Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 12

2001: Fool's Errands
What's on a fool's mind this year--besides a jingly jester's cap? Over Foosball games in our Alexandria, Va., offices, we debate pressing issues like how to unlock shareholder value, and add value for the customer and--oh, forget it. Here's what we...
An Atheist's Last Rites: Investigators Lay Madalyn O'Hair Case to Rest
Using shovels, trowels and dental picks, a team of investigators spent 20 hours excavating a shallow grave on a remote south Texas ranch. They found what they were looking for: the skeletons of two women and a man who had been murdered years before....
Building Blocks for Every Kid: The Science Says It All: Preschool Programs Are Neither a Luxury nor a Fad, but a Real Necessity
When my children were newborns and I was spending most of my time watching television while nursing, I saw a program with pediatrician extraordinaire T. Berry Brazelton in which he repeatedly stuck out his tongue at an infant on camera. The point of...
Can This Pill Stop You from Hitting the Bottle? Alcohol: Every Year, Abusive Drinking Costs the United States More Than All Illegal Drugs Combined. Now a Controversial Medicine That Fights the Craving for Booze May Help Alcoholics in Their Struggle to Stay Sober. but Is It a Magic Bullet?
Addicts know the pattern all too well--that roller-coaster ride of intoxicating highs and wasted lows. David Nott's journey has been one of the worst. At 28 he was a successful underwriter for Lloyds Insurance in London with a Porsche, a Ferrari and...
Clicks for Bricks: Tough Business: The Web Can't Raise Retail Margins. So Pick Firms with High Volume and Deep Pockets
Let's be honest: only rarely does consumer retailing set investors' pulses racing. It's an industry with slim profit margins, where even industry leaders win below-average valuation multiples from Wall Street. Take Sears, for example. The longtime...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Nautical Blasts From the Past Step back in time and onto the deck of an 18th-century warship for intense naval combat in Age of Sail II ($39.95; TalonSoft). An impressive PC game with amazing attention to detail, Sail II puts you...
Full Stem Ahead: Opportunity: From Artificial Bone to Stem Cells, Biotech Can Offer High Returns. It's Not for the Faint of Heart
Chances are, someday you will need replacement tissue. More than 150,000 people worldwide are waiting for an organ. Doctors perform 3 million cardiovascular procedures a year and 2.5 million bone and plastic reconstructive surgeries. At least 200,000...
How It All Starts Inside Your Brain: Science: New Research on How Cocaine, Heroin, Alcohol and Amphetamines Target Neuronal Circuits Is Revealing the Biological Basis of Addiction, Tolerance, Withdrawal and Relapse
One by one, each crack addict took his turn in the fMRI tube, its magnets pounding away with a throbbing bass. A mirror inside was angled just so, allowing the addict to see a screen just outside the tube. Then the 10-minute video rolled. For two minutes,...
Knock, Knock. Who's There? A Stylish 'Hannibal' Comes Calling, but Doesn't Deliver
Hannibal Lecter, being a connoisseur of fine wines, Renaissance art, and dapper Borsalino hats, would have liked the idea of Ridley Scott directing the long-awaited sequel to "The Silence of the Lambs." Scott, as we know from "Blade Runner" and "Gladiator,"...
Let's Not Get Carried Away: The Motley Fool Says: Investing Is More Than a Popularity Contest. Some Old Rules Still Apply
In the short run the market is a voting machine, but in the long run it is a weighing machine," the legendary investor Benjamin Graham used to say--long before events in Florida made "voting machine" the best fodder for late-night comics since "Lewinsky."...
Life of O'Reilly: He's Got the Highest Ratings in the Business and a New York Times Best Seller. So Why Does This Fox News Phenom Feel 'Misunderstood'
Bill O'Reilly makes more than a million dollars a year, but he's damned if he'll spend $3.50 on a cup of coffee. "I will not go in a Starbucks," he says. He prefers a coffee shop in Manhasset, Long Island, where cops and firemen hang out. Chatting...
Mail Call
Justice for All? Our cover story on John Ashcroft's nomination for attorney general elicited mixed reviews. Some letter writers applauded the nominee and defended his views. "I am excited that someone with Ashcroft's beliefs and character will stand...
Need to Talk? Doctor Monty Is Always in. Those Big Eyes! Those Soft Ears! Strangers Can't Help Seeing My Golden as a Four-Legged Invitation to Vent
A tiny, impeccably dressed woman I've never met before is crying. Crying and petting furiously. Monty, as usual, is swooning, eyes closed, all 80 pounds of him leaning so heavily into her hip I fear he might knock her down. She, meanwhile, is oblivious,...
New Ways to Stay Clean: Treatment: Beating an Addiction Is Tough, but Scientists Are Creating an Arsenal of Weapons, from Pills and Vaccines to Innovative Counseling
When Colin Martinez turned 43 a couple of years ago he was living under a bridge in Denver. By his count, he had devoted 31 years to getting wasted. "I smoked crack or freebased for 16 years," he says. "I injected heroin, injected cocaine, snorted...
Of God and Mammon: Bush Wants Believers to Do More Good Works. Will They Answer the Call?
Father Paul Hritz runs Malachi House, a string of renovated row houses for the dying poor on Cleveland's near West Side. On paper, Malachi House is exactly the sort of local social-service program President Bush wants the Feds to help by funding "faith-based"...
Periscope
PARDONS Scuffling in the Shadows of the Clinton Years It was a belated bid to wipe the slate clean. Last week Bill and Hillary Clinton offered to pay for nearly half the $190,000 in gifts they took with them and agreed to pick up a large part of the...
Perspectives
"I have no opinion. I had no opinion before. I had no opinion at the time. I have no opinion now." New York Sen. Hillary Clinton, on the furor surrounding Bill Clinton's presidential pardon of fugitive financier Marc Rich "The best thing for America...
Puffy's Fur Is Flying: The Embattled Entertainer's Clothing Line Hits Big
Sean (Puffy) Combs sweeps into the Seventh Avenue showroom of his clothing line, Sean John. Publicists hover. Designers, managers and executives vie for his attention. He's still wearing the pin-striped suit, gray silk tie and cufflinks--even the overcoat--he...
Rethinking Zero Tolerance: A Few Schools Are Inching Away from One-Strike Policies
When Joe Marchese arrived at the Westtown School, a private Quaker day and boarding school in a suburb of Philadelphia, he found a one-strike policy in effect toward drug and alcohol offenses: a kid caught with illegal substances was expelled. The...
Robert Downey Jr. Takes One Day at a Time: Hollywood: A Gifted Actor Who Can't Do Wrong On-Screen, Downey Jr. Can't Seem to Help Himself in Private. Is He Uniquely Self-Destructive or an Addict like Every Other?
Early in "The Last Party," Robert Downey Jr.'s 1993 documentary about the Clinton-Bush presidential contest, the actor gives a startling description of his own internal psychic face-off. "I call it the Good Boy and the Goat Boy," he says in a voice-over....
The Enemy Is Every One of Us: The Acclaimed Screenwriter of 'Traffic,' an Unflinching Inquiry into the War on Drugs, Learned His Material Firsthand
I started drinking young and hard in Louisville, Ky., a town known for its bourbon, cigarettes and horse racing. I grew up on the same block where Hunter S. Thompson had a generation before. I also wanted to be a writer, like my grandfather, who carried...
The Forecast: Mostly Sunny: In Demand: Mobile Communications Is a Young, Booming Industry, but Providers Took on Loads of Debt
If it's starting to seem as though mobile phones are part of the human physique, as inescapable as our eyes and ears, we have wireless service providers to thank. After all, they're the ones who run the networks over which we do mobile communications....
The Gospel According to John: A Criminologist's New Crusade to Invigorate Churches
John DiIulio has a lot to learn about Washington protocol. Last week at an event announcing the University of Pennsylvania political scientist's appointment as head of President Bush's new Office on Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, DiIulio, 42,...
The Last Victims: After 12 Years, the Pan Am 103 Terrorism Trial Finally Produced a Mixed Verdict. Long-Suffering Relatives of the Bombing's Victims Vowed to Fight on. but for Families like the Flannigans, It Is Too Late for Justice
No one had more reason to remember the night of Dec. 21, 1988, than Steven Flannigan. Christmas was only four days away, so Steve, then 14, had slipped next door with a present for his 10-year-old sister, Joanne. It was a new bike, and he wanted to...
The War on Addiction: Abuse in America: Fresh Research and Shifting Views of Treatment Are Opening New Fronts in a Deadly Struggle
Maybe you've seen the movie: Dad, an Ohio judge and the nation's new drug czar, needs a cocktail to "take the edge off." Mom has her own youthful history with drugs and scoffs at Dad's suggestion that she was just "experimenting." Their 16-year-old...
The War on Drugs Goes to the Air: Know Who Makes All Those Anti-Drug Spots? Doesn't Matter: They Work
Anybody who's turned on a television in the past 14 years has seen the work of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America. Remember these? A girl jackknifes off a diving board into an empty pool. Another bashes a kitchen to smithereens with a cast-iron...
Wandering in the Wilderness: Bush's Deft Bid to Co-Opt the Middle Has Democrats Adrift
It was the first movie night in the new Bush White House, and the guest of honor had already been there once that day. After his final floor speech last Thursday opposing John Ashcroft's nomination as attorney general, Sen. Ted Kennedy joined the president...
What We Learn from the 1920s: The Economy Then Looked a Lot like the Economy Now. but There Are Some Critical Differences
It may be a sign of the times that a 10th-grade history teacher recently assigned the following essay topic: What caused the Great Depression, and how do economic conditions then (the 1920s) and now compare? I know because a desperate mother--a friend--called...
Why One Defendant Got Off: Did the CIA and FBI Botch the Case?
Abdul Majid Giakawas expected to be a star witness when the Lockerbie trial began last spring. An ex-Libyan intelligence officer and a CIA informant, Giaka claimed to know of the two defendants' access to explosives. He said he had seen them handling...