Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 19, November 9

An Armful of Agony
Drugs and therapy offer new hope for 'cutters' Stacy is a churchgoing midwest-erner, a 25-year-old secretary who wears cardigan sweaters and wire-rimmed glasses. She's the blond, blue-eyed girl next door--seemingly about as wholesome as they come....
Buying High, Selling Low?
DuPont didn't exactly hit a gusher in the oil biz Conoco inc., the giant oil com- pany that until recently was a wholly owned subsidiary of DuPont, blanketed the country with full-page ads last week celebrating its recent $4.4 billion stock offering....
Candid Castro
Today, it's hard not to see fidel cas- tro as a cold-war relic, clinging to his guerrilla fatigues and his anti-imperialist rants. But the rare images on these pages, from a new book by the father-and-son team of Osvaldo and Roberto Salas, capture...
Did Gadgets Go Awry?
Probing Swissair's entertainment system Passengers aboard swissair Flight 111 on Sept. 2 were to be treated to more than the usual peanuts and soda. The McDonnell Douglas MD-11 jumbo jet was equipped with a new, state-of-the-art computer entertainment...
Eject Button on Cynicism
Glenn, a giant from a monumental generation, is proving that there are no final missions Some firsthand experiences fail to live up to expectations; a shuttle launch is not among them. In the press grandstand where I watched Discovery rise against...
Giving Peace a Fresh Chance Netanyahu Dodges a Bullet, but Arafat Faces Real Trouble
If the suicide bomber had made it all the way to his target, the five-day-old Mideast peace deal might have been blown to bits, along with a school bus full of Israeli children. But at the last moment, an Israeli Army jeep cut into the path of the...
Jefferson's DNA Trail
Genetics shows he had at least one child with his slave The charge first surfaced in 1802, when Thomas Jefferson was president: he had fathered a child 12 years before with Sally Hemings, his mulatto slave. The rumor stuck to Jefferson's reputation...
New Life in the Brain
Startling proof that nerve cells regenerate may offer hope for an eventual Alzheimer's cure In some ways, "absolute truths" are the only challenges worth a scientist's time. Take, for instance, the long-held conviction that nerve cells in the brain...
Sitcom or Tragedy?
High drama and low ratings at 'Sports Night' Most college-grad tv writers have read Aristotle. Aaron Sorkin has the chutzpah to quote him, in defense of a sitcom no less. Sorkin is the creator and an executive producer of ABC's struggling "Sports...
Suddenly Sassa at NBC
Can a friendly cable guy save the network? Taken by annie leibovitz in 1994, it was one of those photographs that captures a moment--in this case, the popular adulation of media moguls. There they were, at an elite annual conference in Sun Valley,...
The Abortion Wars Come Home
A search for a sniper casts light on the shadowy world of hard-core protesters At many abortion clinics,business as usual means high security. So when Buffalo GYN Womenservice reopened last week, there was nothing out of the ordinary about volunteers...
The Bell Jar Tolls Death of a Poet Notorious for His Loves and Labors
Ted hughes, the most famous poet in the world, died last week of cancer at 68. Much of his fame was due not just to his extraordinary gifts or because he had been Britain's poet laureate since 1984. Hughes's marriage with Sylvia Plath became "the most...
The Cold War on Screen
CNN's megaseries has been attacked as slanted. No, it's vivid, revealing and mostly fair-minded. Ted turner has done it again. last year he pledged $1 billion to the United Nations, not America's favorite charity. Now he has plunged $12 million...
The Goldberg-Tripp-Jones Axis
The White House blames Clinton's potential perjury problem on the special prosecutor. But if there was a trap, it was set by women offstage, not by Starr. What inspired Linda Tripp to take the tapes of her phone conversations with Monica Lewinsky...
The Gospel from Science
The news from the cosmos is staggeringly improbable and theologically suggestive Soon the american civil liberties union, or people for the American Way, or some similar faction of liti-gious secularism will file suit against NASA, charging that...
The Hot New Tech Cities
Across America and around the world, hot spots are challenging Silicon Valley. Where to find the new jobs, the new wealth and the sheer fun of the Information Age today. * Austin, Texas * Bangalore, India * Boise, Idaho * Boston, Massachussetts...
The Mogul and Ms. Jones
An eccentric millionaire wades into Paula v. Bill The tv news crews asked to reshoot the thank-you scene. Paula Jones's voice, it seemed, was too tiny to be heard. Her sequin collar flashing in the camera lights at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington,...
Yeltsin's 'Soft Resignation'
Primakov takes over as Russia's leader gives in to illness For russian leaders through- out history, the Black Sea has always been a sanctuary, a warm spot far from Moscow's intrigues. On occasion, it has also been a political graveyard. In 1964...
'Zero-G and I Feel Fine'
Blasting into orbit, John Glenn restores romance to space--and reminds us all of headier days as he floats into history john glenn learned about daily life at zero-G during his first breakfast in space last week, when a piece of his oatmeal floated...