Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 20

A Clash in the Capitol: The New President Shouldn't Expect Much Sympathy from Either Party in a Contentious Congress-Or Much Help in Passing His Agenda
Dennis Hastert and Dick Gephardt don't spend much time trying to make each other happy. In the two years after the 1998 congressional elections, the Republican House speaker and the Democratic minority leader spoke so rarely that aides strained to...
A Muted Trumpet: Afterword: To a Degree Rare in Presidential Elections, People Chose Sides Less out of Affection for Their Own Man Than out of Dislike for His Rival
In the deepening autumn of 2000, the players in Washington not employed by George W. Bush or Al Gore were calling it the Seinfeld Election: a show about nothing--or, anyway, not very much. Their world and America's would change no matter which of the...
A Whiff of Victory . . . but Now It's War: After a Dead-Heat Election, the Bush-Gore Power Struggle Threatened to Veer out of Control. the Court Showdown-And the Search for Peace
Bill Daley was in the motorcade, frantically calling Al Gore upfront in the lead car. It was 2 a.m., and raining in Nashville, Tenn. The vice president was at the head of what looked like his own political funeral procession. He'd called George W....
Building a Better Election: Troubled by Botched Ballots and the Electoral College, Americans Rethink How We Vote
Is this any way to pick a president? In an age of instant messaging, MP3 players and wireless shopping, about 30 percent of voters still poke a hole in a piece of paper to cast their ballot. One fifth use the kind of balky lever machines introduced...
Calling All Swing States: Endgame: The Polls Seemed to Point to a Photo Finish, the Candidates Concentrated on the Main Electoral Battlegrounds-And George W. Bush Had to Cope with a Last-Minute Revelation
A week after the last debate, Bush strategist Karl Rove sat in his office in Austin, hung with black-and-white portraits of his heroes--Teddy Roosevelt, Gen. George S. Patton and Amelia Earhart, plungers all--and tried not to appear overconfident....
Caught in Clinton's Shadow: In the Beginning, Al Gore Blamed Clinton for the Failure of His Campaign to Catch Fire. Worried Aides Told Him That His Real Problem Was Himself
Why is Al so angry with me?" Bill Clinton would ask his aides from time to time during the spring of 1999. Clinton had been baffled, then upset, by the vice president's increasing chilliness. True, there had always been an edge of sibling rivalry between...
Clouds over the Sunshine State: How Confusing Ballots, Accidental Votes and Now a Swarm of Lawyers Are Roiling Florida like a Hurricane
By 4 p.m. on Election Day, Al Gore's emergency phone bank in Texas was calling thousands of Democrats in Palm Beach County, Fla. The ballot there was "confusing," the callers said. "Do you believe that you may have voted for the wrong candidate for...
Face to Face Combat: The Debates: Gore Lost Personality Points Even as He Scored Debating Points. This Was Turnaround II, and Bush Hit the Homestretch with a Burst of Confidence
George W. Bush would later credit his wife with stopping the downward slide. After the convention, Laura had been mostly missing from the campaign while she devoted herself to getting the twins off to college, Jenna to the University of Texas, Barbara...
George W. Wins the 'Phony War': Spring Fever: While Gore Searched for a Winning Campaign Theme, Bush Charmed Reporters and Laid out His Agenda
With their fondness for martial metaphors, political pros sometimes describe the long dead zone between the primaries and the political conventions as "the phony war." The term was originally coined for the strange, tense interlude between the German...
Gore's Summer Surprise: Turnaround: With His Vice Presidential Selection, a Long Kiss and Some Populist Oratry at the Convention, Al Gore Sprang into the Lead. His Campaign Had a Newfound Coherence, and Now It Was George W. Bush's Turn to Stumble
To the press and public, the turning point in the Gore campaign was the announcement of Gore's running mate, Joe Lieberman, on Aug. 7, a week before the Democratic convention in Los Angeles. But the true turnaround began earlier that summer with the...
Hillary Goes Up the Hill: The First Lady's Victory in New York Gives Her a Political Platform of Her Own. Her Future in the Senate --and What's Next for Her Husband
The honeymoon was over before it began. For years, ever since her health-care plan took a nose dive, Hillary Rodham Clinton has tried to rebuild her relations on Capitol Hill, toiling behind the scenes as she discreetly collaborated with members of...
Ignore the Hand-Wringing: This Isn't a Real Crisis (Yet), So Let's Relish the Absurdity-And Revel in the Civics Lesson
About once a generation the United States lives through a momentous political drama. Franklin Roosevelt's attempt to "pack" the Supreme Court in the 1930s. The Army-McCarthy hearings in the 1950s. Watergate in the 1970s. Now we've experienced two such...
Perspectives
"The American people have spoken, but it's going to take a little while to determine what they said." Bill Clinton, on the election uncertainty "There have been two votes, and we're pleased with the results of the two votes." George W. Bush, on...
Pumping Iron, Digging Gold, Pressing Flesh: The Favorite Son: At a Time of Republican Desperation to Find Someone to Reclaim the Presidency, George W. Bush Received a Procession of Party Elders Who Quickly Rallied to His Candidacy. but the Early Primaries Were Not So Easy
It was April 1998, and George W. Bush was still not sure he was running for president. The old family loyalists and party elders were already talking about a restoration, and they were eager for an audience with the man who could deliver the country...
Score One for the Raider: Nader Won the Marginal Votes That Could Have Given Gore an Undisputed Victory in Florida
Now Al Gore knows what General Motors learned long ago: Ralph Nader doesn't like to be ignored. For months, Gore refused to even speak Nader's name. But in those final critical days, Nader endured daily attacks from Gore's surrogates, and he responded...
The Legal Road Ahead: Unless Bush or Gore Gives in, the Long Trail May Lead to the Steps of the Supreme Court
Depending on how you count them, there are now at least nine separate lawsuits fueling the postelection feud in Florida. Al Gore's legal team--seizing on the confusing Palm Beach County ballot that may have caused thousands of Gore supporters to accidentally...
The Longest Election Day: Americans Await an Outcome. but Only History Will Tell Them What Their Vote Really Meant
Early morning in the dining room of an elementary school, its tile walls hung with cardboard cutouts of pumpkins and Pilgrims, its air so inert that the faint suggestion of a thousand tuna sandwiches seems to float in the atmosphere like the ghosts...
The Night of Bad Calls: Why This Razor-Thin Election Confounded the Number Crunchers and the Networks
The party at NBC was just getting good. It was election night, and a group of executives were holding a bash in the "Saturday Night Live" studio. Jack Welch, chairman of General Electric, the network's parent company, decided it would be fun to lead...
What A Long, Strange Trip: The Inside Story: For More Than a Year, a Team on Newsweek Reporters Has Been Following the Candidates and Their Advisers, Gathering Confidential Information for This Now-It-Can-Be-Told Account of the Race between Al Gore and George W. Bush from Day One to the White-Knuckle Endgame
OVERTIME This was a campaign in which Election Day didn't mark the end of the race for George W. Bush and Al Gore, but rather the beginning of another lap-- which turned out to be the most extraordinary, exciting and grueling of all Battle After the...