Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 23

A Groom's Watery Grave; How Did a Honeymooner Go Missing at Sea?
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores (With Sarah Childress) It was shaping up to be a perfect honeymoon for George Smith and Jennifer Hagel Smith. Touring the Mediterranean aboard a Royal Caribbean cruise ship last summer, the couple, both 26, were enthralled...
Al Qaeda: 'Got to Take That Shot'
Byline: Sami Yousafzai, Mark Hosenball and Zahid Hussain U.S. officials don't want to act rashly--especially in remote Pakistan, where American forces are not supposed to be operating. But, says former White House counterterror official Roger Cressey,...
A Power Outage on Capitol Hill
Byline: Jonathan Alter What if we faced a constitutional crisis and hardly anyone noticed? As he quietly mastered the tiresome cat-and-mouse game inside the Senate Judiciary Committee last week, Judge Samuel Alito gave few hints of where he stood...
Broadway on the Strip; the Latest Crapshoot in Vegas? Legitimate Musicals
Byline: Steve Friess When Harvey Fierstein announced he would reprise his Tony-winning "Hairspray" turn in--of all places--Las Vegas, it looked as if Sin City's dream of becoming Broadway West might come true. "Las Vegas could be like the old vaudeville...
Diplomacy and Force; Interview: The United Nations' Top Inspector Is Prepared to Issue a Report on Iran's Nuclear Program That Will 'Reverberate around the World.'
Byline: Christopher Dickey The man in the middle of the escalating tensions between Iran, Europe and the United States is Mohamed ElBaradei, director-general of the United Nations' International Atomic Energy Agency. ElBaradei and the IAEA, recipients...
Fashion: Coming to the Carpet
Byline: Allison Samuels Kevan Hall remembers watching the divas of his childhood parade across the TV screen while he sketched dresses for them. "We were a fashionable family--I have the pictures to prove it," says Hall, sitting in his West Hollywood...
Going for Broke; Sarah Hughes Remembers How She Went to Salt Lake City as a Long Shot, Only to Skate Her Way to Gold
***** CORRECTION: Correction: In "Going for Broke" (Olympics, Jan. 23, 2006) we incorrectly stated that "Daphnis and Chloe" was written by Rachmaninoff. It was actually written by Maurice Ravel. NEWSWEEK regrets the error. ***** Byline:...
Iran's Rogue Rage; Nukes: Iranians Want Nuclear Know-How-And Seem to Be Daring the West to Stop Them
Byline: Christopher Dickey, Maziar Bahari and Babak Dehghanpisheh (With Scott Johnson and Michael Hastings in Baghdad, Owen Matthews in Moscow, Michael Hirsh in Washington and Alan Isenberg in New York) On the ski slopes of Dizin in north Tehran,...
It's Sasha's Turn; Sasha Cohen: Figure Skating
Byline: Mark Starr There has never been any doubt about Sasha Cohen's dazzling talent--not since, at 15, she was runner-up to Michelle Kwan at the 2000 U.S. Championships. "She has that quality of looking beautiful while moving exquisitely," says...
I Want Constantine's Murderer to Die; I'd Always Been against the Death Penalty, but That All Changed When a Brutal Crime Hit Close to Home
Byline: Olga Polites (POLITES lives in Cherry Hill, N.J.) I was the one who was home on that Tuesday afternoon in 2000, just having gotten back from a jog. Since my husband was walking in the door from work, I was the one who answered the phone...
Joe Biden: It's Time to Change the Conversation
Byline: Jonathan Darman Things the Samuel Alito confirmation hearings taught us about Joe Biden: he has a grandfather named Finnegan, a couple of Ivy League-educated kids, a thing for hats and a love of his own voice. The Delaware senator's verbal...
Lobbying: The Web Widens
Byline: Mark Hosenball, Michael Isikoff and Holly Bailey Ohio Rep. Robert Ney personally lobbied the then Secretary of State Colin Powell to relax U.S. sanctions on Iran. Who asked him to? A convicted airplane broker who had just taken the congressman...
Monks: Capturing the Sound of Silence
Byline: Elise Soukup Squirreled away in the French Alps, the monks of the Carthusian Order are considered by some to be the strictest order of the Roman Catholic Church. They don't eat meat, they don't sleep in intervals longer than three hours...
Newsmakers
Byline: Nicki Gostin, Jac Chebatoris Kate Beckinsale dons the vampire suit again for the sequel "Underworld: Evolution." She spoke with NEWSWEEK's Nicki Gostin. Your husband [Len Wiseman] directed the movie. Was that weird? KATE BECKINSALE...
Peak Performers; Some Have Waited Four Years, Others Their Lives. Either Way, Olympians Train to Be at Their Best When It Counts
Byline: Devin Gordon, MARK STARR, BRET BEGUN, Bret Begun APOLO ANTON OHNO SPEED SKATING The last time the world's eyes were on Apolo Anton Ohno, short-track speed skating's first superstar was beaming from the top of a medal podium in Salt Lake...
Perspectives
" 'I'm going to shoot myself or... die some other way'." Seminole County, Fla., Sheriff Don Eslinger, recounting the words of Chris Penley, 15, fatally shot by a SWAT team after threatening students with a pellet gun "I have racked my memory about...
Read'Em and Weep; Lower Expectations, Let the Senate Self-Destruct: A Supreme Success Formula
Byline: Evan Thomas and Daniel Klaidman (With Richard Wolffe, Jonathan Darman, Martha Brant and Steve Tuttle) Sam Alito's handlers were anxious. In the many hours of practice for Alito's confirmation hearings--so-called murder boards held in an...
Real Life, No Police Chases
Byline: Anna Quindlen Scrawled on the memo pad on my desk are three items: flap copy, boots, college forms. The professional, the sartorial, the maternal. The mundane. The notes on the minutiae of my daily life are a hedge against the unreliable...
Sweet Deals: Bulk Up, Then Break Up
Byline: Allan Sloan This is a pop quiz: is it better for companies to grow bigger and more diversified, or for them to shrink and get lean and mean and focused? If you're a Wall Street investment banker, things are good either way. At least they're...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Bode Miller had just pulled off one of the greatest feats in Olympic skiing history--one his coach compared to scoring four touchdowns in the fourth quarter of a football game--and Devin Gordon was there. At the 2002 Games...
The Last Hurrah; the Baby Boomers Tacked Left, Then Right. Where Will Their Politics Go in the Golden Years? the 'I Want It All and I Want It Now' Crowd Confronts Its Hardest Campaigns
Byline: Howard Fineman When Bill Clinton ran for president in 1992, his campaign-trail theme was the exuberant Fleetwood Mac anthem "Don't Stop Thinking About Tomorrow." Fourteen years later, that "tomorrow" has arrived for the first baby-boomer...
The Making of a Candidate; 'Sharon's Guy' Prepares to Lead Israel the Rest of the Way
Byline: Kevin Peraino (With Joanna Chen in Jerusalem) Israel's interim prime minister wasted little time on polite chitchat. Last Tuesday afternoon, at a private meeting with a select group of foreign politicians, Ehud Olmert launched into a monologue...
The Ugly Truth; When James Frey Embellished His Rap Sheet in His Best-Selling Memoir, Did He Cross the Line into Fiction?
Byline: Marc Peyser (With Karen Springen and Jac Chebatoris) James Frey is not a guy who backs away from a fight. He's got a pit bull. He's got a mean tongue, too. A few years ago he told a reporter that Dave Eggers's "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering...
Travel: Don't Call It A Fat Farm
Byline: Tara Weingarten Barbara Steinberg spent the holidays overindulging. "I drank too many martinis and ate too many desserts," says the New Jersey-based surgery professor. So, to kick-start her New Year's weight-loss plan, she booked a week...
When the 'Bubble' Bursts; Soderbergh's New Movie Is Opening in a Living Room near You
Byline: Sean Smith If you could watch "King Kong" at home on opening night, would you go see it in a movie theater anyway? If the movie were "Capote," would you make the same decision? More important, should you even have the choice? That last question...
You Don't Know Bode; on a Pair of Skis, No One in the World Is More Dazzling to Watch. Once They Come off and He Opens His Mouth? That's When Bode Miller Starts to Get Really Interesting
Byline: Devin Gordon Bode Miller, the most gifted American skier in decades, talks the same way he races: fast, loose and seemingly out of control. He has a smirking disrespect for the media, a stance he'll repeat until your recorder runs out of...