Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 7, August 17

Amazon.com Spreads Its Wings on the Web
Amazon.com touts itself as "Earth's Biggest Bookstore." But its entrepreneurial founder Jeff Bezos harbors broader ambitions. "Jeff isn't about books. He's about buying and selling things," says friend and techno-guru Paul Saffo at the Institute for...
A Mysterious Baby Mix-Up
They were adorable little girls--and they were almost certainly switched at birth. Now one has lost her parents to tragedy. What will happen next? The contractions were coming fast. In the delivery room at the University of Virginia Medical Center in...
A Summons to Gratitude
In this summer of Clinton scandals, 'Saving Private Ryan' taps a yearning for honor Popular culture can be a political barometer, and there is a storm warning for President Clinton in the public's response to the movie "Saving Private Ryan." Viewers...
Avoiding Business as Usual: Too Many Cards? Now You Can Scan Them into Your Computer
Not long ago, you had two choices for your glut of business cards. You could staple them into your Rolodex one by one. Or you could stack them on your desk until you forgot why you had them. Computers and personal digital assistants have made accessing...
Battling Backlash
After years of remarkably fast progress, gays are facing a new set of barriers. Where are the lines of tolerance being drawn? The great pool debacle probably won't go down as a major gay-rights setback, but it's shown West Hartford, Conn., how homosexuality...
Can Gays 'Convert'?
A controversial series of ads claims that homosexuals aren't born that way, and can change. A look inside the 'ex-gay' movement, and the elusive science of sexual orientation. In a town house in northwest Washington, D.C., Anthony Falzarano calls for...
Death of the Innocents
Marie Noe's eight babies died strangely, apparent victims of SIDS. Now she faces murder charges. Baby richard lived exactly one month before death took him, in 1949, while he slept in his parents' bedroom in a modest rowhouse in a working-class neighborhood...
Defining the Presidency Down
Clinton longs to loom large. But his temperament and the peculiarities of the times are undercutting his bid for the history books. The president," wrote the political scientist Clinton Rossiter in 1956, in his influential study "The American Presidency,"...
Dysfunction Junction: Growing Up-And Out-In 'Slums of Beverly Hills'
When Tamara Jenkins cast Natasha Lyonne in The Slums of Beverly Hills, she knew she'd have to give the actress different breasts. Lyonne was to play a teen who watches in horror as her sexual development becomes a subject of family banter. So director...
Explaining America to Itself
When accepting the 1997 university of missouri Honor Medal for Distinguished Service in Journalism in the fall of last year, Newsweek Contributing Editor Ellis Cose summed up his lifetime of writing on relations between the races by saying that his job,...
Geraldo Pulls a Punch
The Mike Tyson of TV news may have met his Evander Holyfield. After biting the hand that just fed him a $36 million contract, Geraldo Rivera last week recanted impolitic remarks about NBC News and a certain powerful colleague. In a TV Guide interview,...
God on the 50-Yard Line: Two NFL Teams Worry about a Texas Ministry
The national football league has learned that when it comes to players' off-field activities, there is no such thing as good news. Like its pro brethren, the NFL has suffered through a spate of embarrassing incidents, including drug and alcohol abuse,...
Leaving the Gay Ghetto
I called for a new post-gay identity, defined by more than sexuality and more open to self-criticism. So I got criticized--a lot. Six months ago, a dream came true, and i moved from London to New York City to become editor in chief of OUT, the magazine...
Living with the Bugs
Those recent Internet security flaws aren't just a passing problem. They're the new reality. Here's the recipe for an Internet security story. Start with one or two obscure computer scientists--anything from security consultants to grungy grad students....
Monica on the Stand
As Lewinsky tells her story to the grand jury, the president's team ponders how to fight back--in part, perhaps, by attacking the former intern's credibility. How ugly could it get? David Kendall didn't waste time. When the news broke late last month...
More Woe from Asia
If Tokyo doesn't get things right, a new round of currency and stock collapses could be coming How long can this go on? How many times are U.S. investors going to get jolted out of their bliss every few months by fears that the "Asia crisis" is seriously...
'Ooh, This Is Nasty'
A longtime bull explains why he turned bearish Nobody can say exactly why the market moves, but ralph acampora is getting some of the blame for last week's plunge. On Monday, Prudential's longtime bull was still saying the market would hit 10,000 this...
Point, Click and Pay
Online banking hasn't caught on. But services are on the way that could change how you pay bills. Chris perkins, 34, has paid bills from his downtown office in San Francisco, his parents' house in Michigan and from a New York City hotel while on business....
Should You Be Worried?
The fairy-tale stock market increases may have ended. Now's the time for a reality check. Think of this year's markets as a practice run. Are you really in stocks for the long term, or did night sweats almost chase you out? You've heard ad nauseam that...
Terror Times Two
African carnage: A simultaneous attack on two U.S. embassies killed nearly a dozen Americans, more than 100 others, and wounded thousands. Who is responsible? And why? Bombs play havoc with the physical environment, twisting metal, throwing slabs of...
The Duke's Odyssey: Eight Months after He Fled Cuba, Thisnew Yankee Is Still Looking for Home
For a few moments last month, New York Yankees pitcher Orlando (Duke) Hernandez managed to stave off the whirlwind of distractions, temptations and anxieties that has followed him since he made his dramatic escape from Cuba last December. Holed up in...
The Price of Distraction
TERROR: The bombings are just one foreign-policy problem for Bill Clinton. There is, after all, still Saddam. Nobody does it better, of course. As mourner-in-chief, Bill Clinton has an uncanny ability to say the correct thing, to emote exquisitely....
The Scandal in Our Midst
The way we lawmakers raise campaign money is out of control. It's time to clean up the system. For several years, I have been working with colleagues both in the Senate and House of Representatives to push for campaign-finance reform. It hasn't been...
The World of Puff Daddy
From hip-hop impresario to global star, Sean Combs now works round the clock, expanding his pop-culture enterprises. The global stardom of Sean (Puffy) Combs, once merely a behind-the-scenes impresario of hip-hop, can be traced to a moment: the 1997...
Trouble in Paradise: A Hawaiian Novelist Sparks a P.C. Protest
Japanese-american writer loisAnn Yamanaka, 36, has won awards for her searing depictions of poverty, violence and racism in her native Hawaii. Now she's had one taken away. "Saturday Night in the Pahala Theatre," her book of poems, won the Pushcart Prize...
What Was He Thinking?: Another Boston Columnist Runs into Trouble
One of these days, in the "gotcha" era of Steven Brill, when journalistic transgressions are suddenly big news, the media watchdogs are going to go too far. Some much-beloved scribe is going to make an honest, trivial mistake and get crucified for it....
With Love and Squalor
J. D. Salinger's former lover, Joyce Maynard, raises high the roof on his notoriously private life You can sneer all you want at Joyce Maynard's journalism, chortle at her Web site and gag over her novels, but you've got to hand it to the girl: when...