Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 26

A Deadly Face off; the U.S. Military Is the Biggest, Toughest Force in Iraq by Far. but Power Cannot Ensure Calm. That's Why the Psy-Ops Guys Are Worried
Byline: Melinda Liu and Rod Nordland, With Babak Dehghanpisheh and bureau reports Iraq is almost under control. The men in charge are trying to pretend so, anyway. But after the past two weeks of bloodshed, "control" is a slippery term. When the...
A Failed-State Mr. Fix-It; the Bush Administration Didn't Have Much Time for the United Nations. Then Iraq Unraveled, and Lakhdar Brahimi Got a Call
Byline: Rod Nordland in Baghdad and Christopher Dickey in Paris with Tamara Lipper in Washington Lakhdar Brahimi seemed weary just talking about his 10 days in Iraq. As the U.N. envoy relaxed for a stopover at his Paris apartment last weekend, he...
Calls of the Wild; the Phone Business Is in Turmoil-Cellular Is Growing, and Now Every Line into Your Home Can Be Used to Carry Calls. A User's Guide to Help You Tame the Telecom Beasts
Publisher correction: May 05, 2004 In the April 26 story "Calls of the Wild," about Internet telephones, we wrote that iconnect.com was a private company. In fact, iconnect should have appeared as iConnectHere.com, which is the consumer division of...
Day at the Beach
You've got your iPod, your sun hat, your sandals, books and toys for the kids. Bet you didn't think to bring smiley-faced silverware. Now your day's in the bag. 1. Waikiki hat Helen Kaminski Stash the Uggs and try on this Aussie beauty. $168 at...
Generation Ambivalent; on the Eve of the Biggest Abortion-Rights March in a Decade, Organizers Try to Attract a Younger Crowd
Byline: Debra Rosenberg, With Holly Bailey in Washington, Hilary Shenfeld at Northwestern and Emi Kolawale at Wellesley One night last week in downtown Washington, D.C., the NARAL Pro-Choice America "march action center" hummed like a campaign headquarters...
Get Back Home, Loretta; A Country Legend Inspired by a Rocking White Stripe
Byline: Lorraine Ali There are at least half a dozen sequined gowns stuffed into the small closet on Loretta Lynn's big purple tour bus. "I like this one a whole lot," she says, running her hand down the shiny satin skirt of a beaded yellow number....
Helping the Needy Crack the Tax Code; for Some Families, a Refund Means Food and Shelter. Too Many Don't Know How to Claim What's Theirs
Byline: Bob Burke, Burke lives in Chicago. I was fresh out of college and working as a finance consultant in 1994 when I volunteered for my firm's tutoring-and-mentoring program at Holy Family School on Chicago's impoverished West Side. I coached...
Here Comes Your Band; after a 12-Year Hiatus, the Wild, Seminal Pixies Reunite
Byline: Devin Gordon The late Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain once said of "Smells Like Teen Spirit," the most famous song he ever wrote, "Basically, I was trying to rip off the Pixies." A few months after Cobain copped to the theft, the Pixies broke...
'I Haven't Suffered Doubt'; Bush Wanted to Invade Iraq. What's Striking, Bob Woodward's New Book Reports, Is How Little He Discussed It with Anyone
Byline: Evan Thomas It was Monday, Jan. 13, 2003, and President George W. Bush had just told his secretary of State, Colin Powell, that he was going to war in Iraq. "You know you're going to be owning this place?" inquired Powell. According to Washington...
Intelligence: Tenet and the CIA: A Survivor's Troubles
Byline: Michael Hirsh with Mark Hosenball Asked how long George Tenet might stay on, intelligence officials won't say. But they point out that Tenet recently surpassed Richard Helms as the second-longest-serving CIA director and, with seven years...
Making the Right Call; New Tech Too Scary? Sweat the Small Stuff to Cut Phone Bills
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Until new, cheaper technologies such as VoIP become more available, try saving money on your current bills. Here's how: Talk less. E-mail or instant-message instead. Cancel long-distance service if you don't make...
My Big Fat Green Sequel; 'Shrek 2' Is about to Reanimate DreamWorks. an Exclusive Advance Look at One Enchanted Ogre
Byline: Sean Smith Captain Hook is playing the blues. At a dive bar in a forest, the Ugly Stepsister is hawking booze, the Headless Horseman is hammered and the king is hiring a hit man to kill Shrek. Can you blame him? The ogre has won the heart...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin Q&A: Janice Dickinson Janice Dickinson isn't content to just boss around the contestants on "America's Next Top Model." In her new book, "Everything About Me Is Fake... And I'm Perfect," the outspoken former model gives...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: FOX News, Associated Press, The Washington Post (2), New York Times, Associated Press, WCBS-TV, New York, CNN, Newsweek, Blender Magazine "He is one of many others." Unidentified gunman, referring...
Scandal: Anti-U.N. Campaign
Byline: Mark Hosenball United Nations officials are reacting with resentment to a campaign by conservative media and pols alleging that top U.N. officials are implicated in a scandal surrounding a U.N.-operated Oil-for-Food Program that sold Iraqi...
Shock and Awe in Iraq; U.S. Army Sgt. James Amyett Told the Washington Post, 'I Guess the Iraqis Didn't Get the Memo That the War Is Over.'
Byline: George F. Will Aleksandr Kerensky died in New York in 1970. He had lived there since the 1940s, also spending time at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. From May 1918 to 1940 he lived in Western Europe, editing newspapers and...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Magazine work can be murder on your back. Editors and writers (who usually aren't the most fit and limber people to begin with) work long hours, hunched over computer screens, often under intense deadline pressure. Over the...
'The End of Dreams'; Ariel Sharon's New Initiative, Endorsed by President Bush, Is a Scheme to Better Manage the Conflict, Not to Make Peace. Targeted Killings Will Be a Big Part of That
Byline: Joshua Hammer, With Joanna Chen in Jerusalem Maj. Gen. Yisrael Ziv first tried to kill Sheik Ahmed Yassin last September. He remembers the day well, and with some regret. As Israel's chief of military operations, Ziv had ordered an airstrike...
The Gospel According to George; the Press Wanted Contrition. Maybe They Don't Understand the Man. Bush's Faith Will Guide Him-In Iraq and at the Polls
Byline: Howard Fineman and Tamara Lipper, With Richard Wolffe in Washington and T. Trent Gegax with Kerry In the Oval Office, George W. Bush's aides warned him that the press conference he was about to hold would be contentious. Reporters "will...
The Great Back Debate; Is Massage Better for You Than Surgery? as Millions of Americans Seek Relief from This Ancient Ailment, Doctors Are Trying Simpler, Less Invasive Ways to End the Agony
Publisher correction: May 05, 2004 Our April 26 story about back pain stated that Dr. Dan Cherkin of the Group Health Cooperative's Center for Health Studies is conducting the first large trial of chiropractic treatment for back pain. In fact, his trial...
The President Must Command; What the Iraq Question Needs Right Now Is a Totally Engaged American President, Immersed in Every Element of the Military Operation
Byline: Fareed Zakaria, Write the author at comments@fareedzakaria.com. Desperate to stop the transition in Iraq from coming apart, the United States has finally done what it said it would never do--give the United Nations a central political role....
The Road to the Brig; after 9/11, Justice and Defense Fought over How to Deal with Suspected Terrorists. How a New System Was Hatched
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Daniel Klaidman, Graphic by Meredith Sadin In September 2002, just before the first anniversary of the September 11 attacks, a group of senior Bush administration officials convened for a secret videoconference to make...
Want a Piece of Me? Got $100K? the Fact That Shares of Berkshire Hathaway Are about to Hit That Price Is a Classic Example of How Warren Buffett Always Goes His Own Way
Byline: Allan Sloan, Sloan is Newsweek's Wall Street editor. His e-mail is sloan@panix.com. This is a great time for Warren Buffett junkies. The Berkshire Hathaway annual shareholders' meeting, a weekend of wall-to-wall Warren, is less than two...