Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 16

All That Glitters.China's PR Blitz May Win It in the 2008 Games, but Even the Sunniest Face Can't Entirely Obscure a Darker Reality
China has learned its lesson well. Eight years ago, the last time it tried to host the Olympic Games, officials got all huffy when they were asked about their country's blighted human-rights record. To no one's great surprise, Beijing lost the 2000...
America Doesn't Need Crusades: What I Celebrate Most as a New Citizen Is That Our Politics Have Become Beautifully Banal
Last week I celebrated my first Fourth of July as an American. I was sworn in a few weeks earlier at a ceremony that would have sent chills down Pat Buchanan's spine. Seated in a noisy Brooklyn auditorium, more than 2,000 new citizens--almost all black...
A Million Amazing Beats: An Experimental Bionic Heart Saves a Life-For Now
The patient, a man in his mid- to late 50s, was about as sick as it's possible to be--and that just may have saved his life. He was in end-stage heart failure, his lungs filling with fluid, barely able to eat or walk a few steps. Chronic kidney failure...
An Affair to Remember: The Cops Finally Got Rep. Gary Condit to Acknowledge an Intimate Relationship with Intern Chandra Levy. but That Didn't Bring Them Closer to Solving the Mystery of What Happened to Her. the Road to Condit's Admission
Gary Condit was, at last, in the mood to talk. Sitting calmly with police investigators in the Washington offices of his lawyer late Friday night, the California congressman spoke the words the police, and the rest of the country, had been waiting...
A Prosecutor's Hardest Case: The New FBI Chief Takes on a 'Culture of Arrogance'
As a preppie, a princetonian and a University of Virginia law graduate, Robert Swan Mueller III would have been perfectly at ease in the clubby world of corporate law. But Mueller, who last week became George W. Bush's nominee to succeed Louis Freeh...
Beijing's Risky Game: China Has No Idea What It's Bargaining for. If It Gets the Games, the Regime Will Be Forced to Behave
The argument is constantly made that Beijing should be denied the 2008 Olympics because it suppresses its own people, is stirring up unhealthy and belligerent nationalist fervor and wants to become a monster power that will devour its neighbors. The...
'Big Dude' Gets Profiled: Team Bush Gaffe Tests Ties with U.S. Arabs and Muslims
It was one of the coolest moments of his life. Abdullah Al-Arian was finally old enough to vote for president, and George W. Bush, on a campaign hop through Tampa, Fla., had singled him out in the crowd. Bush called the college student "Big Dude" and...
Busting the Web Bandits: Online Fraud Was Threatening to Drive an Internet Start-Up out of Business. Then PayPal Decided to Stay and Fight Back
According to an indictment handed down last month by a federal grand jury, Alexey Ivanov, 20, and Vassili Gorchkov, 25, are two extremely audacious hackers. Operating out of Chelyabinski, Russia, the pair allegedly broke into the computer systems of...
Cyberscope: This Week: Sony's Robotic Dog, Online Space Shop, and PlayStation 2
HOT PROPERTY: TOYS A Really Hot Dog When Sony introduced its AIBO robotic dog two years ago, people scratched their heads--and bought it anyway, for a whopping $2,500. Tiger Electronics, the toymaker responsible for Furby, has created a cheaper...
God, Mammon, and 'Bibleman': Christian Entertainment Is Adding Up to Temporal Riches. Can a Movement Become a Mass Market without Selling Its Soul?
Some directors say a little prayer before they launch a new movie. Matthew Crouch isn't taking any chances. He plans to visit 1,900 preachers before his $20 million film, "Megiddo: Omega Code 2," hits theaters in September. That may seem like overkill--or...
Honey, I Shrunk the Rappers: Kid Emcees Lil' Bow Wow and Lil' Romeo Make It Big
Ten-year-old Lashawn Bailey is screaming so loud that tears are streaming down her caramel-colored face. On this Saturday night, she and about 1,000 other little brown girls have packed into the Wiltern Theatre, in Los Angeles, dressed in their flyest...
In the Name of the Father: The Myth of the Catholic Vote, or How to Turn Plain Political Positions into Something Sacred
I grew up in a suburb in which neighborhood was defined by parish, in which the smell of fish sticks filled the air on Friday nights and there were more copies of the Baltimore Catechism than of Webster's dictionary. It was not until I was 8 years...
Mail Call: Readers Respond to Our June 25 Issue
Technology vs. Touching Many readers were fascinated by our June 25 cover story. "Your feature on the health and technology innovations of the future was truly amazing," said one. "Just to think about them is testament to our many brilliant scientists."...
Memory's Mind Games: Absent-Mindedness Is Just the Start of Memory Problems. When the Brain Distorts the Past, Our View of Who We Are Suffers
As slide shows go, it wasn't even in the same league as your aunt's vacation snapshots, but the audience was paying close attention: there was going to be a quiz. In one sequence a student sitting in a packed lecture hall topples onto the floor. In...
Newsmakers: This Week: Carson Daly and Tara Reid, Abercrombie and Fitch, Sopranos, and Jim Morrison
American 'Bye' Carson Daly's pussycat ran away, and he doesn't even care. Some clarification: Tara Reid, the raccoon-eyed "Josie and the Pussycats" star, told New York's Daily News that she and the MTV pretty boy have called off their already postponed...
Periscope
POLITICS Bush, DeLay and the 'Dynamite Factory' One administration official likened the GOP declaration to a "hand grenade tossed into a dynamite factory." White House officials were furious last week after House GOP leaders issued a statement...
Perspectives
"I dedicate this win to him. There ain't nobody else." Dale Earnhardt Jr., after winning a race at the Daytona track where his father, racing legend Dale Earnhardt, was killed in February "You cannot spin this report to make it sound positive;...
Playboy Goes XXX: Lusting for Profits, the Bunny Hops into Hard Core
Two days after playboy Enterprises announced it was buying three X-rated cable movie channels--a dramatic departure from the company's soft-core image--Hugh Hefner hosted an Independence Day gathering at his mansion in Los Angeles. Fireworks burst...
Please Ask Me Who, Not 'What,' I Am: My Ethnicity Isn't Obvious on First Glance. but Why Should It Matter to People I've Just Met?
I've been thinking a lot about that "Seinfeld" episode where Elaine is dating this guy and it's driving her nuts because she doesn't know "what" he is. They ultimately discover that neither is exotic enough for the other and they're so disappointed...
Saving Summer: Bad Studio Movies Are Raining like 'Cats & Dogs.' Now It's Little Movies to the Rescue
There's a real disadvantage in not being a teenager in the summertime. If you don't happen to be preoccupied with tomb raiding, street racing, mummification or talking animals, Hollywood doesn't want to know you. As far as it's concerned, you cease...
Shining a Light on Our 'Dark Corners': The U.N. World Conference on Race Is in Disarray. but Don't Count the Diplomats out Yet. the Goal Is Noble, and Their Leader's Will Is Strong
There is something of the apostle in Mary Robinson, the U.N. high commissioner for human rights. So when she talks of "difficulty on the road to Durban," it puts one in mind of a more famous road, the one taken by Saul on his way to Damascus, en route...
Straight Talk on the Surplus: The Slowdown Is Darkening the Once-Rosy Budget Picture, but Beware of Alarmist Rhetoric
In 1967 President Lyndon Johnson appointed a 16-member commission--including congressional leaders, the Treasury secretary, the head of Congress's General Accounting Office and top economists--to overhaul the presentation of the federal budget. The...
Tech Notes
CLONING Resurrecting Rover Ever since he and his wife adopted Lacey, Howard Cohen has believed that they had the perfect dog. So this spring he paid a company called PerPETuate about $750 to store some of Lacey's cells in liquid-nitrogen freezers....
The Bone Collectors: Last Spring the U.S. Military Lost Seven Men Hunting for the Remains of MIAs in Vietnam. but the Search Goes On
No one knew the dangers better than Lt. Col. Rennie Cory Jr. An imposing Fort Bragg battalion commander with a classic "high and tight" haircut, he headed one unit of the Joint Task Force/Full Accounting Team, the U.S. government's ongoing search mission...
The Glorious Rise of Christian Pop: With Big Best Sellers, New Movies and Religious Rock, the $3 Billion Christian Entertainment Industry Is Exploding. on Tour with Young Believers
Are you ready to rip the face off this place?" screams the lead singer of Pillar. A hyped-up crowd of teens--6,000 strong--goes nuts. The aggressive rap-rock band launches into a pummeling kickoff number, the surly singer pounding the stage with his...
The Silent Partner: Caddying Is about More Than Bags and Clubs. the Intimate - and Lucrative - Relationship between a Pro Golfer and His Caddie
After his win last week at the Canon Greater Hartford Open, his second victory of the year and the 19th of his career, Phil Mickelson, the No. 2 golfer in the world, told a national television audience what PGA Tour insiders have known for years--he's...
Tough Love, Teen Death: A Boot-Camp Tragedy Raises Troubling Questions
Melanie Hudson wanted to get her 14-year-old son Tony some help. At heart, she knew he was a good kid. He had an insatiable appetite for Harry Potter books, and dreamed of building a Lego robot that would do all of the housework for her. But Tony had...