Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 1

Couples: State of Our Unions; If Marriage Is in Trouble, Don't Blame Gays. Straights Changed the Rules
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz, With Pat Wingert, Karen Springen, Julie Scelfo, Joan Raymond and bureau reports Amber Settle, a 35-year-old associate professor of computer science at DePaul University in Chicago, is eight months pregnant and unmarried....
Design: A Garden of One's Own
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan Michael Arad almost didn't win the competition to design the World Trade Center memorial. His original design, featuring deep pools in the footprints of the Twin Towers, was austere; the jury insisted he collaborate with...
Editor on the Attack; A Top Woman Journalist Strafes Her Colleagues
Byline: Peg Tyre Sometime between editing features on Jell-O molds, tummy taming and "Can This Marriage Be Saved?" longtime Ladies' Home Journal editor Myrna Blyth learned how to lob hand grenades. Two years after retiring, Blyth, 64, has written...
Fast Chat: Baby, You're a Rich Man
Byline: Marc Peyser What do Broadway's most beloved milkman and "Spider-Man's" next villain have in common? They're both played by Alfred Molina. He talked to Marc Peyser about Tevye, Dr. Octopus and the people who sing along with "Fiddler on the...
Help Not Wanted; Jobs: Where Did They Go? Offshoring's a Problem, but There's a Bigger Culprit
Byline: Daniel McGinn, With Jason McLure, Barney Gimbel and Joan Raymond It's a set of questions that would make any cubicle dweller a bit nervous. "Exactly how do you do your job? Would you mind writing it down?" When Hank Williamson, a tech administrator...
In Iraq, It's Time for Some Smarts; the Lesson Here Is Not That the U.N. Is Always Right or Competent. It Isn't. the Lesson Is That America Needs to Exercise Power Shrewdly
Byline: Fareed Zakaria, Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com. As the war in Iraq was coming to a close, many people--from Tony Blair to Joseph Biden (and even this writer)--urged Washington to give the United Nations a central role in...
'I Talk about Things People Care about'; Vox Pop: John Edwards Speaks Out-On Trade Policy, His Electoral Strategy and His Take on President Bush
Byline: Jonathan Alter and Arian Campo-Flores He's notoriously on-message, and relentlessly upbeat. But Sen. John Edwards is beginning to go beyond the well-worn grooves of his successful stump speech and air his plans to defeat John Kerry for the...
Kids Will Be. Daytraders? Internet Games Are a Fun Way to Get Students Interested in Stocks. but Then What? Let's Teach Them Diversification, Not the Art of Short Selling
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn, Reporting Associate: Temma Ehrenfeld Who are those kids hanging out by the school computers and shouting, "Buy Cisco, sell Intel"? They might be yours, using play money to bet on stock prices in class. During the stock-market...
Mail Call: A Firestorm over 'The Passion'; More Than 900 Readers Debate Jesus Christ's Last Hours and Mel Gibson's New Film
Our Feb. 16 cover story on the crucifixion of Jesus, and the controversy surrounding Mel Gibson's movie "The Passion of the Christ," drew hundreds of responses. Many thanked us for tackling the subject. "I haven't read such an unbiased and scholarly...
Mail Call: Run, Dean, Run?
Most readers responding to our Jan. 12 cover story on Howard Dean's presidential run supported his candidacy. Said one, he brings "a breath of clean Vermont air to a stale Democratic Party." Another insisted "he must be taken seriously." Many faulted...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Devin Gordon KEISHA CASTLE-HUGHES At 13, New Zealand's Keisha Castle-Hughes is the youngest actress ever nominated for a best-actress Oscar, for her role as Pai, the spirited Maori girl in "Whale Rider." She spoke with a...
Outlaw Vows; A Brash Young Mayor Issues Marriage Licenses to Same-Sex Couples and Opens a New Front in America's Culture Wars
Byline: Karen Breslau and Brad Stone, With Debra Rosenberg and Tamara Lipper Moved by news footage of thousands of same-sex couples waiting patiently in the rain for hours for the chance to get a marriage license, Mike Trevinson boarded a plane...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation Sources From Top To Bottom, Left To Right: Associated Press, New York Times, Associated Press, Fox News, San Francisco Chronicle, New York Daily News, Union Of Concerned Scientists, New York Post, Details, BBC News "It's all--maybe...
Reality Check: 'Can I Have a Few Weeks off?'; the Lure of Shows like 'Apprentice' Is a Headache for Bosses
Byline: Daniel McGinn with Keith Naughton For "The Apprentice" contestants, high drama usually happens in Donald Trump's boardroom. But reality shows can create different conflicts: the kind that erupt when an employee tells the boss she wants weeks...
Rogue Nukes: A Swiss Connection to a Pakistani Bomb Racket?
Byline: Mark Hosenball Did Abdul Qadeer Khan, the notorious Pakistani nuclear proliferator, get help from a prominent Swiss family? Investigators have been unraveling the maze of connections that allowed Khan to supply the budding nuclear-weapons...
Shiites Unbound; George H.W. Bush Feared the Rise of Shiite Power in Iraq, and Worried That Civil War Would Shatter the Country. That's Why He Didn't Topple Saddam. So What Has Changed?
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Rod Nordland, With Tamara Lipper in Washington and Babak Dehghanpisheh in Tehran Saddam Hussein had something against bananas and taxed them heavily. You rarely ever saw them for sale when he was in power. Now they're...
Smiles to Go; Power Drive: Edwards Looms in the Rearview Mirror. but Kerry's Got His Foot on the Gas, and the Bushmobile's Wobbly. Revving Up for Super Tuesday
Byline: Howard Fineman and Tamara Lipper, With Richard Wolffe and Arian Campo-Flores John Kerry assumed that the book party was his to work, and his alone. After all, he was Massachusetts's junior senator, and the host was Ted Kennedy, senior senator....
So What's the Good News? the Debate over 'The Passion' May Be Less Harsh Than the Film
Byline: David Ansen I have no doubt that Mel Gibson loves Jesus. From the evidence of "The Passion of the Christ," however, what he seems to love as much is the cinematic depiction of flayed, severed, swollen, scarred flesh and rivulets of spilled...
Start Your Steamrollers; the Senate Passed Its Highway Bill as a Presidential Aide Was Being Pelted with Dead Cats for the Sin of Truthfulness
Byline: George F. Will Genuine alarm was excited throughout the country by what was for the first time widely recognized as a German menace. In the end a curious and characteristic compromise was reached. The Admiralty had demanded six ships: the...
The Donald and the Democrats; to Win over 'The Apprentice' Audience, the Dems Are out to Invent Something New in American Political History-A Friendly, Patriotic, Positive Populism
Byline: Jonathan Alter Twenty years ago Donald Trump unveiled a plan to end the cold war. In 2000, he flirted with running for president, though his distaste for shaking hands (he fears germs) posed a problem in politics. Now "The Donald" is emerging...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker I've always gotten a kick out of Donald Trump. When I edited NEWSWEEK's Business section in the late '80s, one of my first covers was on the flamboyant king of Manhattan skyscrapers and Atlantic City casinos. "Trump: A Billion-Dollar...
The Firm of Edwards & Edwards; If You Think John Edwards Is a True Believer, Get a Load of His Better Half
Byline: Melinda Henneberger Elizabeth Edwards is flying solo on the stump for her husband, Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards, and hoists her own bag into the overhead bin. Yet the wife of the self-described "people's senator" seems...
The World According to Trump; Just a Decade Ago, He Was a Punch Line, a Combed-Over Relic from the Decade of Greed. but He's Back, and Bigger Than Ever, Thanks to His New Hit Reality Show 'The Apprentice.' Why We Still Love to Ogle His Houses, His Helicopters and His Hair-And to Hear Him Say: 'You're Fired'
Byline: Keith Naughton and Marc Peyser, With Barney Gimbel and Vanessa Juarez Like the gold-encrusted doors to his Fifth Avenue apartment, everything Donald Trump says is over the top, outrageous and in desperate need of being toned down by 20 percent....
Undone by Destiny; an Afghan Rebel May Have Been Able to Stop Osama-And 9/11
Byline: Steve Coll, From "Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001," by Steve Coll. To be published by Penguin Press. (c) 2004 by Steve Coll. By summer 1999, only one proven...
What I Never Learned at 'Mommy and Me'; the World Seems to Get Scarier Every Day, and, for the First Time, I Don't Know How to Comfort My Son
Byline: Kathy Stevenson, Stevenson lives in Haverford, Pa. My son sits tensely on the couch watching the nightly television news while words are spoken that no 17-year-old child should hear: "Because of heightened security concerns, the terrorism...