Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 18

A Big Birthday for Bill & Co. an Exclusive Interview with Softie Honchos Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer Straight from Their Big 25th-Anniversary Blast
Twenty-five years ago, Harvard sophomore Bill Gates and his buddy from high school Paul Allen saw a magazine article about the first personal computer and immediately began a two-person company to write software for it. "At one point Bill said to me,...
A Company under Fire: Did Firestone Do Enough to Protect Its Own Workers?
In April 1994, Robert Reich, then Labor secretary, flew to Oklahoma City to personally slap a $7.5 million fine against a tire factory. Reich was incensed about the death of a worker who had been fixing a tire-assembly machine when it suddenly turned...
A Hamiltonian Moment Again? Gore Is Wagering That the Nation Is Ready for the Boldest Federal Activism since 1965
On Aug. 28 Joseph Lieberman said: "Isn't Medicare coverage of prescription drugs really about the values of the Fifth Commandment: Honor your father and mother?" On Sept. 5 George W. Bush said: "By history and by choice, our nation makes a promise:...
A Master of Pool Science: Sleek Geek: He Studies the Physics of the Backstroke
When Lenny Krayzelburg was 8 years old, his swimming coach in Odessa, Ukraine, told his father: "Your son is born to be a backstroker." He had double-jointed elbows (like nearly every great backstroker) for a longer, more powerful pull. He had just...
An Amazon in Paris: At His Coming-Out Party in France, Bezos Inspires Fear, Loathing-And a Healthy Burst of Competition
Champagne glasses clinked merrily along the banks of the Seine as Jeff Bezos worked to make a splash that was huge, yet somehow low-key. The founder of Amazon.com knew it would be all too easy for the world's biggest, brashest bookseller to offend...
An 'Underdog' Bites Back: After a Month of Missed Opportunities and Mixed Messages, Bush Sharpens His Attack against Gore
The candidates were in Detroit--ground zero in a swing state. Both were upbeat, but only one had reason to be. The question is: which one? At first glance, that would seem to be Al Gore. Having risen to parity or more in the polls, he made an impromptu...
A Question of Profiling: Charges of 'Systematic' Discrimination at Energy
When it began nearly two years ago, the U.S. government's inquiry into Edward T. Fei's security status seemed routine if slightly puzzling. Fei has long been one of the Energy Department's top experts on nuclear proliferation--a senior if relatively...
Berkeley's New Colors; Berkeley's New Colors: What Happens When You Kill Affirmative Action? the Rapidly Morphing Student Body at a Leading University Offers One Answer
It's the first week of school at the University of California, Berkeley, and Sproul Plaza, the campus's main thoroughfare, is bustling with the usual lunchtime crowd: protesters clanging garbage-can lids and plinking cowbells; upperclassmen blaring...
Brown against Brown: As Hispanic Immigrants Flood into the South and Midwest, 'Mexicano' Workers Face Prejudice and Hostility-From 'Chicanos' Who Arrived Decades Earlier. A Report from the Front
Antonio Perez learned a few quick lessons when he arrived in Garden City, Kans., 10 years ago to take a job at a meatpacking plant. First: the most backbreaking and bloody work fell to the brown-skinned. In his case, it was to tear the hides off cattle...
Bush's Great Miscalculation: He Was Counting on Charm and Compassion, Forgetting That He'd Have to Explain His Ideas
The great paradox of this presidential election is that Al Gore is the "candidate of substance," while George W. Bush--the source of the campaign's few fresh ideas--is typecast as a hopeless dunce. For this, Bush is mainly to blame, and it could cost...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY A New Way to Take Your Music To Go In the '80s, b-boys walked the city streets carrying enormous boomboxes on their shoulders. Now e-boys have a music machine of their own: the $499 Nomad Jukebox from Creative. Barely larger than a portable...
Don't Be Fooled by the Little Knit Cap: Yes, I'm Jewish. and Yes, I Speak Hebrew. but You'd Be Surprised What My Yarmulke Doesn't Say about Me
I can tell by their tone what they will inquire about. They--strangers--are polite yet patronizing. They stammer, yet ask questions I'd never have the gall to vocalize. I usually know within seconds of meeting them that they will ask about the yarmulke...
Firing the Thorpedo: Gentle Giant: This Australian Teenager Is Poised to Make Olympic Swimming History
It will all be over in eight minutes--give or take a few hundredths--spread over the first four nights of the Olympics. That's how long Ian Thorpe will spend swimming the finals of his four events--a nine-foot-long blur of arms, legs and foam, wrapped...
Ford vs. Firestone: Firestone Was Aware of Tire Flaws Back in 1998, According to Documents Obtained by NEWSWEEK. and on the Car Front, Bill Ford Jr. Says His Company's Taken 'A Heck of a Hit.'
It was supposed to be a mission of mercy. Victor Rodriguez piled the family into his Ford Explorer over Labor Day weekend to visit a sick aunt at a Laredo, Texas, hospital. But as Rodriguez cruised down Interstate 35, he was startled by a thump and...
From Intern to Entrepreneur
Forget $20 an hour--that's pocket change for Syracuse University students Jason and Nathan Kuder. The brothers interned in the summer of 1999 at their older brother's start-up, NetVendor, and walked away with a cool $1.5 million. The two stumbled onto...
Goodbye, Shrink-Wrap: Software for Rent: ASPs: Tired of Constant Bugs, Costly Upgrades and Bloated Applications? the Computer Industry Thinks It Has the Solution
John Montz is happiest when his world is in total disrepair. The 47-year-old "building operating-system specialist" at Western Wyoming Community College is a fixer by trade--and by nature. He lovingly works on the school's air-conditioning system....
He's with the Band: Cameron Crowe Was Just 15 When He Hit the Road for Rolling Stone. the Director Relives His Youth in 'Almost Famous.'
The music-crazed hero of Cameron Crowe's "Almost Famous" can't quite believe his luck. Here he is, all of 15 years old, on the road with the rock-and-roll band Stillwater, and Rolling Stone is paying him good money to write about it. (The magazine...
Love without Borders: Americans Are Intermarrying like Never before, and They're Reshaping Life Couple by Couple. What Happens after the Wedding
Ah, weddings. the hair, the makeup, the layers of fabric. They're enough to frazzle the calmest of brides. But when Taiwanese-American Grace Tsai married Japanese-Canadian Richard Tsuyuki, she took wedding-day stress to a whole new level. After a Roman...
Mail Call
The Rats Weren't Only on the Menu Many readers of our Aug. 28 cover story on "Survivor" expressed scorn and even disgust for the TV series, including a number who thought the Russian-submarine tragedy deserved the cover. While a few admitted they'd...
MP3.com Gets Ripped: A Huge Penalty Could Threaten an Online Pioneer
Four out of five is a great average for a ballplayer; for a dot-com, it's potentially devastating. Last month Napster's compadre in goosing the recording industry, MP3.com, settled its copyright lawsuit with four of the five major record labels. For...
Newsmakers
Random Acts of Rage The MTV video music awards are more about pushing the envelope than opening it. And last week's ceremony lived up to its raucous reputation. Sure, some people got awards: Eminem--protested outside by gay-rights activists--was...
Periscope
RUSSIA Putin's Manhattan Makeover Vladimir Putin may not run a superpower, but he'd still like us to think he does. Never mind that the Russian president's popularity has sunk since the recent Kursk submarine disaster. Or that his government...
Perspectives
"It's a better picture. People don't get a sense of my ability to relate to people." George W. Bush, announcing that his campaign stops will now include more intimate gatherings of voters "Too many vulnerable communities in too many regions of...
Smart Choices: New Banks and New College-Savings Plans Are Giving Investors More for Their Money
Q: I'm interested in the high-rate certificates of deposit I see on the Internet. Some are yielding more than 7 percent. But how do I know that the institutions are legitimate? Names like nBank and Nexity Bank don't inspire confidence. George Smith,...
Taking Stock of Politics: There Are Few Things Wall Street Likes More Than a Presidential Campaign. Why It's a Good Policy to Play the Market in an Election Year
Pssst: Wanna bet on the election? Vegas is giving even odds on Al Gore and paying a measly 50 cents to the buck bet on George W. Bush, according to some gambling Web sites. But there's an easier way to put your money on the November contest: buy some...
The Kids in the Corner Office: Workplace: Flush with Offers of $20 an Hour, Benefits and Even Stock Options, Internet Interns These Days Are in the Driver's Seat
Working the summer before her senior year was a necessity for 20-year-old Kara Kotwas, who is paying her way through a computer-graphics-design program at Syracuse University. When she signed up for an internship, she expected not only hands-on experience...
The Last Picture Show? Theater Chains Are Finding Themselves in a Truly Scary Movie as Rampant Overbuilding Has Led to Problems
The films may not be getting any better, but the theaters sure are. When Misty Croughen and Dara Robertson of Ventura County, Calif., went to see "Nutty Professor II: The Klumps," they enjoyed stadium seating, gourmet snacks, handy cupholders, a choice...
The New Face of Race: Every Day, in Every Corner of America, We Are Redrawing the Color Lines and Redefining What Race Really Means. It's Not Just a Matter of Black and White Anymore; the Nuances of Brown and Yellow and Red Mean More- and Less-Than Ever. the Promise and Perils Ahead
America is busy writing new chapters every day. We are now in an Age of Color in which the nuances of brown and yellow and red are as important, if not more so, than the ancient divisions of black and white. With their precise distinctions about their...
Tomorrowland, Today: The Valley's Influx of Hyperachieving Techno-Migrants, along with a Swelling Hispanic Population, Creates a Microcosm of the Future
Were it not for the fact that the venture capitallist behind the lectern is petite and blond, the Network of Indian Professionals might just as well have been drawn from Bangalore as San Francisco. Hundreds of aspiring entrepreneurs listen raptly as...
Tuning out Dr. Laura: Do the Fierce Protests against Her New TV Talk Show Violate the Shock Doc's First Amendment Rights?
There is no progress without resistance." That's one of those "Lauraisms" that Laura Schlessinger, the radio scold better known as "Dr. Laura," must suddenly deplore. Even she could not have been prepared for the resistance by gays and feminists that...
Turmoil in a Charmed Life: Bill Ford's Tenure Running the Family Business Has Gone Swimmingly, until Now. the Tire Crisis Presents His First Big Test
Up to now it's been almost impossible for us mere mortals not to be wildly jealous of William Clay Ford Jr. Talk about leading a charmed life. Bill Ford is a wealthy, personable, self-possessed and seemingly unwarped member of one of the nation's leading...
Up from Jim Crow: It Was Called the Most Segregated City in America. the Past Still Reverberates in Birmingham, but It Is a City Determined to Escape the Legacy of Bull Connor
After all the years they echo still, the boom of dynamite and the rain of glass through the autumn leaves--just as some of the leading citizens of Birmingham, Ala., feared when, in the aftermath of the calamitous summer of 1963, they seriously debated...
'We Have the Power': Successful Black Women Are Rethinking and Challenging Old Racial Stereotypes and Assumptions. in an Exclusive Round Table, Activists, Entertainers, Scientists and Executives Talk about Where They've Been, Where They Are and Where They're Going
To get a sense of the issues facing black professional women, NEWSWEEK invited a handful of prominent "sisters" to talk about life: Cheryl Mills, the former deputy White House counsel and current vice president at Oxygen Media; Mae Jemison, former...
What's White, Anyway? the Question Is as Old as America Itself, and as the Country's Racial Barriers Erode, the Answer Is Changing Yet Again-While the Advantages of Whiteness Are Murkier Than Ever
In Argentina, where he was born, my acquaintance had always been on solid taxonomic ground. His race was no more a mystery than the color of the clouds. It was a fact, presumably rooted in biology, that he was as white as a man could be. But his move...