Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 29

A Meeting of the Minds: John Paul II Calls the U.S. Cardinals to Rome. Let the Damage Control Begin
Byline: Kenneth L. Woodward His office said he was in seclusion, spending his time in prayer. But somehow Boston's embattled cardinal, Bernard Law, managed to slip past the American paparazzi stationed outside his mansion, board a plane unnoticed...
A New Breed of War Widow: Shannon Spann Is No Ordinary Bereaved Wife. She's a Spy
Byline: Kevin Peraino Shannon Spann bounces her baby on a knee, coaxing a smile from the otherwise stolid 10-month-old. "I'm a pretty special boy," she coos, as Jake gnaws on a plastic Elmo doll. A portrait of Jake's dad, CIA agent Johnny (Mike)...
A Street Fight: The CIA Was in Serious Trouble. Then Came September 11. How It's Getting in the Game-In Afghanistan and Beyond
Byline: Evan Thomas Parachuting supplies to CIA operatives working behind enemy lines is a tricky business, even in an age of Global Positioning Systems and spy-in-the-sky satellites. Supplies meant for the Alpha or Bravo team sometimes land on...
Colin Powell's Humiliation: Bush Should Clearly Support His Secretary of State-Otherwise He Should Get a New One
Byline: Fareed Zakaria When George W. Bush was assembling his "dream team" of foreign-policy advisers, many wondered who would resolve the inevitable clashes between the Olympians. Not to worry, we were told. Once the president made a decision,...
From Coffee Cup to Court: The Greatest Advance in Evidentiary History Is at Our Fingertips. or Buried in Storage Somewhere
Byline: Anna Quindlen Here is a story that tells you why DNA evidence is the greatest advance in crime and punishment since the invention of the jury: A teenage girl is raped in Harlem, and the police know they've got their guy. He'd just been released...
How Great Companies Tame Technology: They Begin with a Disciplined Business Plan. and Then They Bring in High Tech to Make It Better
Byline: Jim Collins In 1997, I conducted a research interview with Ken Iverson, the CEO who led Nucor from obscurity into becoming the most profitable steel company in America. I particularly looked forward to our conversation, as the transformative...
I'll Help Myself: Companies Are Always Looking Just over the Horizon for the Next Great Innovation. but Often the Best Ideas Come from a Smart New Spin on Devices That Are Right under Our Noses-Like Checkout Scanners and Magnetic-Card Readers-That Can Change Many Routines of Life. Think of It as the Lagging Edge of Technology
Byline: Daniel McGinn It's fun to gee-whiz over new technology, to "Wow!" at the latest gizmos and to dream of devices that never were and ask, "Why not?" Our affection for futurist gear fuels our love of science fiction (think we'll ever have a...
Keep Investing in a Downturn: Jim Morgan of Applied Materials Watches for Opportunities in Manufacturing
Applied Materials might just be the most important manufacturer you've never heard of. Sitting squarely at the crossroads of the New and Old Economies, it builds huge machines that make tiny computer chips for companies like IBM, Intel and Sony. And...
Mail Call and Corrections: Readers Respond to Our April 15th Issue, "How Two Lives Met in Death," Plus Free-Spirited Kids and Taking Our Daughters to Work
MAIL CALL The Legacy of Hatred Many readers we heard from were deeply moved by our April 15 cover story. One thanked us for "the excellent writing, the emotional angles and the poignant photography." Said another: "Reading this extremely informative...
Newsmakers
Byline: David Gates and Marc Peyser This Ain't No Cop Show About the only person surprised by Robert Blake's arrest last week for the murder of his wife, nearly a year ago, was the actor himself, who was in his underwear when the LAPD barged...
Periscope
Byline: Dan Ephron; Michael Isikoff and Joseph Contreras; Mark Hosenball; David A. Kaplan; Bret Begun; Karen Springen; Peg Tyre; Julie Scelfo; Lorraine Ali; Malcolm Jones MIDDLE EAST Palestinian Security Structures in Rubble Israel's war on the...
Perspectives
"How this can happen is a mystery to us." Canadian Defense chief Ray Henault, on the U.S. fighter jet that accidentally bombed Canadian forces in Afghanistan, killing four soldiers "We personally thought Asians would love this T shirt." Abercrombie...
Reconsidering HRT: Is Estrogen the Answer to Menopause? A New Report Suggests That Many Users Could Opt for Alternatives
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley and Karen Springen A few weeks from now, doctors, patients and pharmaceutical executives will gather in L.A. to throw a birthday party for Premarin, the estrogen pill that made "hormone-replacement therapy" a rite of passage...
Special Report: Business and Technology
Byline: Bret Begun; Joan Raymond; Suzanne Smalley; Linda Stern; Patrick Crowley; John Horn; Tanya Irwin; Karen Springen Glitzy tech firms in Silicon Valley tend to get all the attention. But away from that spotlight, all sorts of companies--from...
Television: Prairie Home Companions: Hissy Fits and History Class on 'Frontier House'
Byline: Marc Peyser It takes less than 40 minutes for the first person to start crying on "Frontier House." That's not so bad, given that "Frontier" is one of those semisadistic PBS shows where mild-mannered history buffs travel back in time to...
The Empire Bounces Back: 'The Phantom Menace' Was a Smash-And a Mediocre Buzz Kill. for 'Attack of the Clones,' a Wiser George Lucas Has Been Wooing Back Fans and Building a Better Blockbuster
Byline: With John Horn You want a free tie? Here, take one. Take three! Just be forewarned: They've got Yoda on them. And Jar Jar Binks. And Anakin Skywalker, the cheeky little punk from "The Phantom Menace"--the one you probably wanted to muffle,...
'There Will Be Guidance': Bishop Wilton Gregory on the Vatican Summit, Sex Abuse and Keeping Kids Safe
Byline: David France When the pope and American cardinals convene this week to discuss the expanding abuse-and-cover-up crisis, it will be a vindication of sorts for Bishop Wilton Gregory. As president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops,...
The Right Way to Read: In the Old Days, Preschoolers Had No More Pressing Business Than to Learn How to Play. New Research Shows That They Benefit from Instruction in Words and Sounds
Publisher clarification: May 23, 2002 The "The Right Way to Read" (SOCIETY,April 29), we inadvertently misstated the name of the Roseville Community Preschool. ___________________________________________ Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Pat Wingert...
'The Single Most Important Company': Lenny Mendonca of McKinsey Global Institute Says Productivity Gains Will Help Lift the Economy
Economists love a good debate. And as the recession eases, they're studying why the economy grew so quickly during the '90s boom--and whether those halcyon days will return. Lenny Mendonca, chairman of McKinsey Global Institute and a consultant for...
Under Siege in Bethlehem: On a Holy Site, Hunger, Gangrene, Snipers, Fires and Disputes over the Dead. A Report from Jesus' Birthplace
Byline: Joshua Hammer On Wednesday morning, April 17--his 15th day under siege--Muhammad Madani woke up in an airless cell in Bethlehem's St. Catherine's Church and braced himself for another day of misery. Madani's head throbbed and his gut ached...
'We're under Attack': Online Forum: We Asked Nine Experts to Talk to Readers about the Workplace of the Future. the Bottom Line: There's a Lot of Anxiety out There. but Is That a Bad Thing?
For NEWSWEEK's Online Forum on the Future of Work, a panel of experts from business, government and academia joined in a four-day discussion with readers about technology, management and up-and-coming careers. More than 23,000 people from around the...
When Your Folks Are the Folks Next Door: Most People Stay in Touch with Their Family by E-Mail or Phone, but I Just Wave from the Kitchen Window
Byline: Karen McQuestion Occasionally I say something that's guaranteed to evoke a strong response. I tell people, "I live next door to my parents." Their reaction tells me a lot about the relationship they have with their own parents. I've heard...