Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 11

A 20-Year Toll: The Sound of an Epidemic, from the Early Days, When We Didn't Know What to Call It, to the Present, When We Still Can't Figure out How to Cure It
June 1981 Dr. Michael Gottlieb writes the first article: We'd been seeing patients with fevers and weight loss, and by the spring they'd developed an unusual pneumonia. All were homosexual. A colleague and I wrote an article. Then other doctors...
A Bloodbath in the Palace: Nepal's Troubled Crown Prince Kills Most of His Family
On Friday evenings the Nepalese royal family customarily gathered in a private room at the Royal Palace to dine together. Over meals of rice, lentils, wild boar and Nepalese curry, they'd discuss matters of concern to the monarchy. The main topic last...
A Giant Find in the Oasis: A Little Mistake Can Lead to a Big Discovery
The gods of paleontology were smiling down on Joshua Smith that day in 1999 when he entered the wrong coordinates into his Global Positioning System receiver. A graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania, Smith had decided over beers with friends...
AIDS at 20: The Plague That's Killed 22 Million Isn't Done with Us Yet. While We Hunt for a Vaccine, People Continue to Die-From AIDS or the Drugs Intended to Treat It
405,584 The number of all blacks and Hispanics in the United States infected with HIV in 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. In 1985 that number was 3,078. On June 5, 1981, the federal Centers for Disease Control issued...
A Postbubble Start-Up: Wireless Devices: At Danger, the Dreams Are Just as Big, but the Business Plan Is Cautious and Conservative
Like the Yeti, the Loch Ness monster and UFOs over the Nevada desert, a single gadget that does everything--gets e-mail, surfs the Web, makes phone calls--has long been the subject of wonderment, always there but just out of sight. In the foothills...
Busted Again in Margaritaville: The President's Twins Discover That Drinking and the Limelight Don't Mix
About half of college freshmen admit to drinking beer, down from about 75 percent two decades ago, according to a study by the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA. At the University of Texas, ranked No. 2 in the nation for "lots of beer" by...
Can He Find A Cure? A Vaccine Is Our Last, Best Hope of Stopping the Epidemic. Seth Berkley Is Trying to Deliver the Dream
$232,000,000 The number of dollars the National Institutes of Health spent on research for an AIDS vaccine, up from $82 million in 1993. In 2000, the NIH spent $570 million on new drug therapies, up from $430 million in 1993. There was a time...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Your Vacation Is Just a Click Away SURF REPORT JENNIFER TANAKA AND MICHAEL E. RYAN The Internet has become a traveler's best friend. Book flights, research destinations and, most of all, find bargains. If you're planning a summer...
Help in the E.R
Should families have easier access to patients during emergencies? A growing number of researchers say it's good medicine. "Family members can comfort patients in a way no health-care provider can, and when the patient is less scared, procedures run...
How to Ace College: In a New Book, a Harvard Professor Reveals Secrets from His 10-Year Study of Successful Students
There's so much focus on how to get into college these days, and not much advice about what to do once you get there. Back in the 1980s, the then Harvard president Derek Bok asked Richard J. Light, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education,...
Is McCain off the Range? the Cheerful Maverick Flirts with Bolting the GOP
At lunch in Phoenix late last week, John McCain eagerly retold his favorite episode of "The Sopranos." Tony's guys botch the whacking of a mobster, a former Army commando who turns on them in snowy woods. "I'm Russian!" the character sneers. "I wash...
Lucinda Straight Up: Honky-Tonk Heartbreaker Lucinda Williams Discovers That Less Is More When It Comes to Ripping Us Apart
It bothers me that people think I'm so difficult," says Lucinda Williams, the singer-songwriter revered for her Marlboro-stained voice, vivid storytelling and stubborn unwillingness to just take things as they come. She refuses to fit in, instead carving...
MAIL CALL: Crime and Punishment
Responding to our cover story on Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh and the roots of evil, some readers said the convicted man should be put to death. "Die he certainly must," declared one, "if there is to be closure in this chapter of our history."...
My 60-Second Protest from the Hallway: I Walk out during My School's Minute of Silence to Show Other Kids There's an Alternative to Complacency
It's 8:32 a.m. school began two minutes ago. My bulging book bag is inside my first-period classroom saving my favorite seat. I am standing in the near-empty hallway, leaning against a locker right outside the classroom. I should be in class, yet my...
Newsmakers; Martin Rides to Victory: This Week: Casey Martin, Ellen Degeneres, Pamela Anderson Lee, and Ali vs. Frazier in the Ring Again
Martin Rides to Victory Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer are golfing legends, but they just got beaten by a guy who's ranked 115th on the Buy.com Tour. Last week the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that, under the Americans With Disabilities Act, disabled...
'Our House Is on Fire': The Number of Blacks with HIV Is Soaring. Phill Wilson Is Taking His Rage to His People-And Hoping They'll Wake Up
74,434 The number, in 1999, of all black men in the U.S. who have sex with men and are infected with HIV. In 1989, that number was 11,501. By 1999, the number of Hispanic men who have sex with men and are infected was 45,867; it was 7,386 in 1989....
Periscope
EXCLUSIVE The Reviewer Who Wasn't There David Manning of The Ridgefield Press is one of Columbia Pictures' most reliable reviewers, praising Heath Ledger of "A Knight's Tale" as "this year's hottest new star!" and saluting "The Animal" as "another...
Perspectives
"He is getting back some of his own." Former First Lady Barbara Bush, on her son George W. Bush--who had his own problems with drinking--facing those same issues with his twin daughters "The FBI proved his case for him--that the system is hopelessly...
Sold! Can a Hot Housing Market Save the Economy from the Deep Freeze?
Carl Statham isn't sticking to the script. In a sputtering economy, consumers are supposed to rein in their spending, particularly on big-ticket items. Yet even with the faltering stock market and headlines about mass layoffs, Statham and his wife,...
Surviving Sleepovers: There's Still Magic in Midnight Madness, but Parents Also Worry about Guns, Drugs and Too Much Violence on the Hosts' VCR
A few weeks ago Charlotte, Phoebe and James Huth--who give their ages as 4 3/4, 7 3/4 and 10 3/4, respectively--were model hosts of a sleepover. Four friends arrived at their Newton, Mass., home at 4 p.m. and quickly proceeded to swing, dress up, gobble...
Tax Cuts: Who Will Get What: Yes, Indeed-The Rich Do Well, While Those in Low Brackets Are Left with the Scraps
It was like watching a fatal accident in slow motion. For a few moments everyone was alive, and then--kaboom. In the same way, for just a few moments we had breathing room to provide for Social Security, Medicare and other unmet needs. Now, after 15...
The Angry Prophet Is Dying: Controversial Author Larry Kramer Is a One-Man History of the AIDS Struggle, from Early Activism to the Fading Hope of Medical Salvation
Larry Kramer is dying. Not wilting pitifully onto a milk-covered floor, like the doomed character in Kramer's devastating AIDS play "The Normal Heart." Not grandly bidding farewell to "all this beauty," as a character did in his outrageous novel "Faggots."...
Wanted: A Switch of Pitch: Television: Personal Video Recorders Were Overpriced and Undermarketed. New Ad Campaigns May Make Consumers Pay Attention
It was early in the game's second half when Mike Lang, hosting a Super Bowl party in football-crazed South Bend, Ind., experienced a problem on the sidelines. Lang's 2-year-old son, up after hours, was throwing a tantrum. This was a job for TiVo. With...
'We Have Been Here Before': Similarities between Irish, Italians and Jews Then, and Blacks, Latinos and Asians Now
Columbus, an Italian, arrived in the new World with a crew of less than 100 composed of Spaniards, Portuguese, some Jews who had been expelled from Spain, some convicts and an Arab brought along to translate anticipated conversations with Chinese and...
'We've Been Kidnapped': As Tensions in the Mideast Reach a New Height, Fueled by Suicide Attacks and Guerrilla War, a NEWSWEEK Team Gets Caught in the Chaos. A Reporter's Story-And What's Next for the Region
It began in a concrete-block house in a sandy alley in Rafah, a hardscrabble Palestinian town at the southern edge of the Gaza Strip. Photographer Gary Knight and I had driven there last Tuesday morning to report on a worsening guerrilla war--a conflict...