Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 133, No. 20, May 17

A Straight Face
The World Series of Poker: earth's greatest liars gathered together with millions of dollars on the line. In one sprawling room of Binion's Horsehoe Casino, they duel for flat-out psychological domination. Cards fly to and fro, chips get stacked in...
Battle Behind the Screen
On Feb. 10, 8 million households tuned in to "Dateline NBC" and a parade of wrenching, now familiar images. A toddler killed at a church picnic, a comatose preacher--and a possible safety flaw in a car. Stone Phillips described how a series of glitches...
Bell of the Brawl
AT&T's $60 billion purchase of cable-TV giant MediaOne isn't your typical boring megabuck takeover. Rather, it's a corporate soap opera, with big money, intrigue, tax-avoidance games and double- and triple- dealing. All that's missing is sex. Here's...
Buy a House Site Unseen
From the comfort of their home office in Belgium, Jerome and Leslie Blair found their dream house: a stunning four-bedroom overlooking Chicago's scenic Lake Shore Drive. Instead of jetting across the Atlantic Ocean to visit properties, they simply...
CBS Gets Ready to Gumbel
In the battleground that is morning television, "CBS This Morning" has long been General Custer. In an effort to take on NBC's soaring "Today" and ABC's revitalized "Good Morning America," CBS announced Tuesday that Bryant Gumbel would take the reins...
Courting a Crypto Win
You would think that the U.S. government would have little to fear from Dan Bernstein, John Gilmore and Cindy Cohn. Bernstein was a Berkeley grad student. Gilmore was a computer hacker retired from Sun Microsystems, now an amateur civil libertarian....
Cramming for 'The Test', Would Your Kids Pass?
The students at Peirce School in West Newton, Mass., are sharpening their pencils. They're practicing topic sentences and rememorizing the scientific method. It sounds like the cramming that goes on at the colleges that dot the surrounding Boston suburbs....
Dollarizing-A Black Hole
Down with "dollarization." By all rights, Americans should feel flattered by the latest scheme to save the world economy. It advises many poorer countries to adopt the dollar as their official national money. This would (the argument goes) guarantee...
Duncan's Day
Of the more than 1,100 baskets Tim Duncan has scored in two stellar seasons in the NBA, a single dunk last week was for him a defining-- make that a redefining--moment. The sole criticism of the 23-year-old San Antonio Spur has been that he is too...
Ghost of Everest
He must have died near, or even after, sunset, because he had taken off his goggles and stowed them in a pocket. The unnervingly white skin of his back was bare to the sky where the wind had flayed off his clothing, seven layers of cotton and wool....
In China, Fury and Fallout
The bombs fell in belgrade, but the fallout spread all the way to Beijing. In the Chinese capital, thousands of protesters turned out Saturday, chanting "Down with American imperialists" and "NATO Nazis." Roving gangs pelted U.S. Embassy buildings...
'It Is Not the Act of a Few Bad Apples'
Dr. Elmo Randolph's commute from Bergen County to his office near Newark usually takes only 40 minutes, but the 42-year-old African- American dentist hasn't always made it in on time. Since 1991, Randolph says he has been pulled over by state troopers...
'It Looked like a Bomb Went Off'
Jan Douglas had seen tornadoes before, but never one like this. It was stupendous, a half mile wide or more, a howling monster that picked up trucks, trees and railroad cars and shredded everything in its path for nearly 70 miles. When it rumbled into...
Katz Bites the Mouse
It was a day that Michael Eisner would undoubtedly like to forget. Sitting in a Los Angeles witness box for four hours last week, the usually unflappable chairman of the Walt Disney Co. struggled to maintain his composure. Eisner's protege turned nemesis,...
Letters
Whose Heritage Is It? The earliest Americans may have included ice-age Europeans, according to our April 26 cover story, "Who Were the First Americans?" Some readers worried that recently unearthed skulls with European traits could threaten Native...
MBA: Managed by Agent
Celebrities have agents. So do professional athletes. Why not business executives? After all, the much-ballyhooed talent shortage has created tremendous demand for capable executives. But who has time for plotting the next job hop, skip or jump? Break...
Moving beyond the Blame Game
A month after the Littleton tragedy, the conversation continues--in schools, in homes and at this week's White House conference on youth violence. The theories of why Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold went on their rampage have given way to a broader discussion...
Personal Politics, Barak: Breaking Up the Mood of Permanent Gloominess, Netanyahu: Some Say Superb, Others Say Far from It, Deri: Great Agitation within the Sephardic Community
To Bibi or not to Bibi: that is the question that dominates everything," jokes veteran Israeli pollster Hanoch Smith. It is a shorthand way of saying that the elections next week for prime minister and Parliament have come down to a referendum on the...
Postcards from the Edge of the Galaxy
Picture this: I'm in Westwood Village, seeing "The Matrix." Keanu Reeves is looking very buff and Prada. I'm alone. My daughter, Billie, and I saw the TV ad where Keanu's mouth starts mutating, and Billie thought it was interesting. But Billie's too...
Sergeant Friday, Where Are You?
My head is full of TV cops. I love "Dragnet's" unflappable Joe Friday. I'm fascinated by the savvy detectives of "Homicide: Life on the Street." I've guiltily enjoyed the wrangling of lowlifes on "Cops." An innocent person, television tells me, has...
Sleepless and Cranky
Until just a month ago, Sarah Karmin, 21/2, was peaceably closing her eyes at 8:30 p.m. and awakening 12 hours later. A model sleeper. Then suddenly, she was refusing to go to bed before midnight, and staying up between 2:30 and 7 a.m. "It's just been...
Spaced-Out Siblings
Scott Schoenick knows what people think when they hear that his three children are 15, 10 and 2 years old. "They go, 'Oh, trophy wife!' " In fact, Scott, 42, and his wife, Kathy, 41, were high-school sweethearts who got married 20 years ago. Mainly...
Star Wars: The Phantom Movie
Twenty-two years ago "Star Wars" came out of nowhere, and changed the world. "Star Wars: Episode I, The Phantom Menace" comes out amid a cacophony of media hype, carrying on its shoulders the wildest hopes of several generations of worshipful moviegoers....
Strapping Them In
Last February Christine Guarino drove to a car dealership in Germantown, Md., where a team of experts inspected the car seats holding her two sons. They found problems: Collin, 3, needed tighter straps, and Stephen, 5, should have been using a seat...
The $25 Million Secret
It almost seemed like piling on. TV viewers had already decided they were tired of the wretched excesses of daytime talk TV, taking not just Jenny Jones down a ratings notch, but Sally and Rosie and Montel, too. (Only Jerry Springer still holds up.)...
The Lee Case: 'No Smoking Gun'
What Sen. Don Nickles last week called possibly "the most serious case of espionage in U.S. history" may not result in spying charges against a man suspected of sharing secrets with the Chinese. A top administration official told NEWSWEEK that the...
The Really Early Birds
Archaeopteryx had a pretty decent wingspan for a half-pound bird, more than 20 inches. That should have been ample to keep the crow-sized bird flying, or at least gliding, through the Jurassic skies. But as anyone who's ever watched a space shot knows,...
The Selling of Star Wars
The emperor is all-powerful, all-knowing. Nothing escapes the reach of the Empire. Not even the steely New York Times. Earlier this year the paper's Sunday Arts and Leisure Section ordered up a piece on George Lucas and his new $115 million "Star...
Watch out for Hurricane W
Back east, thunderheads were forming over George W. Bush's campaign. A conservative columnist taunted the governor of Texas for failing to push a voucher plan through his legislature, even though his kid brother (and fellow governor) had done just...
What Do We Do Now?
NATO was having a bad day. Friday morning a stray cluster bomb hit a hospital and market in the southern Yugoslav city of Nis. Serb officials said 15 civilians had died. Then, just before midnight, three bombs slammed into the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade,...