Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 5

Air Travel: Don't Settle for 'C+' on Security
Even after the Sept. 11 attacks, the nation's aviation-security system leaks like a colander. Although endless lines at many airports suggest that airlines have now embraced security as their top priority, last week a traveler carried a loaded derringer...
Books: Errors and 'Corrections': Brash Best Seller Stumbles into a Dustup with Oprah
The one thing that Jonathan Franzen and everyone else agree on is that Jonathan Franzen should have kept his big mouth shut. Franzen's new novel, "The Corrections," had gotten an extraordinary parade of glowing reviews, though NEWSWEEK's Malcolm Jones...
Camcorder Confusion: OK, So You Want a Digital Camcorder. Where Do You Start? Devin Gordon Takes the Plunge
Would it kill electronics manufacturers to use actual words when naming their products? In the digital-camcorder market, each of the big boys--Canon, Sony, Panasonic, JVC--offers an affordable, first-rate model. Here are their names: ZR25 MC, DCR-TRV130,...
Chemical Plants: Go Well beyond 'Well Prepared'
Pathogens may have to be "weaponized" to turn them into agents of mass destruction, but industrial chemicals already are. They "provide terrorists with effective and readily accessible materials to develop improvised explosives, incendiaries and poisons,"...
Coming Together in an Age of 24/7: Worried about Saturation Coverage? Don't Be. Americans Have Always Been Obsessed with the Big Story-And Risen to the Occasion
You people are overdoing this thing," a close friend said to me recently about the media coverage since Sept. 11. "You've got people really scared," she persisted. "Maybe it was on your show, I can't remember. You know, I'm watching seven hours of...
Companies Are Maxed out Too: Here Is (Unfortunately) Another Negative for the Economy: Corporate Debt Problems Are Growing
Jerry Jasinowski doesn't need new problems. As president of the National Association of Manufacturers, he already has a surplus. Industrial production has dropped for 12 consecutive months, the longest stretch since late 1944 and 1945. Manufacturing...
Computer Networks: Back Up Firewalls with Strong Crypto
Viruses that wipe out your hard drive are the least of it. Phone networks, the power grid, the financial system, airport security, the 911 system, gas and oil pipelines and of course the Internet (more valuable now that snail mail is suspect) run on...
'Do First Things First': Peres on Bin Laden, Iraq, Tensions with America and Problems with Arafat
When Israeli tanks and troops rumbled into Palestinian-controlled areas of the West Bank, alarms sounded in Washington. The State Department, worried that Israeli actions could help Osama bin Laden by inflaming the "Muslim street," called on Israel...
Food Supplies: Bar Handling by 'Almost Anyone'
Everybody eats. That makes the nation's food supply, both domestic and imported, enough of a possible terrorist target, Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy Thompson told Congress last week, to justify significantly greater security measures....
Health Notes
HEALTH NOTES IRRADIATION Mail Scrubbers With corporate mailrooms on edge, companies that sterilize food and medical equipment are branching out into packages and envelopes. A Belgian company called Ion Beam Applications has 28 sterilization centers...
Heeeeeeere's Harry! with but a Few Weeks Left to Wait, Potter Fans Are Primed for the First Installment of the Indomitable Lad's Adventures
Brendan Vinnicombe lives, breathes and trick-or-treats Harry Potter. The 8-year-old has read all four of J. K. Rowling's books (and no, you may not borrow any of them). He also owns a Harry Potter backpack, sleeps under a Harry Potter poster and puts...
I Need Scientists! the Anthrax War Caught Washington off Guard. Behind the Crisis-And What Bush's Team Is Learning
Tommy Thompson had to see the president--right away. The secretary of Health and Human Services had just gotten the latest test results on the anthrax found in Sen. Tom Daschle's office, and the bottom line now was clear. The stuff was sophisticated...
Inside 'People Smuggling': It Isn't Hard to Get Yourself out of Afghanistan. A Firsthand Account
Using airstrikes and commando raids, Washington aims to pin down Al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan and then smoke them out. Better hurry. In the past two months between 150 and 200 Arab "holy warriors"--from Osama bin Laden's core following--have...
'It's Not Your Fault': A Deceptive Disorder Known as PCOS Makes Women Feel Guilty about Obesity and Some Peculiar Health Problems
For 13 years doctors told Sonnet Fitzgerald that she was healthy. They told her so the year she celebrated her 9th birthday and began rapidly gaining weight, putting on a hundred pounds by the end of middle school. They told her again when she was...
Mac Music: Apple May Be Late to the MP3 Market, but Its New iPod Device for the Macintosh Laps the Field. Can Quality Alone Guarantee Success? BY Steven Levy
Steve Jobs is breathless, as if he's just run a marathon. In fact, he's making this phone call only minutes after a different form of exertion--one of his patented launch events. This time the high-tech tour de force is not a computer but a small white...
Mass Transit: Study the Lessons of Aum Shinrikyo
Mass transit systems--enclosed, easy to reach, unsecured and packed--are clearly potential targets. Members of Japan's Aum Shinrikyo cult, who killed 12 and injured 5,500 in 1995 when they popped bags of sarin with umbrellas and released the deadly...
Movies: Scare the Heck out of 'Shrek'? A 'Monster'-Size Race for the First Animated-Feature Oscar
Shoulder to shoulder, they stride in heroic slow motion into the hangarlike factory, backlit like the space cowboys in "The Right Stuff." Except these fierce, determined guys look weird. One of them is eight feet tall with turquoise and purple fur;...
Moving on, despite an Uncertain Future: When Personal Trauma and National Tragedy Strike in the Same Week, Defiant Optimism Is the Best Response
For most women, being engaged is a delightfully happy time. But as I sat in the Surgical Specialties unit of Stanford Hospital, I just felt cold and alone. The blue paper gown was uncomfortable, and I fidgeted as I waited for the surgeon and the results...
Newsmakers
A Solitary Skater It's like the Yankees deciding to play the World Series without Joe Torre. Just four months before the Salt Lake City Olympics, where she's favored to win a gold medal, Michelle Kwan announced her split from longtime coach Frank...
New York State of Mind: 'Sex and the City' Is Their Day Job. but at Night, Sarah Jessica Parker and Cynthia Nixon Really Act Out
Ever wonder how the "Sex and the City" actresses manage to deliver those filthy lines without dying of embarrassment? Maybe it's because Sarah Jessica Parker and Cynthia Nixon have weathered far more humiliating moments in their real lives. Like the...
Nuclear Power Plants: Keep Building on Three Mile Island
The reactor chambers of commercial nuclear power plants are among the strongest structures ever engineered, rigid hemispheres of reinforced concrete up to five feet thick, designed to stand up to storms, earthquakes--and, as a spokesman for the Nuclear...
Patient Power: 'Above and beyond Just Doctoring': In an Age of Assembly-Line Care, Nurse Practitioners Take Time to Listen to Patients and Counsel Them
There's no shortage of doctors in Pittsburgh. And with her good health coverage, Meredith Wills could see almost any of them. But the 25-year-old law-school grad prefers to visit nurse practitioner Mona Counts in Mt. Morris, Pa., a 55-mile drive south....
Periscope
THE INVESTIGATIONS The Threat of an Al Qaeda Go Order Are the FBI's frantic efforts to crack the anthrax case diverting resources away from its war on Osama bin Laden and his organization, Al Qaeda? Increasingly, investigators suspect domestic extremists--not...
Perspectives
"We don't have the answers." Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge, on who is behind the anthrax attacks and how they obtained the pathogen "You know, enough's enough." Mets fan Chris McGlynn, who lost his Wall Street job as a sales trader...
Pixel Envy: Superhigh Resolution: Do You Need It in a Camera? Jennifer Tanaka Thinks Not
That thumping sound you hear is the march of technology. Just when consumers were getting comfortable with the idea of digital photography, the industry is assailing us with yet another upgrade. Over the summer, a handful of camera makers (notably...
Postal Delivery: Pony Up to Cure Mailroom Anthrax
In all the volumes of all the studies over all the years on "homeland security," the mail was never identified as a prime terrorist target. If it had been, then we might have had experiments--rather than reassuring pronouncements based on little more...
Protecting America: The Top 10 Priorities: A NEWSWEEK Special Report Assesses the State of Our Security in the Face of Terrorist Attacks and Offers Concrete Steps for Making the Country a Safer Place to Live
The turning point was a long time coming. In the weeks before, federal officials had speculated that the victim of the first, fatal case of anthrax by mail had been exposed to the deadly microbe while drinking out of a stream in North Carolina. They...
Public Places: Play Ball, but Ban the Backpacks
A year ago, three cops posing as terrorists infiltrated Phoenix's Bank One Ballpark, where the 2001 World Series opened over the weekend. One of the stadium's 106 surveillance cameras spotted the trio, and within minutes the park was crawling with...
Remembering Terror, 1988: How the Families of Pan Am 103 Bonded Together to Fight Back
On Dec. 21, 1988, Pan Am flight 103, a 747 bound from London to New York, exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing all 259 people aboard and 11 on the ground. Until this year, it was the deadliest terror attack ever on American civilians. But the...
Skyscrapers: Take the 'Immune Building' Challenge
In 1997, agents sprayed a quarter cup of a spore-filled aerosol into the air-conditioner return vent of a cavernous, convention-hall-like building. Within four hours, the spores had contaminated the air thoroughly enough to infect thousands of people...
Teen Talkathon: The New Phones Are as Popular as Handheld Videogame Systems
If you had to guess, how do mobile phones rate with teenagers, compared, say, with having a boyfriend or girlfriend? Or with partying? The answer, says a new survey by Teenage Research Unlimited (TRU), a market-research firm specializing in the Old...
The Second Time Around: Here's the Next Generation of the Pocket PC System. Is It an Improvement? Ask ERIK SHERMAN
Is that a PC in your pocket, or are you just glad to see your contact list? Take out your PDA. Is it the right one? There are two systems. First came the Palm: a device that keeps contacts, calendars and notes in a lightweight package. It does a few...
The X-Factor: With Its Eagerly Awaited Xbox, Microsoft Gets into the Videogame- Console Business
May you live in interesting times, an old Chinese curse says. Microsoft may soon discover what that means. On Nov. 15 its $299 videogame console called Xbox comes out, to go head-to-head against Sony's PlayStation 2 and the Nintendo Gamecube, to be...
Time to Think about Torture: It's a New World, and Survival May Well Require Old Techniques That Seemed out of the Question
In this autumn of anger, even a liberal can find his thoughts turning to... torture. OK, not cattle prods or rubber hoses, at least not here in the United States, but something to jump-start the stalled investigation of the greatest crime in American...
Uncle Sam and Aunt Samantha: It's Simple Fairness: Women as Well as Men Should Be Required to Register for the Draft
One out of every five new recruits in the United States military is female. The Marines gave the Combat Action Ribbon for service in the Persian Gulf to 23 women. Two female soldiers were killed in the bombing of the USS Cole. The Selective Service...
Warlords: For Sale or Rent: Victory May Take Bribes as Well as Bullets. the Culture of Afghanistan's Fickle Power Brokers
Abdul Haq was, as an earlier generation of diplomats and spymasters might have put it, "our kind of warlord." The scion of an Afghan upper-class family, he organized underground resistance in Kabul against Soviet domination during the 1980s. At a White...
Water Supplies: Make Safeguards Go with the Flow
In the Spring of 1993, Milwaukee was staggered by the nation's largest outbreak of waterborne disease. Cryptosporidium, a protozoan, passed undetected through two water-treatment plants and, once it reached customers' taps, caused more than 400,000...