Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 25

A Ford Behind the Wheel: The Chairman Steps Up His Defense of the Family Firm
The man whose name is on all those Ford Explorers with the defective Firestone tires is finally coming out to defend his embattled company. Ford chairman William Clay Ford Jr. formally emerged last week, promising the public that his board of directors...
An Ailing Profession: Under the Knife: How a Family with Two Generations of Doctors Is Learning to Live in a Health-Care System Ruled by the Pressure to Cut Costs
Anesthesiologist Julius Migliori remembers the 1960s fondly. His patients would enter the hospital as much as three days before surgery for elaborate pre-op work, then stick around afterward for a week or so of recovery. And when it came time to pay...
And They're off! Diving in» an Australian Swimming Phenom, American Gold Medals and a Spectacular Ring of Fire Mark the First Days of the Olympic Games
Somewhere amid the endless opening procession of fruit-colored blazers, beaming under their hats, were the faces we will get to know so well over the coming days and weeks: the hard-bodied sprinter squeezing out the last few hundredths of a second...
At MIT, the Party's Over: A Tragic Alcohol Case Concludes with a Costly Apology
The high jinks began on "Animal House" Night: 12 new Phi Gamma Delta pledges at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology were ordered to watch the iconic Belushi flick while downing beer and Jack Daniel's. Around 11 p.m., they lined up to meet their...
A Twisted Pair: With Trustbusters Poised to Rule on the AOL Time Warner Merger, the Behemoth Is under Pressure to Untangle Its Complex Relationship with AT&T
They're supposed to be cutthroat competitors. But over the past year AT&T and AOL Time Warner, the two hulks of the Internet age, have seemed downright cozy. In July AOL and AT&T agreed to jointly pitch consumers on the wonders of the wireless...
Bonjour. Parlez-Vous DJ? Madonna Is on a Trip into French Electronica
Hey Mr. DJ, put a record on, I wanna dance with my baby," demands Madonna on the title track of her newest album, "Music." Her call to the guy behind the decks drives the bouncy, addictive single, just as it has driven her career of late. Pairing up...
Business Plan in a Can: Write Your Own Seamless, Integrated B2B Solution!
Moving out to Silicon Valley without a business plan is like going to the beach without a swimsuit. While all your friends are whooping it up in the surging tides of the New Economy, you're stuck on dry land with nothing to talk about over the wine...
Cyberscope: This Week: The Red Armies of the Night, Four Minutes of Free Fun, Patchy Protection, Oh, What a Tangled Web
HOT PROPERTY The Red Armies of the Night Who says there's no peace dividend? An American-Russian partnership called Night Owl Optics (nightowloptics.com) is manufacturing night-vision goggles, binoculars and monoculars in former Soviet military factories...
Diving In: An Australian Swimming Phenom, American Gold Medals and a Spectacular Ring of Fire Mark the First Days of the Olympic Games
48 Years Round The Track In 1952 John Lucas failed to qualify for the U.S. team in the 10,000-meter run. But that hasn't stopped him from running at every Olympics (except Moscow) since then. He arrives a day or two before the Games begin, sneaks into...
Failing Grades: A Small College Hits the Skids: No Pool and a Tiny Endowment Added to Trinity's Woes
Mattie Pontecorvo should be a walking advertisement for Trinity College of Vermont. For the last two years she's thrived at the tiny women's Roman Catholic college: class president, resident adviser, campus tour guide and all-round Trinity booster....
Flo's Big-Dollar Backers: Bottom Line: The Cash Behind a Grass-Roots Campaign
Emotional and to the point, the ads are playing on televisions in key election states like Michigan and Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Missouri. In the spots, Ardell DeCarlo, a cancer survivor, praises the medicine that saved her life--and warns that...
Give Seniors the Power to Choose: Go Private: Cover Drugs without Breaking the Bank
Medicine is far different today than it was when Medicare was created in 1965. Today, prescription drugs are often the first treatment option because they have fewer risks and better results than surgery or hospitalization. Drugs now allow many people...
Hollywood Lands in the Hot Seat: D.C. Cries Foul on Violence
Hollywood rarely turns down a Washington invite, from a chance to bunk in the Lincoln Bedroom to an opportunity to kick in thousands at a Clinton-Gore fund-raiser. So why did eight leading entertainment-industry leaders pull a Capitol no-show last...
How Bush Can Find His Voice: Whether or Not He Bounces Back, He Can Still Help Give Voters the Campaign They Deserve
George W. Bush made two good decisions last week. He finally agreed on all three officially scheduled October debates, and his aides let it be known that he will now shift away from character attacks against Al Gore in favor of more focus on issues....
In Defense of *$##@$%#: So We've Taken the X out of Expletive. Is That a Cheapening of Standards, or Is It Mad Cool?
As the train hurtles through the dark of the subway tunnels, three teenagers consider aloud the events of their school day. In the fashion of adolescent boys, they seem to occupy more space than the simple size of their bodies would suggest. They stand...
Into the Sunshine: Wen Ho Lee Walks Free with a Judge's Apology, but Prosecutors Insist Their Case Is Not Closed. the Next Chapter
Every Saturday morning Sylvia Lee and her children would pass through the metal detector and take their seats by the glass partition in the bleak room where maximum-security prisoners meet visitors. A door would open and Wen Ho Lee, diminutive and...
Investment of Champions: Hall of Fame QB Joe Montana Joins Two Former Teammates in the Ultimate Venture-Capital Fund
To find Silicon Valley's newest investment guru, you need to travel 90 minutes north of San Francisco, to the rolling hills of Napa Valley. There, amid the country roads and verdant wineries, you'll find a secluded ranch with 30 horses, 50 head of...
It's More Than A Drug Problem: Expanding Medicare Would Force Tomorrow's Workers to Subsidize Baby Boomers' Retirement
The best argument for a medicare prescription-drug benefit is disarmingly simple: no one designing Medicare today would exclude drug coverage. It makes just as much sense to pay for drugs as it does for doctors and hospitals. The fact that Medicare...
Light & 'Dark': Bjork's Acting Debut Is in One of the Fall's Most Controversial Movies
In Lars von Trier's "Dancer in the Dark," the Icelandic singer and composer Bjork gives what may be the most wrenching performance ever given by someone who has no interest in being an actor. It is fitting that when we first glimpse her character,...
MAIL CALL: Many Readers Applauded Our Sept. 4 Cover Story on Diabetes
An American Epidemic Many readers applauded our Sept. 4 cover story on diabetes. "You've done it again! Kudos to NEWSWEEK for taking yet another complex and difficult health issue and presenting it in a simple and understandable fashion," wrote one....
Making Coverage Affordable for All: Better Medicare: Use Our Prosperity to Help Our Seniors
Today more than 60 percent of Americans on Medicare have inadequate prescription-drug coverage. Some get prescription drugs from HMOs that are increasing premiums, lowering benefits and often abandoning Medicare altogether. Some have private insurance...
Manolo's Big Moment: Impractical. Expensive. Everyone Wants a Pair
You wouldn't pick Manolo Blahnik out of a crowd as the fifth star of HBO's "Sex and the City." But that's just how Sarah Jessica Parker describes the shoe designer."We shot a scene this morning where Carrie is mugged. She begs [the thief], 'You can...
Mind Games: Psyched » among Top Athletes, the Winning Edge Often Comes as Much from the Brain as the Body. Scientists Are Figuring out Why
You don't have to convince Steve Backley of the power of the mind over the body. When the British javelin thrower, who won bronze in Barcelona in 1992 and silver in Atlanta in 1996, was unable to walk (let alone train) after spraining his ankle a few...
Newsmakers: This Week: 'Destination Mir' / the Royals / Tennis / Christina Aguilera
Survivor in Orbit Maybe "Survivor" producer Mark Burnett is as sick of Richard Hatch as the rest of us. For his new reality show, he's teaming up with NBC to launch the contest winner into outer space. After missing out on the reality genre and paying...
Periscope
CAMPAIGN 2000 LAZIO COMES ON STRONG. MAYBE TOO STRONG. After their first face-off in the New York Senate race last week, Hillary Clinton and Rick Lazio left the stage without shaking hands. Lazio hugged his wife, then dashed to the press room to...
Perspectives
"The next few days, I'm going fishing." Nuclear scientist Wen Ho Lee, after being held in prison without bail for nine months "[The government] did not embarrass me alone, but they embarrassed this entire nation and everyone who is a citizen...
Rescuing Big Brother: The Sunshine State Once Shone on the Bushes, but Now Jeb Has to Scramble to Deliver It to W
Even at 4:30 in the morning, Florida was all sunshine for Al Gore. On Labor Day he and Joe Lieberman showed up for a predawn rally in Tampa to find 1,000 admirers gathered outside a firehouse. Then last week George W. Bush swept into Florida to discuss...
Tech Notes: This Week: Sega Goes for the Net, One Step Forward., X Marks the Spot
TECH NOTES CONSOLES Sega Goes for the Net You can sack a stranger on sega.net's NFL 2K1, the first multiplayer, online game available to both PC and Dreamcast owners, who can now play each other on the Web. Players dial in using the console's 56K modem...
Theater: A Titan Takes the Stage: Gore Vidal Wraps Up His Fictional History of America, While His 'Best Man' Goes Back to Broadway
A MONOLOGUE, WITH INTERRUPTIONS, IN ONE ACT The scene: a suite in the Plaza Hotel in Manhattan. Only the living room is visible. On the back wall, pale light filters through double windows with shades drawn. In front of the window is a table with a...
The First Debate over Presidential Debates: The History-Making Kennedy-Nixon Debates in 1960 Were Eight Years in the Making. I Know; I Was There
If this year's debate over presidential debates seems rough, try arranging the first televised presidential debates in American history. It took eight years! In the early 1950s, as president of CBS, I suggested to my colleagues at the network that...
The Heat from Gore's Kitchen: His Forces Are Outmaneuvering the Bush Team in Early Skirmishes of the Spin War
As Al Gore's spin doctor in chief, Mark Fabiani is paid to prevent train wrecks. The other week he saw disaster looming down the tracks. The issue: Hollywood and violence. He knew the Federal Trade Commission was about to release a report on the marketing...
The Lost Peace Plan: The 1995 Document That Paved the Way to Camp David, and Perhaps beyond. A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
It may be hard to imagine now, with the Mideast peace process faltering badly. But consider, if you will, the following scenario. Top Israeli and Palestinian negotiators shake hands and agree to recognize each other's nation in perpetuity. They accept...
The Man Who Isn't Slobo: A Foe Who Can Win-If Milosevic Allows a Fair Vote
People who know him well say Vojislav Kostunica is shy and lazy, with little charisma and few communication skills. He is a political loner; critics used to call his organization a "van party," claiming that all of its members could fit into a single...
What Medicare Really Needs: A Touch of Gore and a Touch of Bush Would Go a Long Way toward Stabilizing the Program
Don't sweat the small stuff. The dueling Bush and Gore plans, which add a new drug benefit for seniors, are sprinkled with vote-catching details. But either plan would change before being presented to Congress, and change again, after being spun through...
Why Drugs Cost So Much: High Stakes: We Spend $125 Billion a Year on Drugs, and Prescription Costs Are a Hot Political Button. Staying Healthy, However, Isn't Cheap. the Real Story Behind the Sticker Shock
For years, Robert and Sarah Bergeon have quietly struggled to pay for the medicines they need. The South Milwaukee, Wis., couple spend about $6,500 annually, nearly a third of their $21,000 income, on the seven different drugs 71-year-old Sarah takes...