Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 30

A New Kind of Race: Minority Candidates Were Once Confined to the 'Ethnic Ghetto.' These Days, They Are Reaching Far Beyond
Byline: Ellis Cose He takes it as a given that demography is destiny; and in the movie in his mind this particular truth has a sound. It is the roar of a mighty river that once was a shallow stream. For Roberto Ramirez, former Bronx Democratic chief,...
A Requiem from a Heavyweight
Byline: --David Gates When music addresses a catastrophe like the September 11 attacks, how can you tell heart-tugging kitsch from the real deal? John Adams's "On the Transmigration of Souls," which had its world premiere with the New York Philharmonic...
A Safe Haven? Focusing on a Fundamentalist Strain of Islam, Investigators Are Searching American Mosques for Signs of Support for Terror. It's a Delicate Balancing Act
Byline: Sarah Downey and Michael Hirsh When Zacarias Moussaoui arrived in Norman, Okla., to take flight lessons, one of his first stops was the white gated mosque just down the street from the university campus. Mosque members Hussein Al-Attas and...
A Tale of Two Hogs: THE OTHER WHITE MEAT: This Little Piggy Ate Organic Feed and This Little Piggy Had None. How a Couple of Iowa Farmers Try to Make a Living
Byline: Jerry Adler The pork board keeps reminding Americans how lean pork is, and if you don't believe it, you should look at some pigs. An obvious place to begin is in northeastern Iowa, where a farmer named Gary Lynch keeps 100,000 or so hogs...
A Writer's Fall from Grace: A Teen Sex Scandal Fells a Famous Chicago Scribe
Byline: Seth Mnookin The front-page editor's note was terse. "Chicago Tribune columnist Bob Greene has resigned and will no longer appear in the pages of the newspaper," began the statement signed by Ann Marie Lipinski, a woman who has been in the...
Certified Organic: Stamp of Approval: New Government Rules Will Define 'Organic.' the Sale of These Fruits, Veggies and Snack Foods Has Soared, but We Still Aren't Sure What Good They Do. Here's a Guide to How Purer Products Affect the Health of Our Families and the Planet
Publisher correction: Nov 13 2002 In "Certified Organic" (Sept. 30), we should have said the girl pictured is named Nicole Mikshowsky. _________________________ Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Otto Kramm used to come home from work at night and warn...
Don't Blame It All on Steve Case
Byline: Allan Sloan Call it Schadenfreude or celebrity CEO smackdown. But if you like watching icons fall, you're having tons of fun these days: Jack Welch of General Electric, Dennis Kozlowski of Tyco, Bernie Ebbers of WorldCom, Martha Stewart,...
Etchings and Then Posters
Byline: George F. Will President Theodore Roosevelt explained how he helped his secretary of war, William Howard Taft, campaign to succeed him: "I told him he must treat the political audience as one coming, not to see an etching, but a poster."...
Exclusive: Why the White House Said Yes to a 9-11 Inquiry
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Daniel Klaidman President Bush's decision to agree to an independent panel to investigate the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks could lead to the most far-reaching and explosive government inquiry in decades. It...
Forget the Fads-The Old Way Works Best: What Will Fix Public Education? A Teacher, a Chalkboard and a Roomful of Willing Students
Byline: Evan Keliher I've never claimed to have psychic powers, but I did predict that the $500 million that philanthropist Walter Annenberg poured into various school systems around the country, beginning in 1993, would fail to make any difference...
In the Boonies, an Oasis of Success: Entrepreneurs: In Upstate New York, a Legendary Incubator of New Companies Thrives after the Dot-Com Bust. the Old Economy Isn't So Bad after All
Byline: Daniel McGinn At the height of the internet boom, Tom Mancuso kept hearing from investors who wanted to pick his brain. If Mancuso were a Silicon Valley venture capitalist, that might've been unremarkable. But Mancuso manages a huge industrial...
Iraq: It's the Oil, Stupid
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Ok, pessimists, gather round. I've a story to tell that you won't ordinarily hear--about Iraq, the Middle East and oil. Maybe it's just a fairy tale, but maybe not. If not, this Iraqi affair isn't just about Saddam. We...
Is the Boss Watching? Online: Call It Orwellian or a Model for Productivity, but Software That Allows Companies to Monitor Their Employees' Web Surfing Is a Burgeoning Business
Byline: Brad Stone Does Phyllis Rhodes have an Internet affliction? A mortgage salesperson from Summit, N.J., she freely admits to shopping for auction deals on eBay, sending her friends e-mail from her Hotmail account and perusing the latest nightlife...
It's Back to School for Zadie Smith: Honest. Her Second Novel May Be Her Last-For Now
Byline: Malcolm Jones Zadie Smith is thinking seriously about hanging it up. Never mind that at 26 she's published two novels in two years, starting with the best-selling "White Teeth," which copped pretty much every first-novel prize in sight,...
Meet the Khat-Heads: In East Africa, It's a Harmless Stimulant. in America, It's an Illegal Drug. Chewing through Culture Shock in the Midwest
Byline: T. Trent Gegax High above Minneapolis, the prefab-concrete Cedar-Riverside towers are crowded with newly arrived East African immigrants. Yemenis and Somalis spend weekends in the subsidized high-rises chewing over homeland politics--and...
Miami Heat: Forget 'Law & Order.' Now That 'CSI' Is TV's Top Drama, It's Starting a New Crime Wave
Byline: Marc Peyser Whoever coined the phrase "hotter than hell" must have visited the Everglades in July. It's about 96 degrees on this oppressive morning, with 110 percent humidity because some sadistic guys are walking around pumping extra moisture...
Newsmakers
Byline: Peg Tyre Vanessa Juarez Rosie Disposition Last week, when Rosie O'Donnell pulled the plug on Rosie, complaining the magazine no longer represented her "vision and ideas," it should have surprised no one. There were problems from the start....
New York: Get off the Ride
Byline: Steve Fries On New York Skyride, a virtual aerial tour of the city that tourists can take at the Empire State Building, riders feel like they're peering out of the front of a spaceship as they fly above and around Big Apple landmarks. But...
'Nobody Is Safe': On a Nuclear Fault Line, Trapped between Islamic Militants and Indian Soldiers, the Kashmiris Have an Election but Hardly Any Choice about Their Own Future
Byline: Jeffrey Bartholet The Indian soldier, in full battle gear and armed with an AK-47, seems only mildly embarrassed. He's herding a dozen men and women down a narrow road in Indian-ruled Kashmir. "Nobody has voted, so we've got an order to...
Operating on Accuracy: Medical Dramas Turn to Experts to Teach Actors the Difference between Arrhythmia and Arteriosclerosis
Byline: Claudia Kalb It's a Thursday morning on the set of "ER" and actress Alex Kingston (Dr. Elizabeth Corday) is tripping over her lines. "I need 30 'migs' per kilo of methylprednisolone," she says, rushing to a gunshot victim. "Entry wound left...
Perspectives
"American officials have been fabricating false stories." Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, in a letter to the United Nations General Assembly, on President George W. Bush's U.N. speech "You're standing in front of the most self-involved audience...
Securing America, One Invention at a Time
Byline: Peg Tyre It was a convention that James Bond would love. Last week, 300 exhibitors attended a tech expo in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the Office of Homeland Security to show off the very latest in civil defense. Corporate giants like...
Sharp Words from Iran: Iran's Foreign Minister Talks about His Government's Evolving View of Saddam Hussein, Yasir Arafat and George Bush
Byline: Lally Weymouth Is Iran still in the "Axis of Evil" with North Korea and Iraq? Or could it be an ally in a future war against Saddam Hussein? In an exclusive interview, NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth grilled Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Our chief medical writer, Geoffrey Cowley, gets a lot of grief about his obsession with healthy eating. At home, his son makes fun of his big salads and sparse desserts, and dreams of a refrigerator filled with sodas. At work,...
The Fog of Battle: Bush's Diplomatic Offensive Is Well Underway. but Talk Is Cheap, and War Is Not. Evaluating the Military Options
Byline: John Barry and Evan Thomas It was, in sheer scale, "the greatest cavalry charge in American history," wrote one military historian. The four-day, 250-mile sprint of the 24th Mechanized Division around the western flank of Saddam Hussein's...
The Hunt for Sleeper Cells: Is Attending a Qaeda Training Camp a Crime? A Case Study in Buffalo Shows the New Realities of Fighting the Specter of Terror at Home
Byline: Mark Miller and Mark Hosenball Criminal bail hearings in federal court can sometimes stretch on for hours. The lawyers bicker about how much money the accused should pay to go free until trial, and the judge prolongs the proceedings with...
The Lonesome Doves of Europe
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Two events have set the course of the Iraq crisis so far: President George W. Bush's speech to the United Nations and Iraq's letter apparently allowing the weapons inspectors back in. The third will take place on Tuesday,...
The Nerds of Weather: Where Does Your 'Local' AccuWeather Forecast Come from? A Little Building in Rural Pennsylvania
Byline: Fred Guterl The sun is just poking over the hills of central Pennsylvania. The cars in the parking lot are thick with dew. For hours now, Elliot Abrams, the chief meteorologist at AccuWeather, has been sitting in his cramped, windowless...
The Perk Wars: As Jack Welch's Retirement Deal Sparks an Investor Backlash, Perks Could Become the New Stock Options
Byline: Keith Naughton More accustomed to being praised than pilloried, Jack Welch tried to make the uproar over his perks-for-life retirement deal go away last week. When his wife's divorce papers this month laid bare the lavish lifestyle General...
Time for an Instant Fix: America Online Long Ago Promised That Its Popular Instant-Messaging Software Would Work with Other IM Programs. We're Still Waiting
Byline: Steven Levy God knows that America Online has enough problems. There's that funny accounting business, its inability to meet ad quotas and all the untidy blame-mongering that follows the purchase of an elite media goliath by an overvalued...
Travel: The New Rules of Flying
Byline: Kevin Peraino Pity the poor baggage handlers at Alaska Airlines. Luggage at the nation's ninth largest carrier has been known to include smelly boxes of halibut, bulky kayaks and gory moose-head hunting trophies. But not everyone is grossed...
Weight Loss for Road Warriors: Travel: Think about It. Do You Really Need a Laptop When You Leave the Office? Smaller and Lighter Are Better
Byline: Erik Sherman I lost 20 pounds on the Cozumel high-tech diet. On a trip to Singapore last year, I packed a laptop, an SLR camera with multiple lenses and an e-mail device with a built-in international phone--which didn't even work. I learned...