Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 13

A Treasure by the Baltic: Tallinn, Estonia's Capital, Combines New and Old
Byline: Stryker McGuire Tallinn--where's that? you figure you probably don't want to go there. Think again. The capital of Estonia, a former corner of the Soviet Union on the Baltic Sea, still qualifies as undiscovered. But it's beginning to get...
A Year of African Life Opened My Eyes: The Simple, Slow Pace of Tanzania Helped Me See What I Needed to Do: Quit My Job and Start Over
Byline: Joann Hornak Anyone who has considered following a dream career is often told by well-meaning family and friends, "Don't quit your day job." I didn't listen. Three years ago, while I was working as a prosecuting attorney, I took a year's...
Big Biz-After Gym: Case Study: How New Hampshire Teens Learned to Reinvent Their Game Company
Byline: Scott Kirsner Two years ago David Bell convened the meeting that would determine whether his start-up company, Chasma Inc. of Nashua, N.H., would survive. Bell had blown through a quarter-million dollars of funding that year. His employees...
Divorce, L.A. Style: The San Fernando Valley Wants to Secede from Los Angeles. Can This Marriage Be Saved?
Byline: Andrew Murr The San Fernando Valley was long America's iconic suburb. Starting with GIs who flocked to new tract homes after the second world war, the vast stretch of Los Angeles north of the Hollywood Hills was both a part of the city and...
Doing Nothing Is Something: The Overscheduled Children of 21st-Century America, Deprived of the Gift of Boredom
Byline: Anna Quindlen Summer is coming soon. I can feel it in the softening of the air, but I can see it, too, in the textbooks on my children's desks. The number of uncut pages at the back grows smaller and smaller. The loose-leaf is ragged at...
Father Fixit: Since the Scandal Began, 177 Priests Have Been Removed from Their Posts. Who Tends the Flock?
Byline: Daniel McGinn After weeks of revelations about priest abuse and church cover-ups, Father James Flavin didn't expect good news when he opened The Boston Globe one February morning. But he was unprepared for a story that brought the scandal...
Homeland: Can Card Save the Incredible Shrinking Czar? White House Will Review the Homeland-Security Office
Byline: Tamara Lipper and Michael Isikoff Emphasizing that he wanted the entire U.S. government mobilized to prevent future attacks, President George W. Bush after September 11 created a new White House office to ride herd on federal agencies, and...
Is That You in Aisle 6? Wireless: GPS Refinements Could Redefine Mobile Networks and the Utility of Your Cell Phone
Byline: Brad Stone The interior stairwell in most office buildings is a no man's land, meant only for escaping fires. But for Michael Kim, it provides the ideal setting to show off his new product to visitors. Kim is the president of the South San...
It's Pure, but Not Simple: A Newly Discovered 'Novel' Isn't Quite What It Seems
Byline: David Gates For a while now, I've been finding current fiction hard to read: airlessly competent, relentlessly put-together, overthought. The literary equivalents of click tracks and tuners regularize the tempos of plots and smooth out the...
Kids Take the Plunge: Scuba Can Be Great on a Family Vacation, but Beginning at Which Age?
Byline: Debra A. Klein Though she applied sunscreen on a Belize family dive trip, Susan Keller was still burning up. There she was on the beach playing sitter to her kids, while the rest of the adults were exploring the depths of the Caribbean....
Lust and Consequences: Adrian Lyne's Steamy Exploration of Infidelity
Byline: David Ansen Diane Lane, long one of Hollywood's most underrated talents, gives a stunning, star-making performance in Adrian Lyne's "Unfaithful." She plays Connie Sumner, a wealthy, happily married suburban mom who impulsively hurls herself...
Memo to CEOs: Bigger Isn't Better: The Urge to Merge-And Acquire, and Grow, and Grow Some More-Is a Powerful Force in Business. It's a Rare Chief Executive Who Can Fight It
Byline: Allan Sloan If companies ever learn from their mistakes, people like me will be out of business. Luckily, there seems to be no chance of that happening, despite object lessons all around us. Take, for instance, the corporate idea that bigger...
Mideast: Schmoozing Ahead: Face Time with Bush Is Critical; It's All in the Eye Thing. How the Siege Ended-And What's Left to Do
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Roy Gutman The last time Yasir Arafat shook the hand of Colin Powell, the Palestinian leader played the moment for all the desperate drama he could. Arafat was under siege in his shell-shattered, sewage-stinking compound...
Newsmakers
Byline: Devin Gordon, Jonathan Alter and Lorraine Ali Bill Clinton wants to be the next Oprah? When it comes to our 42d president, almost anything seems plausible. Just not this. It's time to separate fact from fiction about Clinton's meeting last...
Out of the Dot-Coma: Global Business: In Good Times and Bad, Sweden Is Europe's Best Measure of the Health of the Technology Industry. Lately, Things Are Looking Up
Byline: Stryker McGuire Once upon a time, baby-faced Jonas Svensson was a leading symbol of Sweden's new generation of information-technology entrepreneurs. He and a handful of other twentysomethings founded Spray, the hot Internet portal that,...
Paint by Numbers: Thomas Kinkade's Dreamy Paintings Remain Wildly Popular, but His Business Plan Needs Touching Up
Byline: Karen Breslau Nobody can accuse Thomas Kinkade of thinking small. The "Painter of Light," as he calls himself, has long dreamed of putting his bucolic works of sun-splashed cottages, twinkling lanterns and luminous gardens "in every home...
Pakistan: Secret Hunt, Elusive Prey: In Search of Bin Laden, Special Ops Teams Are Raiding Pakistan's Tribal Areas. A Report from the Front
Byline: Rod Nordland and Scott Johnson Something very secret is happening in the mountains above Miram Shah. Until a few months ago, this forsaken corner of Pakistan's Northwest Frontier Province was effectively off-limits to the Islamabad government's...
Paying Up for Quality Care: You May Have to Do Just That, as Companies Shift More of Their Medical Costs to Employees
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Get ready for the next scary change in your company health insurance. Employers have squeezed almost all the costs they can from managed care. Now they're working on ways to pass consumers the ball--and the bill. You'll...
Perspectives
"The more destruction I see, the stronger I get." Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat, 34 days after his imprisonment, on the wreckage Israeli troops left in Ramallah "The whole campus is worried." SiTanka Huron University freshman Tim Emerson, referring...
Playing the ID Card: Americans Have Never Had to 'Show Papers' to Move around. Now They Must Choose between Privacy and Security
Byline: Steven Levy When Hani Hanjour and Khalid Almihdhar pulled their van into a 7-Eleven parking lot last Aug. 1, they weren't looking for Slurpees. Apparently they knew that the Falls Church, Va., location was a hangout for day laborers, and...
Remembering the Heroes: Europe's WWII Battlefields Draw a New Generation
Byline: William Underhill It's late afternoon, and the gates of the U.S. military cemetery in tiny Luxembourg should soon be closing. But superintendent Leland Atkinson is reluctant to call it a day. The 50-acre site is still busy with visitors....
Size Matters: Small Is Good: Web Visions: Small Firms Contact Customers. Big Ones Use It for Mass Marketing
Byline: Erik Sherman When tourism fell victim to the terrorism of September 11, Palm Springs, Calif., took the hit, too. The tony desert resort saw an overall dip of nearly 10 percent in business through autumn of 2001, and expects business to be...
'Smile. Relax. Smile. Relax.': With Support from New Friends, Reporter Ana Figueroa Goes under the Needle at a 'Brows & Botox' Party in Beverly Hills
It all started innocently enough, with a trip to the dermatologist last year for a routine checkup. I had heard a lot about Botox, and confessed my curiosity to the doctor. He assured me the injections would take only a second, and just a few moments...
Songs in the Key of Strife: Hill Comes Unplugged
Byline: Jeff Giles Lauryn Hill has been to the edge, and lived to talk about it. And talk about it. And talk about it. Her new live album, her first offering in four years, isn't quite two hours long, and nearly 30 minutes of it is devoted to intense,...
The Botox Boom: The Drug That's Smoothed a Million Brows Is Coming Soon to a Doctor's Office near You
Byline: David Noonan and Jerry Adler Someday the world of science may recognize the contribution of Cathy Bickerton Swann, perhaps the only person to make medical history as a receptionist in a dermatologist's office. It was back in 1987 when Dr....
The Queen Mother: For Years Barbara Bush Took Pains to Project a Benign, Maternal Persona. Those Days Are Over
Byline: Martha Brant and Weston Kosova Mother's Day is coming, and if you know what's good for you the Hallmark card is already in the mail. That is, unless your mother is Barbara Bush. The First Family has an unusual way of celebrating the hallowed...
This Case Won't Die: Fresh Evidence Fuels a 50-Year Fight to Prove That Dr. Sam Sheppard Was Not the One Who Killed His Wife
Byline: Debra Rosenberg It's a murder mystery that's gripped the nation for nearly 50 years, rising to cult status through movies and "The Fugitive" television series. In real life, there was no "one-armed man," but a dark, bushy-haired intruder,...
Travel Briefs: Read Up on Dengue Fever, Hotel Lawsuits, and Shark Attacks
Byline: Debra A. Klein Mosquitoes Dengue Alert If you think you'll get dengue fever only on a swashbuckling Amazonian expedition, you should pack the DEET before your next beach trip to the South Pacific. From French Polynesia to Maui, mosquito-transmitted...
Turning off the Music Tap: Is Music Piracy So Ingrained That Only Draconian Legislation Can Stop It-Or Is There a Better Way to Make Sure Artists Get Their Money?
Byline: Steven Levy Has the Internet bred a generation of music pirates? That's the implicit assumption of the record labels, which insist that their survival depends on imposing lockouts on both hardware and software that would limit your ability...
Usher in a New Era: The Sweet-Faced R&B Star Might Just Be the One to Save Arista Records
Byline: Allison Samuels As 10,000 mourners gathered in a cavernous televangelist church in suburban Atlanta last Thursday to pay their last respects to TLC's Lisa (Left Eye) Lopes, Arista Records chief L. A. Reid was left to ponder what would become...
Voices of the Children: "We Beat and Killed People.": Leaders Gather at the U.N. This Week to Discuss the World's Kids, Including Child Soldiers. NEWSWEEK Went to Sierra Leone to Talk in Depth with Four Real Experts
Byline: Tom Masland The four boys at St. Francis Primary School don't stand out much. They're just a bit bigger than other fourth and fifth graders crowded onto rough benches in the otherwise bare classrooms. And teachers at St. Francis say the...
Web Attack in the Workplace: Security: Protecting PC Networks from Internet Invaders Has Never Been More Vital for Small Business
Byline: Emily Benedek Last year the network at Beauty Fashion magazine, a small trade publication in New York, was simultaneously infected by two viruses: Code Red and Nimda. The attack destroyed all the computers' files and shut down Internet access...
What's Killing the Frogs? Scientists Are Finding That Even Low Levels of Pollutants Can Harm Amphibians-And Possibly People
Byline: Fred Guterl As a boy, Gary Fellers spent summers chasing after frogs in the lakes and ponds of Yosemite National Park. He even kept a field notebook, just like naturalists in the early 20th century who described mountain yellow-legged frogs...
What the Revolution Was For: The Generations Are at War in Newark's Mayoral Race, as a Civil-Rights Veteran Fends off a Beneficiary of the Movement's Fruits
Byline: Ellis Cose The comparison to Bill Clinton comes easily--not just to the media, but to Cory Booker himself. A fellow graduate of Yale Law, a Rhodes scholar, policy wonk and charmer, Booker has seduced America's glitter people. The celebrities...