Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 127, No. 9, February 26

A Bishop in the Dock: A Heresy Trial for Ordaining a Noncelibate Gay
NEXT WEEK, FOR ONLY the second time in history, a bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church faces trial for heresy. Retired Bishop Walter Righter, 72, has been charged by 10 bishops with knowingly or daining a noncelibate homosexual, Barry Stopfel, as...
All Eyez on Me
TUPAC SHAKUR SEEMS TO love trouble. He courts it, thrives on it. If there's a feud to be had, Tupac will dive in. How about a feud with Biggie Smalls, a rival gangsta rapper whom Tupac just doesn't like? "It's obvious that Biggie stole my sound," he...
An Election Fantasy: If It Is All Going to Be Settled So Soon, We Could Start over and Do It Right
I HAVE BEEN HAVING A POLITICAL FANTASY. I AM AWARE that it is untrue, but it has been life-sustaining to me in this season of ghastly pre-election pawing and snorting. It is that the whole presidential contention we are now witnessing will be over in...
An Outsider's Inside Moves: The Story Behind the Plaid Shirt - and How Lamar Alexander Made Millions in Cozy Financial Deals
AMAR ALEXANDER'S PLAID shirts come from Wal-Mart--but the concept came from Bailey Deardourff, and therein hangs a tale. It goes back to 1977 when Alexander, an up-and-coming Nashville lawyer, got the itch to make a second run for governor of Tennessee....
Anyone but Boris; Yeltsin Runs Again, Starting Far Behind the Communists; but after All His Posturing, It Isn't Clear Where He Will Take the Country, Even If He Wins
HIS ECONOMY IS STILL struggling. He is trapped in a no-win war against Chechen rebels. His government reeks of crime and corruption. He has fired all the important liberals in his cabinet, and sometimes he acts more like an authoritarian than a democrat....
Back from the Ruins; Can This Be an African Nation That Works?
IT'S JUST THE KIND OF RECONSTRUCTION project that can ensnarl a Third World government. The narrow-gauge railroad that snakes from the Red Sea port of Massawa up a dramatic escarpment to the Eritrean capital, Asmara, was an engineering marvel when the...
Back to the Woodshed: As Washington Knocks Heads to Safeguard the Peace Deal, NATO Raids a Secret Iranian Base
THE RAID WAS REHEARSED FOR weeks, but took only moments to execute. A U.S. Special Forces Black-hawk helicopter swooped down on a snow-covered former ski chalet 20 miles west of Sarajevo and dropped a NATO unit of 10 French commandos. The point man took...
Bombing from the Air: Weak on the Trail, Dole Is Now the Candidate of the Attack Ad. It May Be His Best Shot
SENATOR DOLE, YOU ARE BETter than your negative ads," Lamar Alexander said in last week's demolition-derby debate. Alexander was road-testing his passive-aggressive theme (translation: Dole's a war hero but too old and mean), and it was working. Yet...
Chocolate Grenades: A Generous American Soldier with Extra Food Can Work Wonders in Bosnia
THE OTHER DAY AN 18-YEAR-OLD GI FROM THE FIRST Armored Division fired one of the first chocolate bars of the American peacekeeping mission at a kid in Bosnia who asked for a bondon. It hit its smiling target without mishap. If all's quiet on the Balkans...
Damaging Damage Control: New, Inside Whitewater Notes Depict a Panicked White House. Did the First Lady Mislead the Staff?
EMBARRASSING RECORDS LONG UNder subpoena have been popping up all over the White House. Consider what just happened to the candid, sometimes profane notes of a pair of top Clinton aides who were on the administration's Whitewater "response team" when...
For the Obsessed, the Mind Can Fix the Brain
TO JOSEPH DEE, THIS WAS REALITY: someone was lying limp at the bottom of the Los Angeles hotel pool. As the security guard responsible for locking the pool each night, Joseph, now 28, so obsessed over this image "that every night I would go back as much...
Heidi Fleiss Hollywood Madam
WATCHING NICK BROOMFIELD'S fascinating Heidi Fleiss Hollywood Madam, with its parade of pimps, madams, hustlers, call girls, informers and cops, you quickly catch on that nothing anyone says can be trusted. Everyone lies. Everyone's testimony is self-serving...
How Clinton Could Screw Up: The President's Making All the Right Moves, but His Successes Always Give Way to New Disasters
YOU ARE BILL CLINTON. YOU are back from a triumphant tour of Iowa. The crowds have been enormous and enthusiastic. Your speeches have been smooth, confident and uplifting. Meanwhile, the Republicans are in a world of hurt, shredding each other with negative...
Mary Reilly
THE LAST TIME DIRECTOR STEPHEN Frears collaborated with John Malkovich, author Christopher Hampton, producer Norma Heyman, cinematographer Philippe Rousselot and production designer Stuart Craig, the result was the marvelous "Dangerous Liaisons." This...
Mr. Smooth & Mr. Rough
A QUARTER CENTURY AGO, when they were young men on the make, they wore the prescribed uniform of the Nixon White House: white shirt, rep tie, close-cropped hair. They shared goal: building a Republican Party that would dominate politics, with the South...
Rent
DURING REHEARSALS OF HIS MUSIcal Rent, composer-writer-lyricist Jonathan Larson was told by his excited producers, "Jonathan, you're the new voice." Larson smiled: "Yeah? That's good." Hours after the dress rehearsal on Jan. 24, Larson, 35, was found...
'Roofies': The Date-Rape Drug: This Illegal Sedative Is Plentiful - and Powerful
OF ALL THE SUBSTANCES CHRIS, 18, has abused--including marijuana, cocaine, heroin and spray paint--there's only one he really didn't care for. Known on the street as "roofies," "rope," "the forget pill" and "roach," the drug is actually a sedative related...
The Buchanan Files: A Trail of Far-Right Friends and Harsh Words
WHAT CAN YOU TELL ABOUT A MAN BY THE FRIENDS HE KEEPS? LAST WEEK Pat Buchanan's campaign was jolted when it emerged that Larry Pratt, his friend and campaign cochairman, had attended rallies featuring neo-Nazis and white supremacists. In 1992 Pratt,...
The Eye of the Tiger; as He Prepares to Return to the Ring, Boxer Gabriel Ruelas Jogs, Spars and Tries to Deal with the Memory of Beating an Opponent to Death
MEXICAN COUNTRY MUsic blares in the small storefront gym on a scruffy side street in Van Nuys, Calif. On one side, Mr. T is lifting weights and gold chains in front of a mirror. In the back, a couple of boxing men are discussing the vagaries of football...
The Font of Youth
NOW READ THIS--OR TRY TO, ANYWAY: words in oddly mixed capitals and lowercase with some letters blurred, overlaid on photographs or crammed into little titling boxes. That's just a magazine page, which at least stands still. Try TV: the same, except...
The Hit Men
THERE'S SOMETHING DIFFERENT IN THE AIR THESE days when it comes to people's jobs. Yes, we've had corporate layoffs ever since business was invented. We've had greedy and isolated and insensitive chief executives that long, too. Not to mention hungry...
The Late Shift
WARREN LITTLEFIELD. HOWARD Stringer. Rod Perth. Who are these guys? TV executives, that's who. Why would we want to sit through a two-hour movie about a bunch of boring white men in suits? Because five years ago they played key supporting roles in the...
The Lawyer CEOs Love to Hate
JUST HOW MUCH DO THE HIGH-TECH folks in Silicon Valley hate Bill Lerach? They've called him "parasite," "leech," "vermin," "pond scum" and "the lowest form of life on earth." And those are the compliments. "Is he still alive?" asked Al Shugart, CEO of...
The Malling of Shania
WHEN SHANIA TWAIN steps out into the rotunda at the Mall of America in Minneapolis, the crowd lets off a whooshing roar as frantic as at any concert. More than 10,000 people are here to see her, and they fill the floor all the way back to the Stampede...
The Roots of Good and Evil: What Can Chimps Tell Us about Our Moral Nature?
IT'S A LAZY AFTERNOON IN LAWrenceville, Ga., and everything should be going Jimoh's way. As the top-ranking male in a group of 20 chimpanzees maintained by the Yerkes Primate Research Center, this muscular, black-haired 29-year-old is every female's...
Toasting the 'Hood
RICO'S EYES ARE POOLS OF black anger staring out from beneath a black ski cap. They are French eyes, but only in the most modern sense. Descended of Italian and Spanish Gypsy immigrants, they have negotiated a home in this place, changing it as they...
To Him, It Was Still 1988: The 'Coma Cop' Awakens
GARY DOCKERY'S FAMILY THOUGHT the end was finally near. For 71/2 years he had lain in a nursing home, sometimes grunting or grimacing and occasionally blinking his eyes. Now fluid was filling his lungs, and doctors said that if he didn't have surgery,...