Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 20

An Audio Daily Double: Jeopardy Celebrates 4,000th Episode
Factoid-gathering geeks rejoice: on May 15, "Jeopardy!" celebrates its 4,000th episode by devoting an entire show to clips from the past 18 years. This special caps a two-week run of the new Million Dollar Masters Tournament, which also features some...
Are Body Scans a Scam? Is a Body Scan Worth All the Time and Money?
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley and Karen Springen Dr. Craig Bittner wants to save your life, and he believes he has just the tool. In the time it takes to perform a traditional chest X-ray, any one of his four AmeriScan Body Imaging Centers can generate...
A Terrifying Road Trip: A College Kid Suspected of Trying to Paint the Country a 'Smiley Face' with Pipe Bombs Rattles the Midwest
Byline: Kevin Peraino The red-barn countryside of Iowa, idealized by Grant Wood, ought to qualify as a place free from chaos. It should be a place where Delores Werling, a 70-year-old farmer's wife, can walk out of the family's white foursquare...
Attack of the Groans: George Lucas Has Always Had a Golden Touch-And a Tin Ear. His Latest Installment of 'Star Wars' Is Far, Far from Great
Byline: David Ansen Yes, it's better than "the Phantom Menace." Yes, the 24-frame high-definition digital photography looks swell. Yes, though Yoda has graduated from puppet to fully computerized Jedi Knight his gnomish appeal is still intact. ...
Beating a Bad Rap: Combs on J. Lo, Fame and Trying to Clear His Name
It's a couple of hours before showtime in Orlando, Fla. Justin Timberlake, of 'N Sync, wanders into Sean (P-Diddy) Combs's dressing room looking for a dose of Combs's mysterious "energy drink." Judging from the bottles on the table, the drink is made...
Bye-Bye, 'American Pie': With 'About a Boy,' the Weitz Brothers Graduate from Gross-Out School and Try Their Hand at Brit Wit
Byline: Devin Gordon Chris and Paul Weitz want you to know that they loved directing "American Pie." They're proud of the final result, proud that it became a teen-comedy classic. But there are downsides to making a movie in which a horny teenager...
Choose Your Weapons: Rumsfeld's Bid to Kill the Crusader Is the First Step in His Campaign to Modernize the Military-The Opening Shot in a Long War with His Own Troops
Byline: John Barry George W. Bush never served in Congress, and he doesn't feel especially at home around rank-and-file members. When he wants to charm or scold Capitol Hill, he tends to call on House and Senate leaders and let them spread the word....
Desktop Dieting: Is the Internet the Answer to Losing Those Extra Pounds?
Byline: Katherine Stroup If the idea of squeezing back into your bathing suit gives you the willies, try logging on to your computer. It worked for Cristina Bavasi. The 31-year-old New Yorker yo-yoed on Weight Watchers and Jenny Craig before...
Gays and the Seminary: The Schools That Train U.S. Priests Require Students to Be Chaste, but Most Allow Them to Be Gay. A Vatican Probe May Change All That
Byline: David France There will never be a gay students' group--or gay film series or gay dance--at St. John's Seminary, one of the most respected training grounds for Catholic priests in the nation. Yet the 64-year-old institution, nestled in the...
Gunning for A Bad Book: Is Author Michael Bellesiles Trying to Prove That the Pen Is Mightier Then the Gun?
Byline: George Will In a large event, much commented on, the Justice Department last week told the Supreme Court that the Second Amendment ("A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep...
High Time: Despite the Attacks on the World Trade Center, Buildings Are Reaching for the Sky-At Least in Asia and Europe. the Trend Is Leaving U.S. Developers in the Lobby
Byline: Jerry Adler Donald Trump, the world's most Trumpian developer, has threatened several times to erect the world's tallest building, and last year he tried again, on a prime riverfront site in Chicago. The plan was for a "mixed use" project...
Inside the Siege of Bethlehem: Snipers, Militants, Vandals and Priests: Everyone Had a Story from the Siege of Bethlehem. Here Are the Tales of Four
Byline: Joshua Hammer Inside the Basilica of the Church of the Nativity, the stench of 150 unwashed human bodies mingled with the reek of fecal matter. The halvah, cans of lentils, chocolate bars and Marlboro Lights had run out days before, and...
In the Name of God: Religious Texts Have Long Been a License to Kill Your Foes in the Holy Land
Byline: Christopher Dickey Amid the wanton slaughter of 40,000 Muslims and Jews, Christian knights "rode in blood up to their knees and bridle reins," reported a witness to the Crusaders' conquest of Jerusalem in 1099. "It was a just and splendid...
Islamic Cyberterror: Not a Matter of If but of When
Byline: Mark Hosenball Al Qaeda terrorists interested in computer hacking are only a few clicks away from a crash course in digital sabotage. A Web site operated by the Muslim Hackers Club offers tutorials in cybermischief: viruses, hacking stratagems,...
Marin County, Hippie Haven? Not Quite. Believe That We're Granola-Crunching Loons If You Must. Just Be Sure to Pronounce the Name Right
Byline: Jim Kennedy Life here north of the Golden Gate has grown tougher recently. One day we were quietly enjoying the golden sunset, sipping decaf soy lattes and debating the merits of tofu versus veggie burgers. Then a former resident named John...
NBC's Real Fear Factor: Jeff Zucker Has to Keep NBC on Top. It Isn't the Worst Problem to Have, but Could You Please Find Another Hit like 'Friends'?
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts Coming to a small screen near you: "Kingpin," a gritty, riveting drama about a Latin American drug cartel run by the kind of murderers who mail the severed head of a drug agent to his colleagues back at the office. Send...
Newsmakers: This Week: Mariah Carey and David Duchovny
A Butterfly Tries to Spread Her Wings First there was the breakdown, then the breakup and now the breaking deal. Some considered Mariah Carey's career over after last year's mental meltdown and ill-fated stretch with Virgin Records (it bought out...
Perspectives
"I found that the cardinal had some selective amnesia." Alleged victim Mark Keane, after Cardinal Bernard Law testified he did not remember receiving letters accusing priest John Geoghan of sexual abuse "We were two different kinds of people. What...
Press 1 to Cut Short Your Life: The Downward Spiral of Customer Service
Byline: Jonathan Alter Some health risks are more immediate than others: Saddam Hussein has weapons of mass destruction, an ice shaft bigger than Manhattan has plummeted into the sea near Antarctica, signaling global warming... and I'm still on...
Prime-Time: It Might Just Be the Toughest Job in Hollywood: Fixing ABC. Why Susan Lyne Isn't Selling Her New York Apartment Just Yet
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts To: Network Brass. Re: Hot Fall Pilot. How's this for a pitch? Think "Murphy Brown'' meets "Network.'' A journalist turned up-and-coming TV exec gets to show the big boys what's what when the network puts her in...
Rising from the Ashes: Ground Zero Has Finally Been Cleared. Now Comes the Hard Part. What Will Be Built There-And Who Will Decide?
Byline: Cathleen Mcguigan On a lovely spring Saturday, half a dozen people were hunched over a map of lower Manhattan, with architects' tracing tissue stretched across it. They took turns sketching feverishly: a swath of green marker here for a...
Show Me the Money (All of It): Changes Need to Be Made to Account for Stock Options, and Showing the Value of Chief Executives' Compensation Packages
Byline: Allan Sloan Watching corporate America these days is like watching drunks at a revival meeting. They're vowing to sin no more, to tell shareholders the straight truth instead of playing accounting games, to embrace "transparency" so outsiders...
Spend It Now, Mr. President: What Bush Should Do about the Middle East
Publisher clarification: May 23, 2002 In his May 20 column "Spend It Now, Mr. President," Fareed Zakaria referred to the "late Teddy Kollek." We are glad to report that Kollek is very much alive. ____________________________ Byline: Fareed Zakaria...
The Carly Way: HP's CEO Reflects on the Battle to Acquire Compaq and Spells out Her Plans for the Tech Giant's Future
Byline: Brad Stone What a difference a month makes. Last March, at a college auditorium in Cupertino, Calif., disgruntled retirees and employees of Hewlett-Packard gathered to cast their votes and voices against the proposed merger of the 63-year-old...
Unheeded Warnings: FBI Agent's Notes Pointed to Possible World Trade Center Attack
Byline: Michael Isikoff The FBI has insisted it had no advance warning about the 9-11 attacks. But internal documents suggest there were more concerns inside the bureau's field offices than Washington has acknowledged. One FBI memo, written by a...
Will the Blogs Kill Old Media? One Blog Avatar Has Formally Wagered That by 2007, More Readers Will Get Their News from Blogs Than from the New York Times
Byline: Steven Levy A year ago, Glenn Reynolds hardly qualified as plankton on the punditry food chain. The 41-year-old law professor at the University of Tennessee would pen the occasional op-ed for the L.A. Times, but his name was unfamiliar to...