Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 133, No. 4, January 25

A Former Insider with a Troubled Conscience Turns on the Increasingly Besieged Firearms Industry
Is He the Smoking Gun? For more than a decade, Robert Hass was a Smith & Wesson trigger man. As the vice president in charge of sales and marketing for the world's largest handgun manufacturer, Hass figured out new and innovative ways to sell...
Another Day, Another Indignity
Dilbert hits prime time -- and gets the job done Here's the answer to the ques- tion nobody's been asking: Dilbert's butt is ample, yet reasonably well sculpted. It does not jiggle excessively when he steps into the shower, nor is it unduly lumpy....
A Second Opinion on Sex
A medical editor is fired over a survey of what college kids say is -- and isn't -- going all the way Would you say you had sex ... if ... a person had oral contact with your genitals?" The question wouldn't faze readers of Cosmo or the Starr Report....
A Simple Plan (Part II)
AT&T's marriage with TCI was to be fiendishly complex. Now it's not. So what happened? In one of sir arthur conan Doyle's best-known Sherlock Holmes stories, "Silver Blaze," the key element is something that didn't happen. To wit, a dog that...
Basking under A Cloud
The Clinton Counterattack: As the president's lawyers defend him in the Senate dock, he goes to the podium of the House to remind the country that he's a master of policy, an able steward of boom times. The people are listening, but in Washington the...
Before the Bar of History
Why old presidents can never stop running for posterity's approval. Bill clinton won't begin his last campaign until after he's left Washington, probably in 2001. Former presidents have no official role, and the confident ones (Truman, Eisenhower,...
Finally, Another Team Can Win the NBA Title -- but Fewer Fans May Care to Watch
Basketball Looks at Life After 23 They wasted no time re-retiring Michael Jordan's hallowed No. 23. Just minutes after Jordan made official what had been known for days, suspected for weeks and dreaded for months, Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf gave...
Go for the Greed
Squeaky-clean Salt Lake City won the 2002 Winter Games -- but may have paid for them with its soul. They once called it the city of the Saints, and it only takes a few hours in Salt Lake City to understand why. The city is built around the magnificent...
He Scored as Much for Corporate America as He Did for the Bulls. Sports Marketing Will Never Be the Same
No Heirs to Air Jordan Will anyone be big enough to fill Michael Jordan's size-13 Nikes? That's not just a question for the NBA, but also for Nike and the companies that rely on Jordan -- and other athletes -- to sell their shoes, clothes, cars...
My Farewell to Fandom
I've got to save my son from my obsessive love of sports -- I just hope it's not too late Not to brag, but my 8-year-old son might be one of the most prodigiously talented sports fans to come out of this region in quite some time. His natural aptitude...
Need Stamps, Stocks, Plane Tickets? Step Up to an ATM
Remember when getting cash meant going to the bank and giving the teller your passbook? No? We don't either. With 200,000 ATMs located everywhere from gas stations to bars, it's easy to stay solvent without ever visiting a bank branch. And now that...
New Faces of '99
A lot of celebrities are sick of being famous. And, come to think of it, we're sick of their being famous, too. Here are some worthy replacements -- actors, singers and artists who are about to brighten up the new year. Leelee SOBIESKI Eyes...
Playground Justice
A mother who fought sexual harassment in her daughter's class takes her case to the top When lashonda davis came home from school one December afternoon in 1992, she told her mother that a boy at school had been "messing" with her -- grabbing at...
Say Anything about Anyone
Our political landscape is strewn with terrible accusations that never seem to get resolved No matter how the yearlong effort to call Bill Clinton to account finally comes out -- acquittal, conviction or simply continuing confusion -- it is likely...
'Shoot the Criminals'
In a rare interview, Habibie talks about his country's 'dirty' economy and its intolerance Indonesian President B. J. Habibie, 62, took power last May when his longtime mentor, President Suharto, stepped down in the face of student riots brought...
The Accusations and the Defense
Last week Republican House "managers" detailed the charges for both impeachment counts against Bill Clinton. This week the president's lawyers will outline their defense. Perjury In his Aug. 17, 1998, grand-jury appearance, "William Jefferson...
The End of the Miracle Exclusive: The Inside Story of How a Handful of Businessmen and Politicians Brought Russia to Its Knees
It was the middle of the night on Sunday, Aug. 16, but Moscow's White House was surround- ed by four-wheel-drive Jeeps -- the "chase cars" of choice for bodyguards in postcommunist Russia. They were parked not far from the spot where in 1991 Boris...
The Message from Brazil
The economic calm of recent months has been reassuring and, quite probably, misleading If nothing else, brazil has shattered the soothing notion that the world economy is slowly but surely on the mend. What happened last week (the surprise devaluation...
The Samba Effect
A devaluation of Brazil's currency spooked global stock markets last week. Then came a last-minute recovery, and investors sighed with relief. What happens next? Itamar franco, the ex-presi- dent of Brazil, doesn't shrink from a brawl -- especially...
Unmasking Sybil
A re-examination of the most famous psychiatric patient in history The last day of shirley Ardell Mason's remarkable life was peaceful. She was at home, in the two-story gray bungalow on Henry Clay Boulevard in Lexington, Ky., that had been her...
You've Seen All the Games and All the Ads, but You Don't Know the Real Michael Jordan. Just Ask His Friends
There are rituals that shape the life of Michael Jordan. At the end of the 1998 NBA playoffs, as he has for the last 13 years, he went to the North Carolina basketball camp run by his old school friend, Fred Whitfield. This is Jordan's country, a morning's...