Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 3, July 20

A Life after the New Yorker
It was the talk of the town when Tina Brown quit, looking for 'something magical' with Miramax LAST WEDNESDAY MORNING, WHEN Tina Brown announced to her staff that she was leaving as editor of The New Yorker after six years, she said all the right things....
A Mystery in Manhattan
An affluent octogenarian with an eclectic salon disappears-and police suspect a mother-son duo IRENE SILVERMAN WAS ALWAYS AN artful hostess, and the family mansion on East 65th Street in Manhattan was her canvas. After her real-estate-magnate husband...
A Reagan Shrine in the Sky
Tending the flame at the Gipper's beloved ranch IT FEELS AS IF HE NEVER LEFT. WANDERIng through Rancho del Cielo, Ronald Reagan's old retreat in the hills high above Santa Barbara, Calif., a visitor gets the palpable sense of having walked in on a presidency-and...
At War over a Tragic Film
Putting a price on the home movie of JFK's murder IT WAS NOV. 22, 1963. HENRY ZAPRUDER had just heard the news that President Kennedy had been shot and wounded. Zapruder's father, Abraham, called and said, "The president is dead." The younger Zapruder...
A Virtual Masterpiece
NOONE KNOWS WHY Michelangelo did it. One day in about 1555, he took a sledgehammer to one of his greatest sculptures, the eight-foot-tall Florentine Pieta" -a tragically expressionist carving of a dying Christ in the arms of Mary Magdalene, Nicodemus...
A Web of Lies
When Internet entrepreneurs do business, anything goes LET'S DO THIS! LET'S JUST DO IT! WE'VE got to do it! On the battlefield known as the Internet business, the war whoops resound thousands of times a day. Everyone is looking for the main chance,...
Billionaires in the Sun
Hot topics at an annual media-mogul confab NO ONE KNOWS WHERE THE RUMOR began, but it couldn't be dismissed out of hand. At least not by the gold-plated crowd gathered in Sun Valley last week for dealmaker Herbert Allen's now famous media and communications...
Blasts from the Bleachers
Alternative baseball magazines are a hit with fans SEATTLE MARINERS FAN VICKY Karlson has a low threshold for rah-rah blather- she takes her baseball seriously. That's why when Karlson catches the Mariners at the Kingdome, she shells out two bucks for...
Death of a Prisoner
Politics can be a very dangerous profession NIGERIANS WERE TINGLING WITH expectation. Last Tuesday they packed into their neighborhood taverns, where every television was tuned to the World Cup semifinal. The Nigerian national team, talented but raw,...
Disorder in the Court
Dow Corning's breast-implant settlement was a victory for junk science-maybe one of the last FOUR MONTHS AFTER LAURA BOWDEN had Dow Coming silicone breast implants surgically inserted into her chest in 1990, she knew something was wrong. First came...
Down the Aisle
Can Generation Xers--many of them the children of divorce--make their own marriages last? DAPHNE DYER AND GREG Owens didn't meet in an exotic foreign land. They've never galloped bareback along a moonlit beach. And when the marriage proposal came, it...
Fallout from a Media Fiasco
The public's faith in the press may be at a new low. A behind-the-scenes look at a CNN-Time blunder over nerve gas helps explain why. April Oliver, former Columbia, S.C., debutante, would-be Olympic swimmer, Princeton graduate and, until two weeks ago,...
Family Ties: From Autocracy to Democracy
The execution of Nicholas II, his wife, Tsarina Alexandra, and their five children ended 300 years of uninterrupted Romanov rule. It did not, however, prevent descendants from laying claim to the throne. A look at the Romanovs before and after the last...
Hillary's Next Life
With an eye on history, the First Lady is getting ready for the home stretch-and soon she'll have to build a future, from books to corporate boards HILLARY CLINTON WAS LOOKING out the window, and into the future. Cruising in a limousine over Manhattan's...
Home at Last
Finally, the murdered Romanovs will be laid to rest. Their deaths were the real beginning of the 20th century. Their controversial burial marks its close. THE ROMANOVS WILL COME home this week, their five three-and-a-half-foot wooden coffins borne through...
Hot Picks for the Home Office
Contributing Editor Steve Bass is president of the Pasadena IBM users group. Cool Tools That Make Small Businesses Sizzle THE FIVE-BUTTON SCAN THROW AWAY your copier. Get rid of your fax machine. I have a better idea: the Visioneer PaperPort One Touch...
'How the Heavens Go'
Science and religion are supposed to be antagonists. History tells a more complicated story. THAT MANY CONTEMPORARY SCIENTISTS MAKE ROOM FOR God in their understanding of the cosmos should hardly be surprising. For most of history, religion and science...
Knock on Woody, He's Doing Fine
The director responds to rumors of turmoil WOODY ALLEN WANTS To COME clean. One Saturday. he gives NEWSWEEK a long interview about the state of his art and finances, about which there is suddenly speculation. He is upbeat and unflappable. But after...
Make the WEB Do the WORK
Get money. Find help. Cut through red tape. All on the Net. Ken Fermoyle is a Los Angeles-based freelance technology writer and a syndicated computer columnist. IT LETS ME SPEND less time on the piddling, time-consuming tasks involved in running my...
Playing to the Crowds
Hollywood's mixed bag of movies for the masses FUNNY THING ABOUT THE TERM crowd pleaser. Depending on who's using it, it's just as likely to be condescending as complimentary. Like a people pleaser, a crowd pleaser is automatically suspected of being...
Science Finds God
The achievements of modern science seem to contradict religion and undermine faith. But for a growing number of scientists, the same discoveries offer support for spirituality and hits of the very nature of God. THE MORE DEEPLY SCIENtists see into the...
Sibling Ribaldry
The Farrelly brothers are the new kings of crude--off screen and on. You loved their debut, 'Dumb and Dumber'? Wait until you meet 'Mary.' THE FARRELLY BROTHERS HAVE something they want to show you--and it isn't their new movie. In fact, it's something...
The Buzz Brothers
Tina's new partners are loud, cheap and smart HARVEY WEINSTEiN, THE LOUDER HALF OF THE MIRAMAX BROTHERS, HAS ALWAYS wanted to rim a magazine. His first move came in 1994. Riding on the success of his studio's latest hit, "Pulp Fiction," be called Kurt...
The Game of Good Will
JOHNSON won the decathlon gold medal at the 1960 Olympics. His autobiography, "The Best That I Can Be," will be published in August. Athletes now compete free of the political pressures I felt in Moscow during the cold war ON JULY 19 I WILL HAVE THE...
The Gap for the Rich
It looks like good old denim-but it's deluxe EVER SINCE CALVIN KLEIN MET Brooke Shields, people have been willing to pay crazy prices for blue jeans. After all, designer jeans are a ready-made and comfortable-to-wear status symbol--and you only have...
The KLA's Moment
The separatists now have a serious army MACHINE-GUN FIRE CHASED THE speeding Volkswagen into the besieged village of Lausha, in central Kosovo. Serb gunners were sitting in an armored car atop a wooded hilltop less than 500 yards away, but they missed...
Who Needs Doctors? the Boom in Home Testing
THE MILLENNIUM NOTEBOOK YOU'VE ALWAYS wondered if Junior is really yours? A paternity test would tell you, but it would cost a lot of money, you'd have to deal with doctors and it would be embarrassing--right? Wrong. Now you can just wipe a cotton...