Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 16, October 18

A Fistful of Darkness: David Fincher's Bleak and Angry 'Fight Club' Wants to Disturb You-But It May Be Trying a Little Too Hard
Jack (Edward Norton), the narrator of David Fincher's seriously wacked-out "Fight Club," is an insomniac wage slave so alienated from his life he takes to frequenting support groups. He starts with Men's Testicular Cancer. Sobbing in the arms of men...
Being Spike Jonze: From Music-Video Wizard to Movie Director, and the Quirky Trip There
Spike Jonze doesn't want you to know what it's like being Spike Jonze. His mind wears a little sign on it: KEEP OUT. Jonze, 29, sits on a Soho stoop in the early fall sunshine, looking unabashedly youthful in a slouchy skateboard T shirt and khaki...
Doo-Wop Hits the Opera: Arthur Miller's 'View from the Bridge' in Full Voice
By late last week, William Bolcom had finished his last-minute busywork. His much-anticipated opera "A View from the Bridge," based on Arthur Miller's play about Verdi-esque intrigue in 1950s Brooklyn, would have its world premiere Saturday night at...
Facing More Fire at the FBI: Louis Freeh Has Tried to Draw a 'Bright Line' against Ethical Lapses-But the Director Has Yet to Tame the Bureau's Instinct for Protecting Its Own at All Costs
FBI director Louis Freeh is about to be embarrassed again by his own troops. On Capitol Hill, the FBI is already under fire for mishandling the investigation of Chinese espionage at the nuclear lab at Los Alamos, N.M. For years, the FBI's spycatchers...
Finding the 'X-Files' Exit, Going to the Chapel, Mr. and Mrs. Jacko Throw in the Glove, She's Got Canvas Genes
Mulder and Scully may have only one more season to uncover the truth. Gillian Anderson says she's tired of all the paranormal hours and wants out of "The X-Files." "Physically, psychologically, I don't think I could do another season," she says. "I'm...
Funding Clinton's Legacy: The Quiet Effort to Raise Millions for a Presidential Library
On the president's official schedule, the meetings are cryptically listed as "private events." In restaurants and hotel suites, surrounded by his most faithful and wealthiest supporters, Bill Clinton is quietly raising money for the project most important...
Gun Valley's First Victim?, Winter's End, A New Threat in South Asia, It's Time at Last: Show Me the Candy!, No-Jean Scene, Laugh and Dry, Not Such a Small World after All, Taking Sprawl Lying Down
Not a single lawsuit filed by a city against the gun industry has made it to trial, but the storm of litigation is already taking its toll on gunmakers. The biggest victim so far is Colt, the inventor of the revolver and a stalwart of New England's...
Heavy Meddling: The Diet-Pill Phenom Metabolife Strikes Back in a PR Battle against '20/20'
If you were worried about the safety of Metabolife 356, perhaps you'd do what Flora Hickman did: you'd call the authoritative-looking 800 number printed on the bottom of each bottle. Hickman, 38, of Los Angeles, started taking the herbal supplement...
Hola, Oprah. It's Padre Alberto. A Talk-Show Host with Spirit
Television producer Nely Galan was having a spiritual crisis. Burned out from work, the 36-year-old president of Entertainment for the Spanish-language station Telemundo went to Oaxaca, Mexico, on a retreat. She knew she needed someone to talk to,...
How Parents Can Help: It's a Difficult Time for the Whole Family, but There Are Ways to Make These Years Easier. Your Kids Still Need You
One day they're crawling around in the sandbox; the next day they're prowling the Internet. Tweens like to think of themselves as all grown up--but they still need plenty of support and guidance from parents. Some tips: BODY CHANGES. Girls may begin...
Is No Place Sacred?, the Cradle of Health, Slaughter in Ft. Worth, the Wrong Nightie, Governor Schwarzenegger?
"A Sanctuary Shooting" in our Sept. 27 issue, about the murder of seven people in a Ft. Worth, Texas, church, drew a passionate response. A number of letter writers called the incident an example of the growing persecution of Christians, and chided...
It Could Be Apocalypse Again: Russia's Beleaguered Military Lashes out in Deep Frustration
Two Russian fighter-bombers, flying low and tight over high mountain ridges, dropped eight cluster bombs on the village of Elistanzhi. One bomb hit the local school, killing at least nine students, and others demolished eight houses. Most of those...
Playing Politics with the Bomb: Rejecting the Test-Ban Treaty Would Be a Green Light for Ambitious Regimes Everywhere
Treaty, schmeaty. What could be more deadly than a bunch of blowhard senators discussing "verification" and "stockpile stewardship"? Americans are focused on important matters, like Amazon.com's latest share price and why Donald Trump thinks it's yucky...
Riding the Wave with the Donald: Presidential Politics Can Be 'Amazing,' Trump Discovers, and Even Profitable
So this is what it's like to be Donald Trump. As soon as the master builder and would-be president bolts from his limo into Manhattan's theater district, necks are craning, voices are calling, flashbulbs are flaring. "Hey, Mr. Trump, enjoyed seeing...
Setting off on Her Own: Hillary Clinton Decides She Must Think More like a Senate Candidate-And Less like the President's Wife
The Democratic donors packed Victor and Sarah Kovner's Manhattan living room, spilling into the apartment next door. For up to $1,000 apiece, they got wine, snacks and a chance to sing "If I Had a Hammer" with Peter Yarrow (of Peter, Paul and Mary)....
Sex, Bets and Bikers: Vancouver's Starnet Communications Was a High-Flier, until a Police Raid Spooked Investors
The raid was swift, and thorough. As dawn broke over one of Vancouver's seedier business districts last Aug. 20, a heavily armed team of law-enforcement agents smashed into the offices of Starnet Communications International, a four-year-old company...
Sound and Fury, Signifying Zip: The Uproar at the Brooklyn Museum Generates Heat, but No Light. So What Else Is New?
The Brooklyn Museum is closed on Tuesdays. So said the guard at the door. No wonder there were no lines, no protesters, no one handing out airsickness bags and copies of the Hail Mary. Some rather conventional cannas in the forecourt waved in a faint...
Taking Stock of Martha: A Warm Reception Is Expected for Stewart's Offering
Like a great dinner party, an initial public offering of stock should provide something for everyone. The invited guests get a lovely meal or a chance to invest in a promising company, and the hostess gets the thrill of orchestrating the perfect gathering...
The Gift of a Great Teacher: I Learned That Truth Was No Less Important Just Because It Was Unpopular or Unfashionable
If you are lucky in life, you will have at least one great teacher. More than three decades ago, I had Ed Banfield, a political scientist who taught mainly at the University of Chicago and Harvard University. Ed's recent death at 83 saddened me (which...
The Missing Men of Djakovica: More Than 1,100 Ethnic Albanians Disappeared from a Single Small Town during the War. Almost Certainly, Most Are Dead. When Will the Rest Come Home?
The red arrows and white circles taped on the walls of Lulieta Sharani's compound tell a story that still has no ending. At 9 o'clock in the morning of May 10, after days of furious street fighting between Kosovo Liberation Army guerrillas and Serb...
The Next Big Thing: Were You Too Late for the Internet Craze? Don't Worry: Demography Is Destiny, and Population Trends Will Create New Opportunities
Every decade has its dazzlers. In the grim, gas-line '70s, energy companies ruled, racking up sixfold gains in an otherwise stagnant era. The sybaritic '80s saw tobacco, alcohol, entertainment and soft drinks dominate Wall Street, not just after hours...
The Truth about Tweens: They Are a Generation Stuck on Fast Forward, in a Fearsome Hurry to Grow Up. Richer Than Ever, They're Also a Retailer's Dream, with a Seemingly Insatiable Desire for the Latest in Everything
Last year, Maja Kahn's look was hip-hop. This year, she's gone glam. Typical outfit: a tight blue tank top, dark blue flare-legged pants, black plat-forms with silver buckles and nine necklaces of brown or silver beads to match the hoops in her ears....
Weighing the Health Risks, in Your Body: Do Diet Pills like Metabolife Work? and Are They Safe?
In this overweight nation, there's a feeding frenzy for weight-loss pills. Metabolife International says it expects to sell $900 million worth of supplements this year. At its peak, Fen-Phen was taken by millions of Americans eager for a quick way...
We're Happily Married and Living Apart: I Had a Job Offer in Another State. My Wife Wasn't Ready to Leave. We're Still Not Sure How This Will End
I stood in line for 25 minutes before the single clerk at Air Cheap told me the $189 flight was canceled. Cold fear shot through me at the prospect of missing the last plane. I ran to the airline next door and paid $800 for a one-way ticket on a flight...