Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 131, No. 9, March 2

Anybody Seen Any Samurai around Here? Japan's Hotshot Skiers Confound the Warrior Ethic
It's both a blessing and a curse that ski-jumper Masahiko (Happy) Harada is not a samurai-style sportsman. He's goofy and vulnerable and smiles all the time, even when he fails miserably. Like four years ago in Lillehammer, when he needed just a mediocre...
Are You Talking to Me?
Captain Kirk did it. So did "2001" astronaut David Bowman, the "Lost in Space" Robinsons and the cartoon Jetsons. They spoke to their computers and robots, and the machines actually understood and spoke back. After all, it was science fiction. ...
A Scare in the West: This Time It Wasn't Deadly - but a False Anthrax Alarm in Las Vegas Still Raises Worries about Terror at Home
The phone call came early Wednesday morning, and by midafternoon the FBI's Las Vegas office was mobilized to the max. This case, it seemed, had everything--a suspect known for his extremist political beliefs and fascination with biological weapons,...
A Warning on Sunscreen: A New Study Finds That Sunblocks Don't Protect Everyone from the Deadliest Form of Skin Cancer
For the last 20 years, americans have assumed that the way to have our sun and bake in it, too, was to slather on sunscreen. From waterproof lotions to sand-resistant oil, sun-care products accounted for almost $450 million in sales last year. But...
Buying or Selling a Home: Strategies to Maximize Gains, Minimize Expenses
The legacy of 1997 for 1998's taxes holds changes for those selling a home or buying one for the first time as well. If you sold your home last year, tax changes made in 1997 may retroactively benefit you when you file your taxes. If you sold your...
Capital Gains & Stock Options: When Should You Exercise?
The new capital gains rate affects any stock option you may have. Let's review the new capital gains rules and see how they can affect your decisions to exercise or hold your options. The maximum tax rate on profits from the sale of investment assets...
Did Saddam Blink
With U.S. forces poised to strike Iraq, the U.N.'s Kofi Annan said, he was close to a `breakthrough.' It was the last chance for peace in Clinton's toughest foreign crisis. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright loves to explain. With her big hats...
Dreams and Nightmares
They didn't have the big names or the NHL all-star reputations, but a homemade poster in Nagano's Big Hat arena got it exactly right: U.S. WOMEN--THE REAL DREAM TEAM. While their male counterparts stumbled and bumbled on Olympic ice--and trashed and...
Finland: Designer Nation
For 600 years, Finland was under the thumb of either Sweden or Russia; it didn't gain independence until 1917. Maybe that's why, of all the brands of modem Scandinavian design, Finland's is the most fiercely rooted in its own folk culture and indigenous...
Futurism - the Trendiest Profession
Back in 1987, Timothy Willard, then managing editor of The Futurist magazine, predicted that America's obsession with trend watching and futurism would explode as the millennium approached. Sure enough, the boom in futurism is on. Everywhere you look...
Hey, Ally, Ever Slain a Vampire?
Buffy the vampire slayer could whip Ally McBeal's butt. Harsh? Sure. But where Ally deals with problems by emoting to friends and hallucinating petty slights, Buffy copes by kick-boxing her problems and driving wooden stakes through their hearts,...
How Would Ally Do It?
Her name is Ally McBeal, and she's rapidly becoming the woman network execs have long lusted after: the '90s answer to Mary Tyler Moore. A Harvard law graduate with a promising career, 27-year-old Ally has the ability to both inspire and repel. She...
It's Up to Iraq: The Secretary of State Explains Why America May Have to Launch Airstrikes
Last week, I traveled to college campuses to discuss U.S. policy towards Iraq with the American people. The experience brought me back to my days as a college professor. In Ohio, we met on a basketball court. Having taught at Georgetown, I should...
Longevity and Livability: There's a Growing Number of Oldsters Still Full of Creaking Vitality. Don't Begrudge Us Respect
There's a growing number of oldsters still full of creaking vitality. Don't begrudge us respect. I am a member of the generation that has outlived the conventional life span. We are often accused these days of threatening the financial stability...
Modern Living 101
Zesty Myers, 28, is an artist, professional glass blower and modem-furniture freak. Every weekend, the goateed, multi-earringed Myers and his partner, Evan Snyderman, 27, rise at dawn to truck their wares from their store, "R," in Brooklyn, N.Y.,...
Mrs. Dalloway
In a movie universe clanking with special effects, Mrs. Dalloway dares to luxuriate in art's greatest special effect: language, it's something of a miracle to succeed in adapting Virginia Woolf s landmark (and eternally popular) 1925 novel, written...
New Enemies for Kim: Management and Labor
The dirt road to Kim Dae Jung's birthplace leads to a vacant lot. Until recently, it seems, nobody on the windswept island where Kim grew up, Ha Eui, imagined that South Korea's most famous dissident would do them honor--much less be elected his nation's...
Pomp and Circuitry: Part Trade School, Part Boot Camp, a New College for Game Programmers Hits the Start Button
When Eric Smith told his friends that he was quitting his job to go to videogame college, they chuckled. His mom smirked. But he's serious. He's one of 40 students enrolled in a new four-year college solely for aspiring computer-game programmers,...
Pride of Baghdad: Iraq's Capital Takes Heart from the Spectacle in Ohio
The woman known simply as "Umgadaa," or "Mother of Gadaa," is by now a legend in Baghdad--a living memorial to a brief and bitter war. Her young daughter, Gadaa, was one of more than 400 women and children killed when American missiles destroyed the...
Ray of Light
Madonna may be turning 40 this year, but lately she's been acting like a teenager. At 2 a.m. on Valentine's Day she went onstage at a New York club, the Roxy, and performed three songs from her forthcoming album, "Ray of Light" (due in stores March...
Running for Cover
Here's the word according to Vernon Jordan. Last Dec. 19, Jordan had a crisis on his hands or, more specifically, in his office, a lawyer familiar with his story told Newsweek. Monica Lewinsky had dropped by to tell him that she'd just been subpoenaed...
Saddam's Secret World
Each day in Iraq, bodyguards knock on the front doors of more than a half-dozen homes. Then they announce: "You'll have a guest tonight." They allow the startled residents a few minutes to pack toothbrushes and a change of clothes before heading off,...
Tara's Joy
A brilliant performance by 15-year-old Tara Lipinski made her the youngest Olympic skating champion, beating favorite Michelle Kwan and setting up a rivalry for the millennium. When Michelle Kwan final trace in the ice last Friday, she stretched...
The Celebrity Counsel
For Bill Ginsburg, it was just another day on the media swoon circuit. On Super Bowl Sunday, Monica Lewinsky's attorney took in the game at the home of Wolf Blitzer, CNN's senior White House correspondent. Since then, Ginsburg, 54, has grown accustomed...
The Clinton Doctrine: By Confronting Iraq, Thr President Sets a Principle for the Next Century
President Clinton's showdown with Iraq represents that rarest of moments, when a presidential decision can define an era. It bears comparison with the Ultimatum that first sent me to war as a 23-year-old Marine lieutenant. When North Korea invaded...
The New Roth IRA: Is It for You?
It's 1998 now, but 1997 isn't totally in the past--there were many changes in last year's tax law that actually take effect in 1998, which in many cases will save you a good bit of cash. From my vantage point as National Director of Ernst & Young's...
The Problems with Privilege: It's a Dginified Doctrine, but the Current Fight over 'Executive Privilege' Is More about Hardball Than It Is about History
The environs were August (the federal courthouse in Washington) and the language lofty ("privilege" and "presidential prerogatives"). In reality, the standoff last week between President Clinton's lawyers and Kenneth Starr's prosecutors was an old-fashioned...
Unearthing the Truth
Dick Spertzel knew his trap would work, in December 1996 the leader of a United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM) team hunting for Iraq's hidden biological weapons went on what looked like a routine inspection. Saddam Hussein had finally admitted...
Watching Mike: For Milken's Probation Officer, the Case of a Lifetime Is Coming to a Close
Michael Milken has been waiting a long time. This week, after 12 years of fighting the U.S. justice system, he could be a free man. Milken's probation, which maximum term of five years, ends March 1. But the Feds, who have investigated Milken almost...