Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 9

America to Milosevic: Step Aside: His Machine Is Falling Apart like a Balkans Humpty Dumpty, Never to Be Put Back Together Again
On Sept. 24 the Yugoslav people went to the polls in record numbers, and voted by a wide margin to replace Slobodan Milosevic's discredited regime with a new and democratic one. Not surprisingly, Milosevic is refusing to accept the verdict of his people,...
Anna's New Assets
Now Anna Nicole Smith is more well endowed than ever. Last week a federal bankruptcy judge in Los Angeles awarded the former Playboy pinup and Guess? jeans model nearly $450 million, ruling that she was deprived of money that her late husband, Texas...
AUSCHWITZ: Dancing on Old Graves: A Controversial Disco Sparks a Tense Holocaust Debate
It's another Saturday night at Disco System, the hottest new club in Oswiecim, Poland, and the crowd is ready to party. Steam billows from the dance floor and strobe lights flicker madly as a dozen scantily clad girls gyrate to the pulsating beat of...
Battle for the Soul of Hip-Hop: Is Rap-Increasingly Driven by Sex, Violence and Money-Going Too Far? You'd Be Surprised Who Thinks So. the Hip-Hop Elite Squares off over the Future of Its Music and Videos
Like news quizzes? Here's a stumper. What public figure said this last week to a NEWSWEEK reporter? "In terms of what certain media outlets show you, it's very one-dimensional. It's not just hip-hop music--TV and movies in general are very narrow....
Breaking the Tape: Track » Marion Jones's Dream Ended in the Long-Jump Pit, but Her Five Medals Secured Her Place as Fastest Woman Alive
At the heart of the legend of Marion Jones is the story of how, 8 years old and enchanted by the L.A. Games, she neatly chalked on a blackboard in her bedroom, "I'm going to be an Olympic champion." But in recent years, Jones's ambitions have inflated...
Can the Body Control HIV Infection without Drugs? Early Findings Suggest That Intensive Early Treatment May Arm the Immune System against the AIDS Virus
The patient had stayed home from work one day three years ago because he thought he had the flu. But as he read a front-page article in a Boston newspaper, he got worried. The article described a flulike syndrome that people develop shortly after contracting...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Casio Steps Into the Frame Who will be the next Bond? With Casio's new WQV1-1CR visual-databank watch, it could be you. The camera's black-and-white images are easy to upload to your PC via an infrared link, and it's ideal for sneaking...
Health Notes
DEPRESSION Sweating It Away Deep depression can make it hard to get off the couch, but preliminary evidence suggests that exercise may be a powerful remedy. Last year, in a study of 56 severely depressed people, Duke University scientists found that...
Look Closely at That Bill: Frivolous Medical Charges Are Not Always Easy to Spot. but with a Little Effort, You Can Avoid Paying $10 for a Box of Tissues or $18 for a Trash Bag
When William Conner received his hospital bill for cardiac surgery, his newly repaired heart nearly stopped. The 54-year-old contractor was stunned to find that the surgery had cost $17,000 more than his insurance was willing to pay. In a state of...
My Culture at the Crossroads: A Rap Devotee Watches Corporate Control and Apolitical Times Encroach on the Music He Has Loved All His Life
I am a hip-hop head for life. I have tagged my moniker-- "kepo1"--on walls; break-danced on cardboard; bumped elbows with fellow hip-hoppers at legendary clubs like The Rooftop, Union Square and Latin Quarter in New York City, and done everything from...
New Money for College: The Candidates Propose More Aid for the Middle Class. Will the Poor Be Boosted, Too?
The country is loaded with tax-sheltered college-savings and investment plans. They're stacking up like planes over O'Hare. Naturally, we now have two more--a Bush plan and a Gore plan. No candidate dares overlook the taxpaying parents of college-bound...
Periscope
CAMPAIGN 2000 A Wild Mole Hunt Heats Up Who mailed George W. Bush's confidential debate-prep material to a Gore adviser? As the FBI escalated its investigation last week, the case seemed to grow wilder and more mysterious. Agents focused on a low-level...
Perspectives
"It was either another face-lift or Barbra. I chose Barbra." A woman in New York picking up her $2,500 ticket for one of Barbra Streisand's last live concerts "This is not a magic pill, and it's not going to end the abortion debate in the United...
RU-486 and the Right to Choose: Cheering, Wailing, Hailing, Damning-The Abortion Pill Is Important but No Panacea
The legal right to choose to have an abortion in America has always been a kind of mirage. On Jan. 22, 1973, when the Supreme Court handed down one of its best-known decisions, Roe v. Wade, its supporters hailed it in simple and eloquent terms. The...
Same Old Song: Controversy over Pop Music Is as Old as Elvis, but Now We're in a Cultural Arms Race
All the controversy, criticism and praise surrounding Eminem's recent release "The Marshall Mathers LP" finally caused a fiftyish co-worker of mine to go out and buy the album to see what all the commotion was about. It's not as if he was treading...
Slobo's Endgame: An Electoral Backlash Has Milosevic Reeling, but the Old Survivor Isn't Likely to Go Quietly. Why the Strongman Is on the Ropes
Throughout the night, Vojislav Kostunica stayed in his tiny office, often secluded from his advisers, lost in silent contemplation. Just outside his door, a handful of trusted aides milled about Democratic Party of Serbia headquarters, anxiously monitoring...
The Abortion Pill: The French Call It RU-486; Americans Will Soon Be Able to Get Mifeprex, the Pills That May Take Abortion Services out of the Clinics and into the Doctor's Office. the FDA's Approval of the Drug Is Opening a New Medial and Legal Front of the Battle over Abortion
On the afternoon last week that the Food and Drug Administration gave its approval to 4mifepristone, the abortion pill known as RU-486, Emily Green was calling it "weird good news." Good news because she is pro-choice. Weird because it came just a...
The 'Angel' in a Shoot-Out: A Dot-Com Billionaire Dives Deep into the Gun War
Andrew McKelvey made a fortune finding the Next Big Thing. In 1967 he borrowed $18,000 and turned it into TMP Worldwide, a leading seller of yellow-page ads. Five years ago he bought little-known Monster.com, the job-placement Web site that made him...
The Bases Gird for Battle: In the Trenches, Robertson's Troops Prep for Election Day
The morning after the FDA approved RU-486, ban the abortion pill placards popped up at the Christian Coalition convention in Washington. Pro-life activists were buzzing about the decision in the hallways. But when Pat Robertson gave the welcoming address,...
The Focus Shifts to Ford: The Automaker Is Working to Rebuild Drivers' Confidence in the Explorer
At first, the death of 14-year- old cheerleader Jessica LeAnn Taylor seemed simply to be a tragic tire failure. While heading for a football game in Mexia, Texas, on a hot October afternoon in 1998, the Ford Explorer in which Taylor was riding flipped...
The Politics of Fear: Do Bloody Riots in Jerusalem Portend a Political Comeback for Bibi Netanyahu?
Anywhere else it might have been a routine campaign stop at a religious shrine--classic photo-op politics. But the politician was Israel's right-wing opposition leader Ariel Sharon, and the shrine was perhaps the most combustible 35 acres on earth....
The Real Olympics: Magic Moments » Watching the Olympics Live Beats the Packaged Spectacle on NBC, Hands Down
Let's be honest. There were two Olympic Games this year. One was the prepackaged, tape-delayed show that many Americans (well, not that many) watched with lukewarm enthusiasm. The other was the raw, unfiltered spectacle that the athletes and spectators...
The Real Stuff: Main Event: As the Debates Begin, Look for Sharp Exchanges between Gore and Bush on Tax Cuts, Retirement, Education, Energy, Prescription Drugs-And a Few Surprises. How to Tell Substance from Spin
GOVERNOR BUSH: You're a shameless flip-flopper on the Petroleum Reserve. VICE PRESIDENT GORE: And you and Cheney are the oiliest ticket ever. BUSH: Look who's talking. Your family's got Occidental Petroleum money. GORE: That's my mother's...
'The Sopranos' of Serbia: Bambiland, the 'Belgrade Recipe' and Other Balkan Tales
When it comes to dysfunctional mob clans, the Sopranos of New Jersey have nothing on the Serbs of Belgrade. The battle between Slobodan Milosevic and his political opponents over who runs the country has rarely been bloody, at least so far. But turf...
The Surplus Fantasy: THE BOTTOM LINE: If All the Talk about the Surplus Sounds Too Good to Be True, That's Because It Probably Is. Still, Bush and Gore Offer Unusually Specific Numbers. the Figures May Be Fudged, but We've Got a Clear Choice. the Truth Behind the Speeches
For those of us who care about things like the federal budget, taxes, Social Security and how much national debt it's fair to inflict on our children, there's good news out there. Really. Both major presidential candidates are actually putting cost...
Time to Get the Message: Chalk One Up for the Feds for Pressuring AOL to Open Up Its Instant-Messaging Service
Neither Steve Case--nor any of his fellow top executives at America Online--wanted to talk to me on the record about their company's instant-message strategy last week. Who can blame them? They know that I'd ask when they'll tear down the wall that...
Under the Shadow of Drugs: Doping » Tainted by Scandals, the IOC Starts to Crack Down
It was one thing to bust three Bulgarian weight lifters, a Latvian rower, a hammer thrower from Belarus and a Russian runner for doping, but little Andreea Raducan? When the IOC stripped the pixieish 16-year-old Romanian of her all-around gymnastics...
When Everything Is Secret, Nothing Is Safe: The Government Wields the Classified Label So Freely It's Almost Meaningless. Our Security May Suffer
For the better part of 25 years I have made my living as an investigative reporter, ferreting out national secrets and revealing what the government would not otherwise disclose. So it may seem strange to hear me say that I worry about our government's...