Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 29

And Now, Global Booby Prizes: Unilateralism Has Produced a Multilateral Free-for-All, a Chaotic Jockeying for Power over Which Washington Is Losing Control
Byline: Fareed Zakaria If there were a booby prize for statesmanship, this year's would go to Inacio Lula da Silva of Brazil, whose government, more than any other, was responsible for wrecking the Cancun trade talks. There's lots of blame to go...
An Entrepreneur Steps to the Plate: Baseball Statistics Are as Parochial as They're Sacred. Can an AI Software Expert Change the Business?
Byline: Alan Schwarz Three years ago, Ron Antinoja was driving to work outside San Francisco when his mind wandered back to childhood. He'd been a marine biologist in his 20s, then a developer of artificial-intelligence software in his 30s and 40s,...
An IPO Rebound: After a Long Slump, Firms with Solid Track Records Are Finding Buyers for Their Stock
Byline: Brad Stone From April 2000 until very recently, a magnum of Perrier Jouet champagne sat in Patrick Lo's desk, awaiting the day that his Silicon Valley company, Netgear, would go public. He bought the bubbly when the firm, which makes PC-networking...
Chrysler Shifts Gears: It's Been Overtaken by Toyota, It's Losing a Price War to GM and Its New Model Is Sputtering. but Detroit's Perennial Also-Ran Has a Bold New Plan: Be like Benz
Byline: Keith Naughton Pity the poor Chrysler execs at the Frankfurt Motor Show this month. They traveled to Germany to show off their steroidal new 300C Hemi luxury sedan and wagon. But the press wanted to talk only about Chrysler's fall from the...
Clark's Charge: The Race: The General Did What He Always Does-Shot to the Top of His Class. but His Skin Is Thin, and the Climb Is Steep. What Wesley Clark's Arrival Does to the Democratic Field
Byline: Howard Fineman After al Qaeda attacked America, retired Gen. Wes Clark thought the Bush administration would invite him to join its team. After all, he'd been NATO commander, he knew how to build military coalitions and the investment firm...
Dark Days in Bethlehem: Under Siege from All Sides, Christians in the Holy Land Have Never Been So Beset. A Report from the Front
Byline: Joshua Hammer David Mansour's ties to the Holy Land have all but unraveled. A Greek Orthodox Christian whose family has lived in Bethlehem for generations, Mansour runs the Christmas Tree Souvenir Shop on Milk Grotto Street, just around...
Fast Chat: Ooh, Man, That's Gonna Leave a Mark
Byline: T. Trent Gegax Some experiences--being shot in the head, undergoing an exorcism--are better to read about than live through. Others--winning the lottery, being in an orgy--would make for a great day. In "What It Feels Like," mostly new takes...
'Going Back to Hell': It Was a Hard Book to Write, and Also Painful to Finish
Byline: Mark Miller Since the murder of her husband, Mariane Pearl has moved to Manhattan, where she lives with her son, Adam, now 16 months old. NEWSWEEK's Mark Miller spoke to her there last week about her memories of Danny, her hopes for Adam...
Here's the Real Grasso Scandal: It's like Calvinball from the 'Calvin & Hobbes' Comic Strip: You Make Up Your Own Rules. Corporate America's Still Playing That Game
Byline: Allan Sloan Until recently, Dick Grasso was a symbol of capitalist success. He'd started as a listings clerk at the New York Stock Exchange in 1968 and 30 years later had climbed to the top of the organization, despite his working-class...
High on Testosterone: As the NIH Ponders the Risks and Benefits of This Drug, Millions Are Taking It-And Prescriptions Are Soaring
Byline: David Noonan Things weren't going well for Tristan Logan last winter, physically or mentally. The 55-year-old, an avid weight lifter with a black belt in tae kwon do, was tired and weak. The amount of iron he was able to pump during workouts...
Is That a Radio in Your Cereal? Retailers Plan to Use Tiny Transmitters to Record Your Purchases. What Else Will They Find Out?
Byline: Brad Stone You can't buy a can of soup or a box of detergent today without also acquiring one of those ubiquitous pieces of black and white stripes: the bar code. Yet the introduction of the bar code, more than 30 years ago, wasn't exactly...
Is Wi-Fi Just a Bubble? Hot Spots Were Hyped as the Next Big Thing. They're Not There Yet
Byline: Karen Lowry Miller In the edgy world of high tech, hot spots sounded so good they just had to work. A customer would pop into a cafe, flip open a laptop and cheerfully surf the Net, download music or check e-mail. No more wires, no more...
Jumpin' Jack Black: He's a Gas, Gas, Gas. in 'School of Rock,' Jack Black Doesn't Just Steal the Show-He Is the Show
Byline: Devin Gordon Hey, Jack. Jack!" A woman with a baby stroller is trying to get Jack Black's attention as he waits in line at a midtown Manhattan burger joint. "I've got a blast from the past for you," she says as he wheels around. "OK," he...
Love Doesn't Stink. but 'Coupling' Sure Does. We're with 'I'm with Her.'
Byline: Marc Peyser Television, like Jennifer Lopez, is unlucky in love. Sure, TV has enjoyed plenty of quickie romances, if you believe there's much true romance on "The Bachelor," "Joe Millionaire" and their evil spawn. But when it comes to network...
Money: Doughnuts to Dollars
Byline: Linda Stern Toasters are back. So are lawn chairs, coffee bars, vacuum cleaners and free ATMs. Retail bankers are having a good old-fashioned brawl, doling out dollars and doughnuts (Krispy Kremes) for your deposits. Several years of weak...
Mr. Coffee-Not: Dunkin's Ultimate Weapon: A High-Tech, Idiotproof Espresso Machine for Every Store. Price Tag: Just under $12,000
Byline: Daniel McGinn Seb Agapite doesn't fancy himself a barista, nor is he looking to hire one. But inside Dunkin' Donuts' product-development center in Braintree, Mass., Agapite stands before a high-tech machine that will let his stores sell...
Newsmakers
Byline: Sean Smith, B. J. Sigesmund Living a Real-Life Fantasy If your kid won't do his homework, this'll really depress you. A Montana teen has not only written a 528-page fantasy novel, but the book, "Eragon," has debuted at No. 3 on The New...
No More Teachers, No More Books: Morris Brown College Is Struggling for Survival
Byline: Allison Samuels Yes, we're open," the phone message at Morris Brown College greets callers. You'd barely know it, walking around the Atlanta campus of this 122-year-old institution. The gym is dark. The fraternities have all disbanded. The...
Oh, Sweet Revenge: Dunkin' Donuts Faces Two High-End Rivals: Krispy Kreme and Starbucks. It's Doing Just Fine. A Case Study
Byline: Daniel McGinn It's just after 4 on an early summer morning, and two uniformed men work the counter at Dunkin' Donuts in Framingham, Mass. As they serve takeout coffee to early risers, the workers seem blithely ignorant of the enemy that's...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: The Washington Post, San Francisco Chronicle, Sports Illustrated, Associated Press, Home News Tribune, Reuters (2), Associated Press, KFOR, abcnews.Com, Associated Press, Sky News "Honey, I think I just...
Politics: The Water Walker: The Man: He Is an Elite Soldier-Scholar Who's Made as Many Enemies as He's Defeated in Battle. Can He Lead a Country? the Real Wes Clark
CORRECTION PUBLISHED 9/30/03: Due to a design error, we did not name the source for the Sept. 29 graphic "Early Bird Gets the Win" in the article "The Water Walker." The source was "In Pursuit of the White House 2000: How We Choose Our Presidential...
Red Herring Redux: There's a New Biotech Magazine. It's from Media Vets of the High-Flying Dot-Com Era
Byline: Michael Rogers It's a matter of faith in some circles that biotechnology is the next high-tech revolution: it will change the world, spawn new industries and create megamillionaires. It will likely do all those--but probably far more slowly...
Review: 'A' Is for Awesome
Byline: David Ansen Let's come right out and say it: "School of Rock" made me laugh harder than any movie I've seen this year. The giggles start coming right at the get-go, when Jack Black, as the fiercely committed but less than inspired rock-and-roller...
Riffing on the Blues: America's Rootsiest Music through Filmmakers' Eyes
Byline: Malcolm Jones One night in 1903, W. C. Handy was standing on a railroad platform in Tutwiler, Miss., waiting for a train, when he heard a man playing a guitar using a knife for a slide on the strings. Handy, who would later write "St. Louis...
Small-Screen Dilemma: It's the Newest Tech Etiquette Problem: Should You Let the Caller Know You Know Who's Calling?
Byline: Daniel McGinn It's becoming the new century's big etiquette dilemma: your phone rings, and the caller ID says it's your friend Bob. Do you answer "Hi, Bob," a high-efficiency greeting that eliminates the formality and time of Bob's identifying...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker A tale of two Wesley Clarks: Two weeks ago, as the general was nearing his decision to enter the presidential race, I was invited to a get-to-know-you reception in his honor at the home of a well-known New York publisher. I...
The European Project Sags: Many Would-Be Architects of a United Europe Are Making a Mistake They Repeatedly Accused the United States of Making
Byline: George F. Will From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, Europe is seething with resentment about one nation's hubris. The Continent reverberates with angry denunciations of that renegade nation's lawless unilateralism. No,...
'The Matter of Arafat': Israel and the U.S. Can 'Agree to Disagree' on Expelling Him
Byline: Dan Ephron Israel's Foreign Minister, Silvan Shalom, had a tough few days last week. As the country's highest-ranking diplomat, Shalom had to explain to the international community why the Israeli cabinet decided in principle to remove Palestinian...
The Oracle Speaks: Between Yacht Races and Earnings Reports, Larry Ellison Ponders Software and Life
Byline: Steven Levy Larry Ellison has never been shy of publicity. The richest man in Silicon Valley and the relentlessly aggressive founder of the relentlessly aggressive Oracle software company has cultivated an image as a computer-industry leader...
The Shame of Mutual Funds: While Most of Them Are Probably Clean, Dozens of Others Earn Big Bucks through Tricks That Siphon Profits Away from Trusting Small Investors
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn As an industry, mutual funds have never been as squeaky clean as investors thought. Some exaggerate their performance in ads. Some create phony "hot funds" that haul in dollars and then bomb out. Fees have risen when they...
The Spouse: The General's Own MP: Street-Smart and Skilled in the Politics of the Military, Gert Clark Embarks on a Journey She Reluctantly Agreed to Make
Byline: Martha Brant Gertrude Clark has stuck with her husband through trying times: Vietnam, the South American drug war, genocide in the Balkans. She moved more than 30 times in 36 years to accommodate Wesley Clark's rising military career. So...
The War of the Super-Handhelds: Nintendo's Portable Game Boy Has Long Had the Ring to Itself. That's about to Change
Byline: N'Gai Croal If there's one company whose name is synonymous with videogames, it's Nintendo. That's because, even as the company's share of the U.S. home-console market fell from 90 percent to 15 percent over the past decade, its Pokemon-fueled...
The White House: Why Do We Think Saddam's Connected to 9/11?
Byline: Mark Hosenball According to the polls, more than two thirds of the American public believes that Saddam Hussein was behind the 9/11 attacks. Last week on "Meet the Press," Vice President Dick Cheney lent weight to the alleged connection...
This Guy's Gone Wild: His Racy Flicks Earned Him a Mint-And a World of Legal Woe
Byline: Suzanne Smalley Joe Francis is a tough guy to avoid. Flick on late-night TV and you'll be bombarded with the not-so-subtle ads for his Girls Gone Wild videotapes, which feature cheesy, low-budget footage of tipsy coeds flashing for the camera....
We Must Fight Fire with Fire-Literally: Our Overcrowded Forests Have Become Powder Kegs, Primed to Explode. We Need to Take Action
Byline: Samuel Sheridan This summer marked my second season as a wildland firefighter, and my first as a Hotshot, a member of a 20-person crew flown in to fight especially difficult fires anywhere in the United States. So I'm a relatively inexperienced...
We're Here! We Cheer! Get Used to It! Waving Pompoms and Wearing Kilts, These Young Men and Women Root for Political Causes, Not Sports Teams
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz At first, the cheerleaders getting ready for practice in a Los Angeles park seem like average teens as they sip Coke and pepper their sentences with "like." But then 17-year-old Larry Wood peels off his sweat pants to...
Why Money Won't Matter: Fund-Raising at This Stage Is a Fancy Poll. You Can Have Half as Much Cash as the Next Guy and Still Win. the Issue: Clark's Political Skills
Byline: Jonathan Alter If Wes Clark goes nowhere, you can already hear the tired punditry: He didn't have enough cash. He started too late. Blah, blah, blah. This analysis has already begun, though it is close to meaningless. Let's start with the...