Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 129, Spring-Summer

A Bundle of Emotions
A Repetoire of Cries All babies cry, and usually for good reason. Before they learn to talk, crying is one way to express their needs and send out signals of distress. Examples of three typical cries, and their differences in volume, pitch and rhythm:...
Advise and Consent
There are baby books galore. A guide to the best of the lot. THE SHELVES OF any homes groan under the weight of parenting books. some are truly awful--ponderously written and clumsily organized. Others offer little more than what most parents would...
Beyond an Apple a Day
Don't fret if your toddler throws broccoli. When children choose their own menus, they do surprisingly well. ELLYN SATTER, A dietitian and family therapist in Madison, Wis., likes to remember the small boy whose mother brought him into Satter's...
Building a Better Self-Image
The renowned pediatrician explains why early interactions are so vital in teaching children about themselves, their world and success WE ARE PAYING A TERRIBLE PRICE for our nation's inattention to the increasing stresses on children and families....
Cultivating the Mind
Children come preprogrammed to learn. How can parents help? Be patient, keep talking and soon you will hear those magic words: Dads, can I borrow the car? The Baby's Brain ... When a baby is born, primitive structures in the brain-those controlling...
Doing the Best for Our Kids: The First Lady Calls for Americans to Work Together and Give Parents the Tools They Need to Raise Their Children - and Provide Them with a Lifetime of Learning
The First Lady calls for Americans to work together and give parents the tools they need to raise their children and provide them with a lifetime of learning SOMETIMES IT SEEMS THAT TIME HASN'T always been an ally to us parents. As Bill and I have...
Eating Well for Two
PAYING ATTENTION TO the nutrients a baby receives should begin well before conception. Smart pre-natal care now means "pre-conceptual care": because embryonic organ development begins about 17 days after sperm and egg unite, before many women realize...
Finding a Web of Support
Online sites offer information and a sense of community PARK BENCHES will always be great places to pick up parenting tips, So will back fences, doctors' offices and boardrooms. But for families of children with disabilities, all the chats in the...
Fragile: Handle with Care
Shaken-baby syndrome can cause blindness, developmental delays and permanent brain damage EACH YEAR, THOUSANDS OF YOUNG CHILDREN suffer brain injury or die from being violently shaken. Children as old as 5 are vulnerable to shaken-baby syndrome...
Giving Infants a Helping Hand
Of course kids need hugs. But physical contact may also help preemies gain weight faster and healthy babies digest food better. IN BETWEEN CRUSADES AND IDEOLOGICALA battles with the pope, the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II had time to conduct a...
Good Kid, Bad Kid
From scary tantrums to a flat refusal to get dressed in the morning, young children keep testing their limits-- and yours. Take a deep breath and try not to flunk. SURE, MAYBE WE CAN CLONE sheep, but what about trying to get a young child dressed?...
Helping Families Help Themselves
Like so many other American cities, Hampton, Va., is full of parents who need help. But instead of settling for easy denunciations, the town is trading rhetoric for action. TWO YEARS AGO, MICHELE DAVILA--poor, single, clinically depressed and expecting...
Hey - Look out, World, Here I Come
ELIANA, 14 MONTHS OLD, REFUSES TO WALK. SHE has never attempted to stand alone, much less take a step. The other four children in her play group, however, have all earned the right to be called toddler: they started staggering on two feet right around...
How to Build a Baby's Brain
A baby is born with a head on her shoulders and a mind primed for learning. But it takes years of experience--looking, listening, playing, interacting with parents--to wire the billions of complex neural circuits that govern language, math, music,...
It's a Wise Father Who Knows ... His Child
... his child. If Dad helps with the rearing, the baby is likely to grow up stronger, smarter and more in control. HIS IS OFTEN the first face the newborn sees, looming out of the dimness of the delivery room, open-mouthed with wonder at the creature...
Off to a Good Start: Why the First Three Years Are So Crucial to a Child's Development
IT IS A MOMENT YOU never forget the first time you hold your baby in your arms. Who is this mysterious new person? Before long, you will know the difference between a cry of hunger and a cry for comfort, a genuine grin and the grimace produced by an...
Pots, Blocks & Socks
THE BABY IS DUE SOON, SO you're out buying the normal stuff- diapers, receiving blankets, towels, powder, creams. Think you're done? Only if you're immune from guilt. Nowadays you'd be hard pressed to call yourself a conscientious parent unless you've...
Preventing a Hard Day's Night
Should babies be left to cry themselves to sleep? Should they sleep with you? Not even experts agree on the best bedtime formula. EVER WISH YOUR INFANT or toddler would learn to sleep like a baby? You're not the only one. Sheryl and Steve Hersch,...
Raising a Moral Child
A child's first few years of life are the key to whether you wind up with a darling or a delinquent. What may ultimately become empathy, generosity or charity stems initially from a child's selfish preoccupations. FIRST COMES HEALTH. "DOCTOR," every...
Rooting for Intelligence
Breast-feeding is good for health and bonding. And mother's milk may have another payoff: boosting a child's IQ scores. BREAST MILK MAY be Mother Nature's ultimate food. It's potent enough to keep babies alive for the first 16 weeks of life. It...
Shyness, Sadness, Curiosity, Joy: Is It Nature or Nurture?
The wizards of genetics keep closing in on the biological roots of personality. It's not your imagination that one baby seems born cheerful and another morose. But that's not the complete picture. DNA is not destiny;, experience plays a powerful role,...
The Debate over Discipline
YOUR KID IS FLINGING food, whacking his sister and screaming endlessly. What do you do? As you carefully consider your range of choices, consider this: how you discipline your child in the early years will go a long way in determining whether your...
The Great Ages of Discovery
They start swaddled and protected; Mom is just an appendage. Then everybody else starts showing up: grandparents, siblings, babysitters, friends and eventually salesmen. They're a little taste of the world to come. Children can learn lessons from them...
The Language Explosion
BARRY IS A PIXIE-FACED 3-YEAR-OLD WHO CAN'T yet draw a circle or stack his blocks in a simple pattern. There is little chance he will ever live independently. He may never learn to tie his own shoes. Yet Barry is as chatty and engaging a person as...
The Loving Ties That Bond
A baby needs to form a secure 'attachment' to the mother or another caring adult. How do these early relationships develop trust--and why do some of them fail? WHEN GOSLINGS hatch, they will immediately become attached to the first moving object...
The Magnetic Tube: The Hand That Rocks the Cradle May Rule the World, but the Hand That Holds the Remote May Be More Important. It's Never Too Early to Start Watching What Your Kids Watch
The hand that rocks the cradle may rule the world, but the hand that holds the remote may be more important. It's never too early to start watching what your kids watch. CARLA MEESKE IS NOT the type to fret over the niceties of child-development...
The New Preschool
Teaching nursery school is not about formal lessons. It's about listening and guiding, helping little children to make sense of the big world they're entering. LISTEN TO THE SNAP, crackle, pop of baby neurons. Teacher Martha Rodriguez crouches near...
The Tiniest Patients: Fetal and Pediatric Surgery Can Save Babies Who Once Didn't Have a Chance
Fetal and pediatric surgery can save babies who once didn't have a chance WHEN I BEGAN MY SURGICAL CAREER 85 years ago, there was no such thing as "pediatric surgery." Back in the 1940s there were only a handful of us who were devoted to what was...
The Top 10 Health Worries: Babies Don't Break, but Some Symptoms Are Cause for Real Alarm
Babies don't break, but some symptoms are cause for real alarm YOU'VE JUST BEEN HANDED your seven-pound bundle of joy and your first reaction is: Help! How do I keep from breaking it? Take heart. Babies may not bounce, but neither do they get a...
To Dose or Not to Dose?
New studies suggest that antibiotics may be no more effective than the body's immune system in battling ear infections THE INTRODUCTION of antibiotics during World War II represented perhaps the greatest medical advance since the discovery that...
Turning on the Motor
Babies start their engines at the same time, but some may be crawling while others are tottering across the room. No matter what speed, they all cross the finish line. Growing Up, Step by Step As any parent can attest, children grow at their...
When a Child's Silence Isn't Golden
Some toddlers don't say a word. Should their parents simply be patient--or send them to 'speech-language' therapy? MALINDA Boyd is increasingly worried about her 18-month-old son, Ryan. At 15 months, Ryan said absolutely nothing. Now he has a handful...
Where Can You Turn
AVID "TELE-PARENTS" WILL TELL YOU THAT THERE'S nothing like a phone jack and 16 megabytes of RAM for navigating the mysteries, hurdles and hassles of life with an infant or toddler. If only you had Netscape and a 28.8 modem--or at least speed-dial--...
Will It Be on the Test?
It's not always enough just to rely on what comes naturally. Parents can take classes that will teach them what to do. CONTRARY TO THE adage, babies do come with instruction manuals. They are called families. Traditionally, experienced relatives...
'Your Baby Has a Problem.'(birth Defects; Special Edition: Your Child)
Three out of 100 newborns suffer birth defects. But more and more of them can now hope to lead normal lives. "THERE IS A PROBLEM," THE doctors say. But even before the words are out you've seen it in their eyes, sensed it in the way they peered...
You've Come a Long Way, Baby
Few areas of medicine have changed as dramatically as pediatrics. Just a couple of generations ago, parents of young children worried about polio, measles, rubella and whooping cough. Today's concerns are different: asthma, antibiotics and new vaccines....