Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 7, August 16

A Daughter in the Loop: Al Gore's Eldest Is Quietly Joining Her Dad's Inner Circle
Nearly nine months pregnant, Karenna Gore Schiff had no intention of taking the political stage last June. She had to get permission from her doctor just to fly to the kickoff of her father's presidential campaign. But when her mom, Tipper, woke up...
A Hex upon Hollywood: The 'Blair Witch Project' Brew of Net Buzz and Low-Budget Thrills Has Tinseltown Spooked
The only predictable thing about the movie business is that a couple of times every decade something utterly unpredictable will happen. Something that upsets everybody's notion of what people are supposed to want to see. This, naturally, makes an already...
A Lama to the Globe: The Dalai Lama Looks beyond Tibet, and Meditates on His Reincarnation as an Ambassador of Buddhism
In a small yellow temple off a rutted mountain road in northern India, a simple image of the Buddha gazes north, over the Himalayas, toward Tibet. It is dawn and across the courtyard of what was once a British colonial cantonment, the Dalai Lama is...
A Secret War on the Roof of the World: Spooks, Monks and the CIA's Covert Gamble in Tibet
In 1958, the Dalai Lama was a 23-year-old god-king on the verge of losing his realm. The Chinese communists were closing in, and Tibet's spiritual leader was desperate. That's when he first heard that the Central Intelligence Agency was stepping up...
A Star on the Run: Singer Gloria Trevi and Her Manager Are Sought in a Lurid Scandal
Not long ago, when Gloria Trevi was Mexico's biggest rock star, Karina Yapor Gomez was one of her millions of fans. Each time Trevi performed in their hometown of Chihuahua, Karina and her mother would visit the star's hotel, and often they got close...
A Whole New Game: From Body Checks to Writing Checks, Ex-Pros Try out for the Owners' Position
Pro athletes once had little power beyond the bulging muscles in their arms and legs. Not anymore. Hockey's Mario Lemieux and basketball's Isiah Thomas are both crossing over to the other side of sports' great and contentious divide between Athlete...
Coke and Mrs. Colonel: Amid a War on Drug Trafficking, an American Officer's Wife Is Accused of Smuggling Narcotics from Bogota
The U.S. Army insists Col. James Hiett had no idea he might have been sleeping with the enemy. Since last summer, Hiett had been in command of the 200 American military personnel waging a difficult campaign against drug trafficking in Colombia. But...
Doctors Go Dot.Com: Need to Consult with a Specialist? Want a Prescription Written Fast? New Web Sites Offer a Stunning Array of Medical Services Online. Here's What's out There and How to Use It Wisely
Dina Wildey of Owings Mills, Md., is one wired woman. She uses e-mail every day to keep in touch with family members, and she spends hours browsing the Web--especially the health sites. She's not just reading brochures. Wildey recently discovered that...
Gwyneth and the Bard, Nearly a Century Old and Still Going Strong, A Kennedy Wedding, Our Hero
She got along so well with Shakespeare last time that Gwyneth Paltrow is back for a second helping. This time it's "As You Like It," which opened last week at the prestigious Williamstown Theatre Festival in the Berkshires. Though she plays the same...
Health Notes, Don't Rest That Back, Itching for a New Look, Yet Another Reason to Love Chocolate, the Cutting Edge
When lower-back pain strikes, the natural response is to lie still and moan, but exercise may provide more relief. The latest evidence comes from England, where researchers assigned 197 chronic sufferers to one of two groups and followed them for a...
HOT PROPERTY, the Internet, with Accents, Read This before You Buy (Online), Being There: Table Tennis-With a Ball You'll Never Lose
Tiger Electronics' new laser-tennis game is perfect for kids or a cluttered office in an Internet start-up. Using a bright red "laser" beam, two players (or one) armed with reflective racquets lob the roving light across the board amid techno sound...
In Search of the Blair Witch: A Journalist Heads into the Woods near Burkittsville, Md
"The Blair Witch Project" has drawn fans to its setting in Burkittsville (population: 214). I went to check out the scene. Day One: 5:00 p.m. Assigned to do a story on "Blair Witch Project" phenomenon. 5:01 Check movie times. 8:00 Get to cineplex....
Iowa Clears Its Throat: Saturday's Straw Poll in Ames Could Be the Beginning of the End of Some Candidacies
Brooding, sphinxlike Iowa is about to speak. Well, maybe as much as seven tenths of 1 percent of Iowa's voting-age population will speak in Ames this Saturday. There may be as many as 15,000 card-carrying Iowans (this year, for the first time, they...
Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye, Coming to Terms with a Tragedy, Worried and Wired
Our July 26 special report on the deaths of John F. Kennedy Jr., his wife, Carolyn, and her sister Lauren drew close to 500 responses, mostly somber in tone. While some readers griped about the intense media coverage of the tragedy, most told us how...
Making Small Planes Safer: Science Looks for Ways to Keep Pilots from Getting Disoriented
Anyone who's flown in an airplane has felt the odd, disconnected sensation of looking out the window and seeing that the plane is banking into a turn, and yet knowing that the floor of the cabin is still solidly "down." It's called spatial disorientation,...
Perspectives
"IT IS HARDER TO GET A PRESCRIPTION FILLED THAN TO BUY A HANDGUN." LOCAL MINISTER REV. DON HARP, DURING A MEMORIAL SERVICE IN ATLANTA FOR VICTIMS OF THE RECENT OFFICE MASSACRE "THIS IS WHAT SCOUTING TAUGHT ME: GOODNESS WILL PREVAIL." JAMES DALE,...
Rage of the American Male: Only a Few Deranged Men Go on Shooting Sprees, but Many Feel Cheated That the System Has Let Them Down. and, in Some Powerful Ways, It Has
A man who responds to financial reversal by whacking his wife and kids to death and gunning down a score of people is not someone you'd want to confuse with an average American. Yet, in the aftermath of Mark O. Barton's murderous rampage through two...
Senator Springer? TV's Smutmeister Toys with a Bid from Ohio
They laughed when Jesse Ventura, the pro wrestler who favored feather boas and pink tights, ran for governor in Minnesota. Now they're howling at the idea that TV talk-show host Jerry Springer--the maestro of "Stripper Wars" and "I'm Sleeping With...
Stuck in the Spin Cycle: How Hillary's Unvarnished Take on Her Husband's Past Became the Talk of the Town
The debut issue of Tina Brown's magazine Talk runs 254 pages. But page 174 made all the news. Hillary Clinton's startling assertion that her husband was "scarred by abuse"--and her apparent attempts to partly blame his philandering on his unhappy childhood--sent...
The Big Bang Is Back: A High-Powered Physics Experiment Promises to Turn Back the Clock to a Microsecond after the Birth of the Universe
This is probably not the way the world ends: sometime this fall, researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory will tap a few commands into a computer terminal, bringing their new particle accelerator--the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, or RHIC--up...
The Blair Witch Cult: Two Young Filmmakers Have Set the Summer-And the Box Office on Fire with a Creepy Tale Audiences Love or Hate. the Making, and Marketing, of a Stealth Smash
By the time the lights went down, a few minutes into the morning of Jan. 24, the Sundance Film Festival crowd was ready for a good scare. For weeks there'd been buzz about a grainy little horror movie called "The Blair Witch Project," by two unknown...
The Funeral-Home Flap: Trouble for a Texas Mortician with Links to the Bush Family
When Texas regulators launched a probe into funeral homes last year, Houston mortician Robert L. Waltrip fought back. A tough-talking tycoon, Waltrip is chief executive of Service Corporation International (SCI) Inc., which owns more funeral homes...
The Spies in Your Pocket: Your Financial Privacy Is Rapidly Fading Away as Marketers Peer into Your Accounts
When we worry about who might be spying on our private lives, we usually think about the Feds. But the private sector outdoes the government every time. It's Linda Tripp, not the FBI, who's facing charges under Maryland's laws against secret telephone...
They're Outta Here! in One of Baseball's Strangest Calls, Umpires Eject Themselves, Then Try to Reverse Their Own Judgment
Give those umpires some credit. In the greedy, spoiled-rotten world of Major League Baseball, the 68 men in blue have managed to make the players and owners actually look like the good guys. Next to the Cubbies' winning the World Series, what could...
Too Much Privacy Is a Health Hazard: Efforts to Keep Medical Records Secret Can Deprive Doctors of the Information They Need to Help You
Most patients like what they see on the computer monitor on my desk. There are lists of their medications and medical problems, laboratory results and reminders to do mammograms. They are impressed that all the doctors at our hospital work with the...
Tropical and Topical: The Versatile Guayabera Is 1999's Bowling Shirt the Hippest Way to Go out Clubbing, or Even to a Wedding
You see them everywhere: on dapper Cuban gentlemen in Miami, on young hipsters in New York nightclubs and on accountants out for a stroll in Santa Monica. The ornate, four-pocket shirts are the standard outfit for business, social and formal occasions...
Valley of the Doll-Less: Surfing the Web for Dates in America's Tech Zone
Even millionaires like Bill Cleary can have trouble meeting women. The 52-year-old cofounder of the technology-communications firm CKS was recently divorced. So when it came time to start dating again, he headed to the hottest singles scene in Silicon...
When Managed Care Means Mediocre Care: A Simple Sprain Sent Me into the Maze of My HMO Plan. Months Later I Found Help outside the System
It's a cold January night in the upper Midwest as the airport van skitters over icy-slick roads to take us Californians to our various hotels. We met only an hour before in the airport but are already joking about going to Lourdes to take the waters....
Why McCain Voted for a 'Junk' Bill, Home Remedy, Take a 'Titanic' or a Bailout, We're History!, What I Did on My Vacation, Pants, Interrupted: Leg Warmers, the Hall of Fame Numbers Game, Claw vs. Claws, Building Up, Not out, Reaches New Heights, Twilight South
On a recent bus trip through South Carolina, GOP presidential candidate Sen. John McCain said privately that he was leaning toward voting against the GOP pet $800 billion tax-cut bill. "The thing is full of special-interest outrages," he said. "Junk."...
Wrestling for Dollars: What Are Body Slams Worth on Wall Street?
In the heat of battle, "Stone Cold" Steve Austin, the antihero of the wildly popular World Wrestling Federation, often bellows, "you're a-- is mine!" Soon, fans of professional wrestling can claim a share of his bulky hide. The WWF is leaping from...