Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 18

A Cancer 'Smart Bomb': A New Drug Shows Hope of Conquering a Form of Leukemia by Targeting the Misbehaving Cells
Two summers ago, Douglas Jenson was so wiped out from battling Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) that he could do little more than sit by his window, watching the numbers on a thermometer rise and fall with the sun. Today, thanks to an experimental...
Barak Rolls the Dice: By Resigning, He Tries to Seize the Political Initiative
Ehud Barak had consulted with aides throughout the day, hearing their opinions but sharing his with no one. It was Saturday, and holding court at home on the Jewish Sabbath was exceptional for an Israeli leader. But this had been an exceptional week....
Chugging toward a Slowdown: How the Economy's Greatest Strength-Our Faith in the Boom-Could Become Its Biggest Vulnerability for the Next President and Federal Reserve Chief Alan Greenspan
The president-elect--whoever he is--cannot be watching the economy with much serenity. What's driven this economic boom has been confidence in the boom itself. People have acted as if it could go on forever, and they have spent accordingly. But we...
Climbing Up the Ladder: Folk Troubadour David Gray Has Built a Following the Old-Fashioned Way: Slowly
For a guy who moments ago had a tiny camera jammed up his nose and down his throat, David Gray sure is in a cheerful mood. It's early afternoon at "Saturday Night Live's" Manhattan studios, and this week's musical guest, the 32-year-old English folk...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY An Alice for Grown-Ups In American McGee's Alice ($50; Electronic Arts, 800-245-4525), a PC action-adventure game, Wonderland is a dangerous place ruled by an evil, twisted Queen of Hearts. Alice is not quite right, either, having been...
Disorder in the Courts: Judicial Rollercoaster: Bush vs. Gore Is Headed Back to the U.S. Supreme Court. Will the Fierce Legal Battles Finally Get Us a New President and End the Chaos-Or Ignite a Constitutional Crisis?
George W. Bush got his bad news first--last Friday in the living room of the governor's mansion. He watched in disbelief as the tube delivered the legal bulletin: the Florida State Supreme Court was ordering a full manual recount of 45,000 "undervotes"--a...
Election 2000: The Final Exam: Extra Credit for Those of You Who Can Count Votes and Know How to Spell 'Jurisprudence'
Well, kids, it's sure been a wild ride in the middle schools of America these last few weeks. One moment you're studying the Rough Riders or the Tories or the ways in which the cotton gin shaped the economy of the Southern states, and the next--bam!--you're...
E-Mail: The Future of the Family Feud? Misunderstandings, Delayed Responses. When We Fight Online, We Miss Our Chance for Real Resolution
A few months ago I had my first e-mail argument. I've heard about e-mail romances, but I didn't know how common e-mail fighting is--until I mentioned it to friends, who readily confessed their own online tiffs. My foray into Internet madness began...
Hit the Groove: An Animated Charmer
For a Disney animated movie, "The Emperor's New Groove" arrives on the Christmas scene as quietly as a mouse in padded slippers. Where's the usual brass band, the tie-in merchandise, the Emperor's New King-Size Burger? The lack of hype is refreshing,...
Legitimacy Goes in the Dock: The Supreme Court May End This, but Blocking a Final Recount Could Cloud a Bush Presidency
Standing in the small crowd outside the Florida State Supreme Court in Tallahassee last Friday, I had a flashback. Twenty-five years ago this fall, I was at Fenway Park when Boston Red Sox catcher Carlton Fisk hit a famous home run in the bottom on...
Letters
MAIL CALL One for the History Books Nearly 800 more letters on the Gore-Bush fight for the White House poured in last week, many pointing to the lessons learned from this year's election. "With Supreme Court petitions, demonstrations, unclear 'voter...
Lone Star Rap: Meet Houston's Rap Star South Park Mexican, the Biggest Sound out of the Southwest
The car-hopping contest is in full bounce at the Low-rider show in San Antonio, Texas's Alamo Dome. Tricked out Chrysler LeBarons and Toyota mini-trucks with bionic hydraulic systems compete to see whose front end can hop the highest, or shimmy the...
Newsmakers
Angelina Exposed Even when her brother isn't around, Angelina Jolie can be very provocative. She says that while playing cyberbabe-cum-motion-picture-heroine Lara Croft, she has fallen in love with her character's guns. "They're the things I'm most...
Now, Really Movable Type: Thanks to Electronic 'Ink,' Someday We'll Be Able to Fit a Whole Book on a Sheet Almost as Thin as Paper
The mind reels. think of it: ink that can change from bright white to dark and then to white again, simply by flipping a switch. Last month E Ink, a small Cambridge, Mass., start-up, took a step along the long road to the e-book. It unveiled a sample...
Periscope
EXCLUSIVE Los Alamos Flunks a Security Test Just as the FBI seemed to be clearing up loose ends in its investigation of fired Los Alamos nuclear scientist Wen Ho Lee, NEWSWEEK has learned of other security worries at the atomic-research facility. Sources...
Perspectives
"One day you're up, one day you're down." James Baker, George W. Bush's point man in Florida, on the unexpected twists and turns in the post-election mayhem "Count first, and rule upon legality afterwards, is not a recipe for producing election...
Pieces of the Puzzle: A Break in the Case-But There's Not Enough Evidence Yet to Link the Cole Attack Directly to Osama Bin Laden
When a pair of suicide bombers attacked the USS Cole on Oct. 12, they might have hoped to obliterate any evidence of their plot along with themselves. They didn't succeed. Yemen's security forces didn't do much of a job of protecting the Cole, but...
Plenty Wrong with WAP: Wireless Application Protocol Was Supposed to Bring the Web to Your Mobile Phone. but Think Twice before Buying into This Troubled Technology
Try this experiment: pick up your newspaper and find the weather forecast for your area. Note how long it took you. Look up the listings for the movie theater closest to you. Find a sports score. In each case, record the elapsed time. Now try the same...
Red Seas: Intriguing New Photos of Mars Show Evidence of Shallow Oceans That Might Once Have Supported Primitive Life
Michael Malin's quest began almost 30 years ago, when the spacecraft Mariner 9 snapped a few pictures of Mars's surface. The probe sent back photos of volcanoes, flood channels and craters--and some intriguing shots of mounds of layered rock in huge...
Settling Old Scores in the Swamp: Grudge Match: All the High-Octane Lawyers Who Swooped into Tallahassee Were Only Minor Players on a Stage of Ancient Feuds and Local Vendettas
It was a declaration that the man from the Bush-Cheney campaign might, at a calmer moment, like to take back, or perhaps phrase more delicately. But chaos and confusion can make petty despots of us all, and to any Bush supporter the scene in the Leon...
Show Me the Most Money: A-Rod's Agent Guns for Baseball's Richest Deal
Scott Boras is used to having things his way. While most dads are happy to toss the ball around with their kids in the backyard, that clearly wasn't good enough for the most aggressive agent in baseball. Not satisfied with the local Little League field...
Slavery's New Face: It May Not Look like 'Roots.' but Thousands Share the Defining Traits of Slaves through the Ages: They Are Not Paid, and They Cannot Leave
Christi Elangwe must have dazzled the human-resources department at Kmart with her brilliant smile and invincible humor--they hired her on the spot, and she started work just before Thanksgiving. "I'm the greeter," the 23-year-old says enthusiastically...
'The Bernice Test': So-Called Internet Appliances Promise an Easy Way onto the Internet. Each Has Its Good Points, but Are They Something Grandma Will Want?
For the past few years, I've been computer shopping for the toughest customer around--my grandmother. It's no easy task. PCs are far too complex, and don't handle well the seasonal voyage from the Northeast to Florida. WebTV was a bust: my grandmom...
The Cool Cajun to See: Taking the Hill: If Anybody Can Make Peace, It May Be John Breaux
You never know where a conversation with John Breaux is going next. One minute he's discussing George W. Bush, and then he remembers that when Bush recently called his mobile phone, Breaux was unloading garbage at a dump in suburban Washington. "I've...
The Market's Crystal Ball Is Cloudy: Stock Prices Don't Necessarily Predict Where the Economy's Going. So If You Want Something to Worry about, Try the Debt Market
If you're feeling unsettled about the state of your life and your portfolio, don't worry. You're not alone. This is, after all, an unsettling season. Year-end holidays are looming, and you're supposed to be jolly. But for many of us the holidays are...
The Snippy Supremes: High Stakes: The Justices Risk Seeming as Divided as the Rest of Us
Things are getting ugly at the U.S. Supreme Court. In the weeks since the election, the justices have tried to conceal their internal differences about how to resolve the political brawl in Florida--speaking, at least publicly, with one voice. But...
Twice as Sweet as Sugar: A Small French Town Is Put in a Spin over Chocolate
Once upon a time, in 1959, in the pious, picturesque and puritanical French town of Lansquenet, a mysterious woman and her daughter, cloaked in red, blew into town on the wake of a north wind. The woman, Vianne (Juliette Binoche), opens a chocolaterie,...
'We Are Still Searching': Exclusive: The President of Yemen on the Hunt for the Cole Bombers-And the Deadly Legacy of the 'Arab-Afghans.'
Yemen's president Ali Abdullah Saleh is, after Libya's Muammar Kaddafi, the longest-ruling leader in the Arab world. Saleh's efforts to improve relations with the United States were sorely tested by the suicide bombing of the USS Cole during a refueling...
What's a Shopper to Do? Our Restaurant Tabs and Spending Sprees Have Fueled the Boom. but Some of Us Are Already Beginning to Cut Back
When it comes to the slowing economy, Ellen Spero isn't biting her nails just yet. But the 47-year-old manicurist isn't buffing, filing or polishing as many nails as she'd like to, either. Most of her clients spend $12 to $50 weekly, but last month...