Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 18

Absolut on the Rocks: It Used to Be the King of Cool. but New Brands Are Winning over Upscale Drinkers, Including James Bond
Byline: Keith Naughton For the past few years, Teresa Duke ordered her martinis with Absolut vodka and plenty of olive juice to make them "dirty." "I like them so dirty they're almost kinky," says the 38-year-old physician's assistant from Cleveland....
A Fed for the Church: The Vatican Rejected Zero Tolerance. Can a Former FBI Official Enforce a Compromise Plan on Sex Abuse?
Byline: Peg Tyre and Julie Scelfo When Roman Catholic activist Peter Isely found out last week that his church's proposed plan for dealing with sex abuse by priests could give bishops complete oversight of investigations, and will involve secret...
Another Go at the Tablet PC: Since a Tablet Costs $300 to $500 More Than a Comparable Laptop, Buyers Will Naturally Ask Whether They Really Need to Scribble on Their PCs
Byline: Steven Levy Experience the evolution. That's the weirdly appropriate slogan for Microsoft's highly touted tonic for the troubled computer industry, the Tablet PC. During its high-profile launch last Thursday, Bill Gates acknowledged that...
A Quilting Bee Bounty: The Work of Women from One Rural Town Matches the Masters of Abstraction
Byline: Peter Plagens America is a nation of quilters--20 million of them, in fact, which is probably more than the number of people who go to see exhibitions of modern art in museums. But quilters and modern-art fans need not be mutually exclusive...
Are We There Yet? Airports Have to Meet Tougher Standards for Checking Baggage This Holiday Season. Get Ready for a Big Mess
Byline: Kevin Peraino Deep below the bright and polished concourse at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, there exists a place that few travelers ever choose to visit. Conveyor belts thunder overhead as workers in coveralls heave suitcases into...
A Smooth Takeoff: Critics Have Blasted the Transportation Security Administration from Day One. Why They're Wrong
Byline: Steven Brill At 2:30 a.m. last April 30, Gail Rossides arrived at the concourse in front of Pier A at the Baltimore Washington airport. Except for the hour and her ebullient smile, Rossides--47, blond, dressed in a pantsuit--looked like...
Beat-the-Ball Tax Tips
Byline: Linda Stern Now that Republicans control the House and Senate, President George W. Bush's chances of making his tax cuts permanent have improved. But you can cut your own taxes with a few year-end moves. Here's what tax experts say you should...
Beware the Hair Soup: Los Angeles Diners Love Their Restaurant Rating System
Byline: David J. Jefferson and Tara Weingarten Never mind the Zagat guide. In the town that invented "doing lunch," gourmands can spot a hot restaurant simply by looking at the front door. No, Angelenos don't have more discriminating palates than...
Dell's New Toy: The Largest Maker of PCs in the World Bets on Getting Bigger by Going Smaller with a New Personal Organizer. and Dude, There Are More Changes to Come
Byline: Brad Stone It's the ultimate challenge for the financial analysts tapped to cover the Round Rock, Texas-based Dell Computer Corp. Twice a year, at a cocktail party on the night before the biannual Dell Analyst Meeting, Wall Street's number...
Dems in the Dumps: They Were Outmaneuvered, Outhustled and Overmatched. Can the Democrats Matter Again? A New Prescription for a Troubled Party
Byline: Jonathan Alter Memo To: The Democratic Party RE: Your mess From: Jonathan Alter Hello? Anyone home? I'm not quite sure to whom I should address this, considering that you have no leadership right now. Nancy Pelosi? Tom Daschle?...
Exclusive: Behind the Bushies' U.N. Victory
Byline: John Barry and Michael Hirsh As he walked his younger daughter Anne Marie down the aisle for her wedding on Nov. 2, Secretary of State Colin Powell had a double reason to rejoice. Even as the bridal party drove to the church in rural Maryland,...
Exhibits: Terrible, Beautiful
Byline: --Malcolm Jones Founded in 1863 as part of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the Mutter Museum was created as an educational service for practicing physicians. Its enormous collection of bottled fetuses, skulls, wax replicas of...
First Person: Better Think before You Apply: Early Decision Isn't for Everyone. A Student's Take on the Admissions Game
Byline: Ben Adler When I applied under Early Decision to the University of Pennsylvania four years ago, I was motivated by two powerful emotions: ambition and fear. The ambition was to fulfill my lifelong expectation of attending an Ivy League school;...
How Bush Did It: In a Historic Win, Dubya Defied the Experts Once Again. Behind the GOP's Early Planning and Product-Testing in a Wartime Race
Byline: Howard Fineman Election Day dawned in excellent fashion for a president leading a war on world terror and a political campaign for control of Congress. Thanks to a well-timed leak from the Pentagon, the morning newspapers featured what amounted...
Meet Mrs. Robinson: Lorraine Bracco's the Latest 'Soprano' to Try Broadway
Byline: Marc Peyser Looking for an extra fix of "The Sopranos"? This fall, the cast is all over the New York theater: Edie Falco ("Frankie and Johnny"), Jamie-Lynn Sigler ("Beauty and the Beast"), John Ventimiglia and Dominic Chianese ("The Resistible...
Mild about 'Harry': 'Chamber of Secrets' Is Finally Here: Our Precocious Hogwarts Wizards Are Bursting with Confidence, but the New Film Has More Monsters and Mayhem Than Magic
Byline: David Ansen Chris Columbus's "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" may have made many hundreds of millions of dollars, but only kids seemed to be genuinely enthusiastic about it. (A lot of kids, to be sure.) Grown-ups, who were equally...
Newsmakers
Byline: Ana Figueroa, David J. Jefferson Her Day In Court There were months of fulminations about how Winona Ryder was the victim of a celebrity witch hunt--most of it from her lawyer, Mark Geragos. There were days of intense scrutiny of the...
No Such Thing as a Free Check: It's the Hottest Trend in Banking. Can You Guess Why Financial Companies Love Free Checking? Hint: Overdraft Fees a Loan Shark Would Envy
Byline: Allan Sloan If you've ever wondered whether there really is such a thing as a free lunch, you'll be delighted to learn that the hottest trend in retail banking these days is "totally free" checking accounts. They require no minimum balance...
On the Edge in Turkey: Recep Tayyip Erdogan Insists That His Once Hard-Line Islamic Party Is Committed to Democracy. the West Prays It's True
Byline: Lally Weymouth Elections in staunchly secular Turkey last week delivered an overwhelming victory to the Islamic-rooted Justice and Development Party. But the party's chairman, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, formerly a member of the radical Islamic...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: New York Times, Associated Press, The Washington Post, ABCnews.Com, Associated Press, CNN, The Washington Post, New York Times, Fox News, Reuters, Associated Press "Conflict is not inevitable,...
Songs in the Key of TLC: They're the Most Successful Girl Group of All Time. Six Months after Lisa Lopes's Tragic Death, There's a New Album and Her Voice Still Haunts Many of the Tracks. but for the Two Survivors, What's Next?
Byline: Lorraine Ali An army of 1,500 fans have blocked traffic in New York's already-jammed Times Square. The crowd, many of whom wear a painted black line under their left eye, don't seem to mind the incessant honking and dirty looks from cabdrivers....
Talking a Stranger through the Night: When I Picked Up the Phone, I Didn't Realize I'd Be Helping Myself as Much as My Suicidal Caller
Byline: Sherry Amatenstein The call came 60 minutes into my third shift as a volunteer at the crisis hot line. As the child of Holocaust survivors, I grew up wanting to ease other people's pain. But it wasn't until after September 11 that I contacted...
The Aftermath: It's the Terror, Stupid: September 11 Transformed the Electoral Landscape. Only One Party Seemed to Get That. the New Politics of War
Byline: David Brooks Consumer confidence is at its lowest level in nine years. The economy has been in the doldrums his entire term. And yet on midterm Election Day, the president and his party triumphed. One thing is for sure. This election was...
The Early Decision Rebellion: Yale and Stanford Are Eliminating a Controversial Admissions Policy, but the Competitive Pressure Is Still on for Students Who Want to Get into Elite Schools
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz Rance Barber, a 17-year-old senior at New Trier High School on Chicago's North Shore, seems like a perfect candidate to apply to Stanford University through its Early Decision program. Both parents are enthusiastic alumni...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker George W. Bush was doing his best to charm us. It was the summer of 1999, and a group of NEWSWEEK editors had flown to Austin, Texas, to interview the governor about his expected presidential bid. Over a Tex-Mex lunch, Bush...
The (New) Sick Man of Europe: It's Germany. and All Its Problems, Including Onerous Labor Laws, High Wages and Slow Growth-Are Weighing Heavily on the World Economy
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson If there's a threat of dangerous deflation--a general fall in prices--the causes lie as much in Europe and Japan as in the United States. The inevitable collapse of America's speculative boom need not have been especially...
THE ONION: Area Man Doing Fine
Byline: Susannah Meadows When The Onion moved from Madison, Wis., to New York City a few years ago, fans of the paper feared its distinct humor would be tainted by the mainstream. Now the satirical weekly's distributed in five cities, its circulation...
The Opening Shot: In a Show of Superpower Might, the CIA Kills a Qaeda Operative in Yemen and His American Ally. Questions Remain, but One Thing's Certain: It Won't Be the Last Hit
Byline: Evan Thomas and Mark Hosenball The blast left little more than body parts and an oil stain in the desert. At first, word spread that the black all-terrain vehicle carrying a half-dozen Qaeda operatives had been blown up by a car bomb. Nothing...
The Real Motown Sound: The Unsung Funk Brothers Put the Heat into the Hits
Byline: David Ansen You didn't know that you wanted to see a movie about the Funk Brothers, but, believe me, you do. You've probably never heard of the Funk Brothers, and neither had I. But anybody who loves Motown (and who in his right mind doesn't?)...
The Tough Critics Speak: More Than 'Sorcerer's Stone,' the Sequel Thrills Children
Byline: Mary Carmichael Is the new Harry Potter movie better than the first one? When Harry hugs Hermione in the preview, is it the start of something icky, like flirting? And why is Dobby the House Elf so ugly? These are the questions occupying...
The Voices That Nobody Heard: Many Agreed Something Needed Protesting. They Did Not Agree on What That Might Be
Byline: Ellis Cose Before September 2001, Lochinvar was a myth, a heroic knight from the West--"so faithful in love... so dauntless in war"--who steals the damsel from an unworthy mate. But in the aftermath of Al Qaeda's attack, America craved its...
They're Rooting for America, Too: East Asians Worry That U.S. Foreign Policy Will Fail. Europeans Worry That It Will Succeed
Byline: Fareed Zakaria I was in Singapore when President Bush's twin successes, the midterm-election results and the United Nations resolution, filled the television news, and I asked a veteran diplomat the conventional question: was he worried...
Trouble: Dishing Up A Pyramid Scheme?
Byline: --Karen Breslau with Tom Nadeau What started as a parlor game among wealthy suburbanites may be the largest all-female fraud ring in California history. Leaders of Women Helping Women, a Sacramento "gifting club," were arraigned last week...
Watch the Paint Dry! the Man Behind HGTV and the Food Network Knows What America's Homebodies Really Want to Watch. His Big Secret: Stress-Free Shows. Call Him the Anti-Martha
Byline: Peg Tyre Most Saturday nights Jeanne Taylor Hard likes to unwind in front of the TV. Her channel of choice: Home & Garden Television, or HGTV, the network that has turned remodeling into spectator sport. For the next two hours, she'll...
Where Do We Go from Here?
Byline: Anna Quindlen I am pleased and proud to live in the people's republic of the Upper West Side, a Manhattan neighborhood so historically liberal that one day I arrived at the supermarket to find a fierce young woman handing out leaflets on...