Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 131, No. 8, February 23

A Daughter's Secrets
On e-mail to a friend and perhaps in confidences to her mother, Monica seems to have told the tale of an affair with Bill Clinton. The family saga behind the scandal. The E-mails are chatty and crude, probably no different from countless other messages...
An Asian Gold Rush? Maybe Not
Sure, there are bargains in the East's economic rubble. But the Western dealmakers now swooping in won't find easy pickings. Listen up, Asia. Sandy Weill has a better idea. Breakfasting at Tokyo's plush Okura Hotel, Wall Street's No. 1 dealmaker...
A Nice Problem to Have: At Computer Associates, It's Power or Money
It's not every day that you see corporate executives walk away from an almost-sure billion dollars for themselves. But that's exactly what the three top managers at Computer Associates, the big, brash and oh-so-New York software company, did last...
A Woman's Liberation
The first time I went to see "Titanic" was business. Like anyone who covers entertainment, I had to see it. My husband and I went to a late-night showing at the Loews Astor Plaza in New York--a theater named, coincidentally, for the family of John...
Beyond the Concorde, and Other Fantasy Flights
Your plane's delayed and you're waiting. And waiting. And waiting. For what? Not much more than the promise of a cramped seat, an over-nuked chicken dinner and a third-rate movie you can't even hear because someone's kid won't stop wailing. But hang...
'Fly Jock' Rides High
When novelists like Toni Morson want to promote a new book, they go on "Oprah." But when Oprah wants to pitch a project, she goes on "The Tom Joyner Morning Show." Joyner's Dallas-based mix of R&B music, comedy and politics is the country's top...
Honk If You're a Titaniac
Titanic's" doomed lovers Rose and Jack never had the chance to get married. Nancy Scannell and David Cousins seem to want to make it up to them: next fall, the New Jersey couple is having a "Titanic" wedding. The bride will wear a custom-made reproduction...
Ilya's Art: With a Great Gold-Medal Skate, a Rosy-Cheeked Russian Esthete Proved Stronger Than the Macho
With a great gold-medal skate, a rosy-cheeked Russian esthete proved stronger than the macho Elvis Stojko When Russia's Aleksei Urmanov upset Elvis Stojko for the Olympic figure-skating gold back in 1994, the judges had clearly opted for the esthetic...
Into Thick Air: Snowboarding Makes It High-Anxiety Olympic Debut
Never has the olympics embraced a sport quite so quickly as snowboarding. The International Olympic Committee hoped the infant sport would invigorate its lineup of spectator-unfriendly sports like speed skating and bobsled. And, with former MTV veejay...
Just Add Truffles: Epicures Are Awash in Their Favorite Fungi
They're scattered over green salads and slipped between two halves of a fat scallop, they're lavished on risottos and noodles and pizzas and steak tartare. It's truffle season, and high-end restaurants are awash in the fragrant little fungi as never...
Must a Parent Testify?
You may not like what Starr is up to. But outside the media glare, hardball is the rule, not the exception. Confronted with President Clinton's Stonewall strategy, Kenneth Starr is playing hardball. Last week his prosecutors grilled Marcia Lewis...
On the Trail of the Real Mount Sinai
Just as Rome is one big open-air museum, so the Near East is one big archeological dig where discoveries resonate with Biblical places, people and events. Now a controversial new book popularizes the claim by two adventurers that they uncovered evidence...
Our Titanic Love Affair
THE ARTS A chick-flick period piece with a tragic endings is rewriting the Hollywood rules. It's about to become the first billion-dollar movie. Why are we all sobbing with pleasure? Even James Cameron is, he says, "a little bit mystified"...
Reagan
He didn't learn it in Hollywood. Two miles upstream from Dixon, Ill., on the banks of the Rock River, lies a 300-acre forested sanctuary called Lowell Park, where, seven decades ago, Ronald Reagan really discovered how to play the hero. Now, all these...
Tantrums and True Believers: Clinton's Fate May Wind Up with the Roughest Panel in the Hill
Clinton's fate may wind up with the roughest panel on the Hill. Imagine this scenario. Monica Lewinsky is called before the House Judiciary Committee as it gravely considers articles of impeachment against the president of the United States. Let's...
The Armchair Air War: In All the Bloodless Iraq Analysis, We May Forget That Unforeseen Things Happen in Warfare
I can't remember a run-up to a war--or whatever it is we are about to have with Iraq--as strange as this. It seems to have all the urgency for people of a once-a-week seminar on international relations. That may change as the administration steps...
The Golden Girl
The sun shone and the stars aligned for Picabo Street's triumphant comeback from injury, the highlight of the week for Team U.S.A. How strong was her aura? She won by 1/100 of a second. Last week Picabo Street achieved a kind of harmonic convergence...
The Last Dogs Go to War; Bound by Loyalty and a Love of Spin, the Clintonites Are Making One Final Stand
To an average political operative, the New York Times story would have been a live grenade. The president, the paper reported, had secretly met with his secretary to share recollections of his meetings with Monica Lewinsky. But to Mickey Kantor, battle-ready...
'Triangle of Death': A Futile Attempt to Stop Algeria's Terror
Under the watch of rifle-toting escorts, journalists visiting Algeria last week were allowed to travel into an area south of the capital known as the "Triangle of Death." In the village of Sidi Harried, fresh graves dot two cemeteries. Blood stains...
Why U.S. Should Bomb
Our allies are split, bombing won't solve anything permanently and innocent people will die. So why should we whack Iraq? The answer lies in the three p's--principle, prudence and posterity. Saddam is not just violating some obscure, technical...
Yeltsin's War Games: As Diplomacy Ebbs, an American Air War against Iraq Draws Closer. but Whose Side Is Moscow On?
As diplomacy ebbs, an American air war against Iraq draws closer. But whose side is Moscow on? President Boris Yeltsin is Bill Clinton's friend and "partner," Russia's avatar of democracy, free markets and cooperation among great powers. His foreign...