Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 13

Angry at the Yanks: Strange Times for U.S. Troops Helping to Defend South Korea
Byline: George Wehrfritz Like thousands of U.S. troops stationed in South Korea, Lt. John Stone opted to live among the locals. After landing in June, the airman and his wife rented an apartment near Osan Air Base, an hour's drive south of Seoul,...
Ford's New Muscles
Byline: Keith Naughton Bill Ford Jr. desperately needs a hit. As the car company his great-grandfather founded prepares for its 100th anniversary, things have rarely looked worse. Sales are skidding, profits are nonexistent and its reputation has...
Getting Rid of the Sex Police: Sodomy Laws Are Part of a Dark Tradition in This Nation. They Are Meant Only to Demonize and Marginalize a Class of Human Beings
Byline: Anna Quindlen Wedding announcements track American social history. Once they were the purview of the well-to-do, and the stereotypical division of roles was in the published details: the groom's work, the bride's gown. Point d'esprit, sweetheart...
HEALTH: New Year, New Breasts?
Byline: Karen Springen Renae Waestman, 27, had always wanted the perfect hourglass figure: she thought her small breasts didn't go well with her slender waist and ample hips. It's not that she wanted the bust of Pamela Anderson--Catherine Zeta-Jones's...
Justice: The Killer Inside Me: He's a Murderer. and a Model Inmate. Should Wilbert Rideau Go Free?
Byline: Seth Mnookin Lt. Col. Bruce LaFargue is walking a visitor around the interior perimeter of Lake Charles, Louisiana's Calcasieu Parish Jail. Most of the prisoners are black, most are young and most are shirtless, showing off chiseled abs...
Kim Is the Key Danger. Yes, North Korea Is a Basket Case. but Kim Has Put Everything He Has into His Military, and He Has the Capacity to Kill More People Than in Any Conflict since World War II
Byline: Michael Hirsh More American flags can be seen in North Korea than in most U.S. cities. Millions of them dot the roads of this desperately poor land. Why? Because Old Glory is printed on the sides of polyester food-aid bags that feed 6 million...
Method Man: After a Five-Year Absence, Daniel Day-Lewis Is an Oscar Contender Again, Thanks to a Brilliant, Brutal Performance in 'Gangs of New York'
Byline: Jeff Giles Daniel Day-Lewis leans forward. "Let me ask you something," he says. I lean backward. I have just seen him play Bill the Butcher in Martin Scorsese's "Gangs of New York," in which he looms over a would-be assassin and bellows,...
Military: The War on Iraq: Already Underway
Byline: Jonathan Alter Has the war in Iraq already started? It sure looks that way to U.S. pilots in the region. The Pentagon makes no secret of the fact that since the mid-1990s, the U.S. military has been bombing targets in southern Iraq. But...
Morality Is Not A Strategy: The Crisis Is Not That Kim Has Suddenly Become More Evil. It Is That North Korea Will, within Months, Become a Plutonium Factory
Byline: Fareed Zakaria President Bush is right about one thing--North Korea's Kim Jong Il is an evil man who runs one of the most barbaric regimes in the world, suppressing and starving its own people. In the back-and-forth of diplomacy around the...
Newsmakers
Byline: David Gates; Malcolm Jones F for Penmanship Of course there's nothing funny about drunken-driving charges, so it could have been Diana Ross's well-known sense of self-irony that made her fall down laughing, as Tucson, Ariz., police claim,...
... No, Saddam Is Worse: The Iraqi Dictator Has Proved That He Has Evil Intent, and No Compunction against Using the World's Most Deadly Weapons. He Cannot Be Given Another Chance
Byline: Christopher Dickey Saddam Hussein knows what he wants: Domination of the Arab world with all its oil. Elimination of Israel. Vengeance on the United States. His record is so clear on all these points that only those who refuse to see could...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: CNN, Transcript, CNN, Associated Press (2), CNN, The Washington Post, CNN, Associated Press, Reuters, E! Online "You are an empty shell. You are nothing." Brenda van Dam, speaking to...
Politics: The Dems' New Math: If Nobody's Got a Shot at Bush in 2004, Everybody Does
Byline: Howard Fineman His friends jokingly call it "The Shrine," and Sen. Tom Daschle wanted to visit it again before deciding--finally deciding--to run for president. The hallowed spot is in Aberdeen, S.D., in the basement of his mother's home...
Rem's Chinese Puzzle: Koolhaas Invents a 21st-Century Skyscraper for Beijing
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan In China, there's a race to construct the world's tallest building. Both the Shanghai World Financial Center (due by 2008) and Union Square in Hong Kong (to open in 2007) will top out at more than 1,500 feet into the clouds....
Spaced Out: A Group That Believes Life on Earth Was Created by Aliens Claims to Have Made the First Human Clone. Who Are the Raelians and Where Are They Hiding 'Eve'?
Byline: Jerry Adler Two thousand years ago a Judean carpenter changed the course of history by offering humanity a path to eternal life. About a week ago a French-born sometime journalist and race-car driver who calls himself Rael tried to do the...
Spinsterhood Is Powerful: 'The Bachelor' Gets a Sex Change and a Suffix. Trista Gets Her Pick of Mr. Rights. TV Gets Real
Byline: Marc Peyser Bad news, "Bachelor" fans. Reality TV's hottest dating show may not survive its sex-change operation. Not that ABC has shared even a minute of "The Bachelorette," which debuts this week. But talk to Trista Rehn, the former Miami...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Our Paris bureau chief, Christopher Dickey, has reported from war zones for more than two decades. He was on the front lines in Nicaragua in the 1980s, the gulf war in the '90s and Israel at the height of the suicide bombings...
The End of the Double Game: Did the Prophet Muhammad Ban Women from Sports? A NEWSWEEK Columnist Finds Odd Answers in Saudi Arabia
Byline: Jonathan Alter A recent column in a Saudi newspaper made a splash in Riyadh. The writer asked: why shouldn't women be able to play sports? (With other women, of course.) Where did the Prophet Muhammad say that women should not be able to...
The Fast and the Luxurious: Can an Outrageous $250,000 Cadillac with a V-16 Engine Make Detroit King of the Road Again? Bob Lutz Is Betting His Reputation on It
Byline: Keith Naughton Detroit isn't known for its fashion shows, but this past Sunday it hoped to create a buzz machine that even New York would envy. To set the stage for a big coming-out party at this week's auto show, General Motors spent nearly...
The Newspapers Tell Only Half of the Story: Americans Read about Acts of Racism Daily, but Most of Us Know Things Aren't Nearly So Bleak
Byline: Wes Carter Whenever I pick up a newspaper, I see articles about the dismal state of race relations in America, and I feel as if I have once again entered a long, dark tunnel where I'm surrounded by anguished faces and heavy hearts, and where...
The Okinawa Way: The Grandparents Live Past 100, but after Too Many Burgers, the Islands' Next Generation May Not Make It to Middle Age
Byline: Hideko Takayama Every morning Seiryu Toguchi rises at 6, washes his face and exercises in the lush front yard of his home in Okinawa. He prepares a breakfast of rice and miso soup with spinach and egg. Then he tends his nearby farm, where...
The Spirit of America: As a Society, We Seem to Adapt to Unexpected Change Better Than Most Others. Looking Forward, We May Find a Need for This Resilience
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We Americans, charter members of a get-with-it-now society, don't have much use for history. But we should. In this new year, we face momentous uncertainties: war (or wars), a weak economy. Although the past cannot foretell...
Who Is the Bigger Threat? Bush Has to Make His Case to an Increasingly Skeptical World, and Win Allies in the Process
Byline: Richard Wolffe George W. Bush did not just awaken to the menace of Kim Jong Il. Long before the North Korean dictator kicked out international inspectors, removed the monitoring seals and cameras from his nuclear plant at Yongbyon and threatened...
Women, Wine and Weapons: Kim's a Strange Movie Buff Who Loves the Gory 'Friday the 13th' Teen-Slasher Flicks. He Also Stars in His Own Real-Life Horror Show
Byline: Evan Thomas One of the tougher reviews for the new James Bond movie, "Die Another Day," came from an official-sounding organization, located in Pyongyang, North Korea, called the "Secretariat of the Committee for the Peaceful Reunification...