "That's the greatest prey there is on earth." He pulls his pickup off the highway near his 22,000-acre ranch outside Douglas, Ariz. He thinks illegal immigrants who've just crossed the border from Mexico might be hiding...
Putting Down Some Roots: A Fund-Raising Pal Helps the Clintons Go Suburban
It's the sort of house that everyone wants and only investment bankers can afford. But with the help of a rich friend, Bill and Hillary Clinton, who are saddled with hefty legal bills, last week bought a house that is comfy and airy, stately but not...
She's Got a Mouth on Her: The Exuberant Talk-Show Host Ruby Wax Hits the States
Ruby Wax is outrageous. On her hit BBC television series "Wax Meets," she once accepted an invitation to Sarah Ferguson's home, only to rummage through the duchess's fridge and bedroom drawers. She climbed on top of Pamela Anderson Lee in the back...
Spicy Literature, from 'Sixth Sense' to Sixth Grade, Unsupported Evidence, Ungentle Ben
We'll tell you what we really, really don't want: both Geri Halliwell and the remaining Spice Girls are set to rehash her salty break with the group in print by releasing feuding autobiographies. Gore Vidal vs. Norman Mailer it's not. But last week,...
Sun Country Shines: A Feisty Little Airline Uses Low Fares and Wicked Ads to Battle Northwest, the Midwest's Dominant Carrier
Romance is taking flight in the Midwest, thanks to Sun Country Airlines. Sweethearts Kevin Boulier and Jodi Wran, living in different states, used to say it was too expensive to see each other more than once a month. Fares on Northwest Airlines, the...
The Broken Promise: In the New Economy, Work Moved from Vital Production and Job Security to Paper Pushing and Massive Layoffs
On the surface, said Richard Foster, who came to McDonnell Douglas in the late '60s to work in the NASA space lab, life as an aerospace man seemed to offer the ultimate in masculine freedom. "It was idyllic," he told me. "All these little green lawns...
The Dogs of War: Michael Bernhardt Went to Vietnam to Honor His Sense of Justice. but the War Destroyed His Idea of Manhood
As far back as Michael Bernhardt could remember watching World War II movies, he could remember wanting to serve. The summers of his boyhood in the backyards of Long Island were one long idyll of war play on an imagined European front. "We had leaders,"...
The Importance of Ernestine: A German Immigrant, She's a Scholar, a Cancer Survivor and Now a Campaigner
It was love at first sight. Almost. Ernestine Schlant, a professor on hiatus from teaching, was working as an assistant producer for a film company in New York. The studio was shooting a series of famous people interviewing other famous people. Schlant's...
The Internet Is Everywhere, Even on TV, Easy E-Mail, the Net Can Help When It's Time to Tie the Knot
Ever since Discover Brokerage's tow truck used your TV to sell wealth for all through its URL a year ago, e-businesses have flocked to the powerful offline medium to lure you online. Subtle they aren't. Clever? You bet. Here, a few of our faves: ...
The Silent Anguish of the Healers: Patients Suffer When Physicians Fall Prey to Stress
I recently received a letter about the retirement of a senior partner in a group medical practice: "Fortunately," it said, "he is able to retire from medicine with his health and his sanity intact." At about the same time, I had lunch with a newly...
This Time, a Backlash' for Guys: What's a Nice Feminist like Susan Faludi Doing Writing a Book about Men? and What's with the Suggestive Title? the Author Talks about Men, Mail and Pornography
A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Susan Faludi emerged as a cultural troublemaker in 1991 with "Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women," which set off a political firestorm by documenting what she called men's subtle and not-so-subtle...
Throwing Heat: It's Great to See Costner Back in the Ballpark. the Actor Opens Up about Women and Movies-And Talks Bluntly about the Struggle over 'For Love of the Game.'
In Sam Raimi's "For Love of the Game," Kevin Costner plays Billy Chapel, a legendary Detroit Tiger about to go on the mound for the last game of the season--and possibly the last game of his career. Chapel has just learned he's going to be traded after...
Turning Up the Heat on Waco, Trouble Ahead?, Bush Gets a Reading Lesson, No More Beanies? Say It Ain't So!, the Fine Art of Sports Heckling, the Tooth of the Matter, Oh, Lord, What Have I Done?, I'm OK, You're Mononoke: Anime Arrives, Capital Mother, You Go, Girl, Get Your Goat
So far, the FBI has taken the brunt of embarrassing revelations that flammable tear-gas canisters were used at the 1993 Branch Davidian compound in Waco. But as Congress gears up to investigate who withheld the information, it seems there's plenty...
Warning: Never Mess with a Mama Bear! When I Saw an Older Boy Hurt My Son, I Ignored the Experts and Got Angry. Wow, Did It Feel Good
One of the many important--but difficult--tasks of parenting is knowing when to step into a situation and take action and when to hold back and allow the child to confront--and hopefully resolve--the situation for himself or herself. This is precisely...
What's the Key to Keyshawn? Johnson's Brash Confidence Has Ruffled Feathers and Alienated Teammates, but It's Taken Him a Long Way
Keyshawn Johnson is out of uniform and decidedly out of character. Dressed in muted grays that match the subdued decor in his new Beverly Hills restaurant, Reign, Johnson is leaning on the bar nervously watching women in too-tight dresses parade upstairs...
Who's Keeping Score: As Old Measures of Masculinity Faded, the Swaggering Boys of the Spur Posse Made a Game of Sexual Conquest
The Spur Posse burst out of the orderly suburb of Lakewood, Calif., as America's dreaded nightmare--teenage boys run amok, a microcosm of a misogynistic and violent male culture. In March 1993 police arrested nine Spurs, ages 15 to 19, on suspicion...