Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 21, November 23

An Assassination Diary
The last surviving passenger of JFK's death car rediscovers a long-lost record of the murder. I will fight anybody that argues with me about those three shots," says the last survivor of the Lincoln Continental that rolled through Dealey Plaza in...
A New Legend for the Fall
Nintendo's latest Zelda adventure shines All too rarely, a game like Myst comes along that draws us in so deeply, we feel we've become part of the story. With the engaging new Nintendo 64 game The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, lightning has...
A New O.J. Trial-For Sydney and Justin
Just when you thought the O. J. Simpson legal drama had finally faded away, it's back. Last week a Los Angeles appeals court overturned a 1996 lower-court decision granting O.J. custody of his two kids and ordered a new trial to determine whether he's...
An Icon from Our Sponsor
Free computers with a catch--that little ad in the corner of the screen It was a tempting deal for a cash-strapped school: 15 new computers, a powerful server, on-location teacher training and a speedy satellite connection to the Internet--all free....
A Thriller on Wall Street
Michael Jackson wants to be a hit with investors Michael jackson periodically pops into public view, his emergence often stage-managed in minute detail, including the well-placed tabloid leak. There he is before the cameras with his latest business...
At War within the Ranks
Competing GOP tribes fight over who's in charge It was a nice gesture. for days House Republicans Steve Largent and Jennifer Dunn have been locked in combat as they fight to become the next House majority leader. While most congressmen were back...
Blue Skies Ahead: Hot Ways to Cool Down Our Cities
Salt lake city is stunning in the winter, with beautiful mountain scenery and plenty of fresh, crisp air. Summertime, however, can be another story. The hot desert sun beats down onto the city, baking the residents in 100-degree-plus temperatures and...
Books Caught in the Web
Barnes & Noble takes on rival Amazon.com Press releases are generally bland and inoffensive things, designed to hide as much as they reveal. But in the wake of the news that the book industry's biggest retailer, Barnes & Noble, was buying...
Case of the Century? So Far the Microsoft Antitrust Trial Has Delivered a Lot of Fun E-Mail but Little Law
Last week's top witness sound bite in the Microsoft trial was "Sympathy for the Devil," the Rolling Stone ditty that an Intel executive thought an appropriate theme song for Bill Gates and Co. The previous week it was "Knife the baby," the phrase attributed...
Chuckie, Phil, Lil-You're Wanted on the Set!
The TV smash 'Rugrats' leaps to the big screen. The twins think it's 'more fun than picking noses.' Glance down the list of credits for The Rugrats Movie and you start to fret. The lineup of musicians who sing on the score reads like an index of...
Deja Vu All over Again
Yes, we've been down this road before. But a prolonged standoff between Bill Clinton and Saddam Hussein looks better than any of the other alternatives. It's like the rerun of a particularly unsatisfying movie. Saddam Hussein provokes a confrontation...
Fast Lane on the Infobahn
Two routes: the phone companies or the cable guy. When the poet Longfellow said that all things come to those who wait, he was doubtless thinking of the World Wide Web. Waiting is a central feature of the Web experience. The colorful moving graphics,...
Finding a Third Way: Cleaner Cars and a Stronger Economy: America Can Have Both
For decades, our nation's capital was home to an endless and stale debate about two great challenges: should we focus on strong economic growth and job creation, or should we take aggressive action to protect our air, our water and our precious open...
Learning the Hard Way: My Decision to Drink and Drive Almost Cost Two People Their Lives, and Changed Mine Forever
It was after midnight when the police came for me. I was standing in the kitchen, stunned, not sure what had just happened or what to do about it. But it all became surrealistically clear as I was led from my own house in handcuffs, bathed in flashing...
Now It's the Gay Nineties?
As a sex scandal fizzles in the British government, life gets better for homosexuals all over the Continent At first, it looked like a classic British tabloid drama: shock and horror over gays in the cabinet. Late last month a minister in Tony Blair's...
On MTV, A Star Is Slain
Combatants on the wrestling sendup 'Celebrity Deathmatch' take a licking, but don't keep on ticking It takes a lot to keep Barbra Streisand down. A tough childhood, unconventional beauty, critical opprobrium--none of these has stayed the diva from...
Polishing Jewel:She's Everywhere, with a Best-Selling Book, a Feature Movie Role and, at Last, a New Album
The rumor was that jewel was recording a Christmas album. She was back in the studio for the first time since the release of 1995's multiplatinum debut, "Pieces of You." And while the new album, Spirit, is not at all Christmas-themed, it is inspirational...
Rear Window
There's no question that Christopher Reeve deserves all the praise he can get. Not only did he refuse to fade away after the 1995 horseback-riding accident that paralyzed him, but he's also campaigned tirelessly for a cure for spinal-cord injuries....
Running for Their Lives
A surprising number of government officials have fled Iraq in the past year. They're convinced the regime is crumbling. Abbas al-janabi was in the middle of negotiating a major cigarette-smuggling deal when he realized he had to get out of Iraq--fast....
She's Still in Vogue
In her 10 years as editrix of the premier fashion magazine, Anna Wintour has presided over a provocative mix of 'mass and class.' Anna wintour's first cover as editor of Vogue in November 1988 was a model in faded jeans and a $10,000 Christian Lacroix...
Starr on the Stand
Under siege, the prosecutor--mystified and, as he puts it, 'vexed' about his low standing--prepares to face tough questions. For the past week, the drab conference room of the Office of Independent Counsel has been serving as a stand-in for the...
Stone Cold Crazy!
Wrestling, the 'sport' that won't go away, is bigger and raunchier than ever. Jesse Ventura's headed for a governor's mansion and Steve Austin is the drinking, cursing, butt-whupping lord of the ring. You want a piece of him? I got my snakebite...
The Pluck of the Irish
Ned Devine is dead--and still holding the winning lottery ticket. Now everybody's looking to cash in. David kelly, 69, wasn't concerned about shooting the scene in question. He figured that when the day arrived he wouldn't really be riding the motorcycle...
The View from Baghdad
It was midsummer 1998, the high tide of Monicagate. Ken Starr was outmaneuvering Bill Clinton, and so was Saddam Hussein. At least that's how the Iraqi president saw it. Saddam came to believe last August that he would soon outlast another American...
The View from the Big Three
The CEOs weigh in on the future of cars and car buying These are busy days in the Motor City. Since last summer's crippling strike, General Motors chief executive Jack Smith has unveiled two major reorganizations, the latest big steps in GM's continuing...
Time to Close Up Shop
Had enough of Starr & Co.? The case for abolishing the independent-counsel statute. Ten years ago justice Antonin Scalia foresaw just about everything about the independent-counsel law. "[T]he independent counsel operating in an area where so...
Tom Wolfe's Rooftop Yawp
His crackling novel deserves to be news. But America is better than Wolfe's Atlanta. Time was, novels mattered to mass audiences. When Charles Dickens was serializing "The Old Curiosity Shop," New Yorkers gathered at the docks to greet ships carrying...
What's 'Alternative'?
Middle America has dabbled in alternative care since the 1970s. But as Harvard researchers reported in JAMA's lead article, the trend has exploded during the '90s. By comparing their new survey results with earlier ones, the researchers showed that...
Whitney on the Record
The diva reflects and rages on rumors and her music Whitney Houston is a little wound up. Sitting in an elegant suite at the St. Regis Hotel in New York, she's got the wear and tear of recording an album, as well as keeping up with her 5-year-old...
Why UNSCOM Matters
The chief inspector explains how Saddam's tactics undermine the world's 40-year effort to put civilization ahead of technology. If another crisis with iraq goes off the boil, people inevitably will ask whether it was worth all the trouble and expense...