Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 130, No. 4, July 28

A Death Spiral: After Years of Decline, Apple Needs a Strategy - and a Savior
Talk About Fiddling While Rome burns. As Apple Computer laid off workers and hemorrhaged money, how did chief executive Gilbert F. Amelio spend his days? Discussing upgrades to his personal jet, insiders say, and planning his new executive offices....
An Animal Superhighway? Activists Propose an 1,800-Mile Corridor to Let Wildlife Roam in the West
For four years scientists had tracked Pluie, a female wolf collared outside Canada's Banff National Park, as she made her way up and down the Rockies. She made three round trips between Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming and Alberta, covering 40,000...
Cell Phones: A Call from the Wild
High atop the grand Teton Mountains, the climbers were caught in a vicious hailstorm. Terrified and desperate, they did what any self-respecting backpackers of the '90s do -- whip out the cell phone and yelp for help. Rescuers found a group of tenderfoots...
Chariots of Fire
There is a myth a lot of people still have about fans of stock-car racing, that if they didn't have a race to go to, they would be just as happy to spread a little 10W-40 on the street and watch the neighbors crash into each other. But anyone who...
Cultivating Qi: More and More Westerners Are Discovering Qigong, an Ancient Amalgam of Dance and Meditation with a Range of Physical Benefits
It's a noisy, fume-choked July afternoon in midtown Manhattan. Tempers are flaring in the crushing traffic and stifling heat of West 34th Street. But inside the Source of Life Center, half a block from the Empire State Building, Terry Costiga and...
Damage Control
The senate investigation into campaign-financing malpractice may be only in its early stages, but already the ritual responses have become pretty clear. They have, of course, been greatly helped along by the manipulations and spin of those the investigation...
Facing Death
Andrew Cunanan was a great and gaudy pretender. He improved upon his breeding, his education, his employment (he had none), even his name. He created, out of his imagination, a flamboyant persona, the rich homosexual playboy who waves a fat cigar...
Get That Ute off the Highway
The 4x4 is the epitome of suburban chic. One in seven cars sold in the United States today is a sport utility vehicle, but we all know Americans aren't buying them for rugged, outdoorsy reasons. Take Michael Egan, 36: he got a Range Rover for his...
Gold Mountain
The first thing you hear about Charles Frazier is that he's shy. It is also the second thing you hear, and the third. When you finally speak to him on the phone, he gives you directions to his home outside Raleigh, N.C., where he raises show ponies...
Holy Cow! That's Some Bull
We're Tired of Writing About Dow "Milestones." and by now you should be tired of reading about them. So instead of hashing over the 8000 Dow, let's look at some amazing numbers dating back to the summer of including reinvested dividends, has multiplied...
Invasion of the Tree Snakes and Other Coming Infestations
It's midnight on Guam, and an eightfoot-long brown tree snake has just emerged from a toilet bowl. After hours of slithering through sewage pipes, she's hungry. She slides across the bathroom floor into the room where a baby lies sleeping. The snake...
Just Skin and Bones
It's a slow-motion catastrophe largely hidden from outsiders. But the latest visitors to North Korea confirm the world's worst fears. A nation of 23 million people is starving, slowly and painfully. "Mere survival is becoming more and more difficult,"...
Legacy of a Celebrity Designer
Is no boring, my fashion," Gianni Versace once told me. Was no boring, his life, either. Whether he was creating a collection of dresses held together by safety pins, shuttling between palatial homes in Milan, Lake Como, South Beach and New York,...
Like a Woman Scorned
Princess Diana Has Stopped Taking potshots at her ex-husband, Prince Charles, if only for the sake of the children. But she still can't resist dissing his mistress. Diana refers to Camilla Parker Bowles as "the Rottweiler" (because of an alleged resemblance...
No Hits, Lots of Errors: AT&T Pulls off Another Bonehead Play
Watching AT&T These Days brings to mind the deathless line uttered by manager Casey Stengel about his 1962 New York Mets, the worst team in major-league history: "Can't anyone here play this game?" At AT&T, the answer would appear to be...
Oh, What a Feeling
Jeffery And Jeryl Brivic Went car shopping last fall knowing exactly what they wanted: a dark green Toyota RAV4 with a CD player. So they drove to their local Toyota store ready to do a deal. The salesman said it was their lucky day: the sport utility...
Sammy vs. Son of Sam: How the Mobster Cashed in on His Best-Selling Story
This much we know for sure: Salvatore (Sammy the Bull) Gravano has got a very big mouth. In 1992 his testimony put his former boss, the mobster John Gotti, behind bars for life. Prosecutors would use his testimony to convict 37 mobsters in subsequent...
Sex, Morality and the Protestant Minister: What Sexual Standards Should the Clergy Obey?
Although he wasn't married himself, Jesus had some rather clear teachings on the subject. Adultery was sin, he declared, and that included even lustful looks at another woman. He was tough on divorce, too, saying that anyone who divorces and marries...
Space Cadets
The mission control center outside Moscow looks straight out of central casting: five rows of earnest controllers peering intently at their monitors; a video screen showing the crew of the space station Mir; a wall-size projection of Mir's orbit,...
Straight Outta Cleveland: The Saga of Bone Thugs-N-Harmony
St. Clair and East 99th Street in Cleveland is a tough neighborhood to call home. A smaller version of Compton, Calif., complete with drive-bys, crackheads and street pharmacists, it's the kind of place where young black men die almost every day....
The Eggs, Embryos and I: After Years of Infertility, IVF and Now Three Children, I'm Struggling with a Difficult Choice
I have six potential children on ice in a hospital in southern California, and I don't know what to do with them. For seven years my husband and I suffered with the '90s affliction -- infertility. Our problem started in 1986 when we threw out the...
Too Poor to Treat: States Are Balking at Paying for Pricey AIDS Drugs
Ninety-six-point-three is the frequency of Justus Upton's favorite radio station in Jackson, Miss. It's also, by macabre coincidence, exactly how low his body temperature fell in 1995 until he took a drug called Zovirax Upton, 29 and HIV-positive,...
Two Sisters, One Identity: An Odd Murder May Be a Case of Sibling Rivalry
When Stevie Allman was hospitalized for first- and second-degree burns on her arms and legs, her neighbors were stunned. The 52-year-old woman was part of an anti-drug campaign in her working-class section of Oakland, Calif. She blamed her injuries...