Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 133, No. 16, April 19

A Baby Face and a Cold Heart
The last U.S. Ambassador to Belgrade offers a firsthand report on how the steely and controlling Milosevic operates. What struck me about Slobodan Milosevic was that he didn't look like a normal Balkan politician. He looked like a Westerner. At...
A Family's Terrifying Odyssey
Milosevic's Victims: All was quiet--then the war came, and the Brahushi clan's world fell apart. Ducking the Serbs, they were driven first into their basement, then onto a cattle truck and into the camps. Now they're on the run, far from home. The...
A Great Leap Backward
'Targeted' tax cuts are usually a smoke screen for a maze of complex, ineffective tax breaks I used to write passionately about tax reform-- arguing for a simpler system, with lower rates and fewer tax preferences--but I have given up. It is a lost...
A New Generation Draws the Line
The British prime minister makes NATO's case against Milosevic--and pledges that the allies will 'see it through.' We have learnt by bitter experience not to appease dictators. We tried it 60 years ago. It didn't work then and it shouldn't be tried...
A Place They Can Call Home
Many African-American seniors are facing a novel question: how, and with whom, to live after a life of work? Every day for three months, Mabel Chambers walked the half mile from her part-time job at a day-care center in Greensboro, N.C., to the...
Bad Bet: A Fixer and His Losses
A college gambler who served time looks back Kevin Pendergast wore no. 12 when he kicked the winning field goal for Notre Dame in the 1994 Cotton Bowl. Five years later he got a new number: 11057424. Those eight digits were his federal prison ID...
Barksdale Kicks Back
The former Netscape boss talks about his future You would never expect to find Jim Barksdale, the former CEO of Netscape Communications, sitting in his living room late on a Wednesday morning. Outside, in downtown Palo Alto, Calif., traffic is backing...
Big Money, Big Trouble
Frank Capaci hit the jackpot. That part was easy. Before the winner of last week's $197 million lotto jackpot in Boston starts celebrating, he should talk to Frank Capaci. Just a year ago, Capaci was the sole winner of a $195 million Powerball...
Country Music Mystery
Tammy's kids sue her husband and doctor The three-minute melodramas of Tammy Wynette's songs always seemed pretty tame compared with her life--one kidnapping, four divorces, dozens of hospitalizations for everything from addictive drugs to intestinal...
Hormones and the Mind
Estrogen therapy could help women's memory You hop into your car, but, wait, where are the keys? You meet someone new, but her name is gone before the handshake's over. Those are failures of your short-term, or "working," memory--the place you file...
Inclined to Miss Patsy
Singer Mandy Barnett channels the legend Patsy Cline is one of the most sacred angels of country music, but there was a time when Mandy Barnett got pretty sick of her. For two years, Barnett portrayed Cline in a Nashville musical, "Always--Patsy...
In the Red in Greenwich
A landlord tries to evict Long Term Capital To business junkies, LTCM stands for Long Term Capital Management, that now infamous hedge fund that got a $3.65 billion federally orchestrated bailout last fall. But LTCM has now taken on a second meaning:...
It's Time to Open the Doors of Our Prisons
Freeing first-time offenders is the compassionate answer. It also makes good economic sense. Americans, once so kind-hearted, have become lusty punishers. Since President Nixon's "war" on crime, the public has become increasingly intolerant of wrongdoers,...
Mail Call
The Picture of Health We've heard from more than 100 readers so far about our special issue on women's health, many congratulating us and announcing that the magazine is a definite keeper. "I plan to [put] it next to my medical dictionary," wrote...
Maximizing the Matrix
Fusing state-of-the-art special effects and kicky kung fu sequences, the Wachowski brothers regenerate the sagging cyberspace genre Five minutes into "The Matrix," a leather-clad woman squares off against the local police. As they open fire, she...
Second in Command
In a NEWSWEEK interview, Al Gore on ground troops, Milosevic, Primakov- -and the lessons of Vietnam The Vice President met with NEWSWEEK's Howard Fineman and Debra Rosenberg last Friday afternoon in his West Wing office. Excerpts: NEWSWEEK: Are...
Show Us the Money!
It's the ultimate talent show. M.B.A. students nationwide compete to write the best business plan, win funding, found a start-up, get rich. Whee! It was standing room only at MIT's Sloan School of Management last month as 150 teams gathered for...
Sightseeing on the Run
No time for tours? Take a jog through history instead. Aldous Huxley once said that for a European, "the greatest charm of travel in the New World is the high ratio of its geography to its history." For an American in Europe, the charm is the reverse....
The Children of the Ice
Three perfectly preserved mummies, sacrificed 500 years ago, promise to reveal the Incas' spiritual beliefs and political alliances. They were the children of the noble or the powerful, chosen for the highest honor the Inca civilization could bestow:...
The Good Soldier
Clinton and Gore have a war to run, but it's the vice president who may answer for it in 2000. In presidential politics, revolts tend to start in Iowa living rooms. So Al Gore, in the midst of his first long campaign swing, knew he had to tread...
The Iceman Catches Fire
Kevin Spacey shines in an American stage classic The battle of the salesmen, Willy vs. Hickey, has been joined on Broadway. Willy, of course, is the protagonist of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," in the acclaimed revival. Hickey is the pivotal...
The Man Behind the Agony
In the Line of Fire: As the war rages and a million innocents suffer, the man who started it, Slobodan Milosevic, seems an enigma. Who is he? A dictator determined to cling to power no matter what the cost--or who gets hurt. His mind and motives. ...
The Reefs and the Wrecks
Diving in a danger zone After more than half a century of armed struggle, East Timor hardly seems the place for a family vacation. Hulks of ships lie rotting on the white sand beaches of Dili, the capital. Bloated pigs wander in and out of thatched...
The Science of A Good Marriage
Psychology is unlocking the secrets of happy couples. The myth of marriage goes like this: somewhere out there is the perfect soul mate, the yin that meshes easily and effortlessly with your yang. And then there is the reality of marriage, which,...
Wandering in the Wilderness
Refugees are homeless, stateless--and often hopeless. The least we can do is help them hold fast to their identities. Refugees are like sands scattered by hostile political winds. They are a fourth world, the symbols of the 20th century--they include...
Was the Spymaster Too Sloppy?
A former CIA chief is investigated for a casual approach to secret data Bill Richardson was in a bind. When allegations emerged last month that China had penetrated the nation's top-secret nuclear labs, the Energy secretary turned to the pros for...
'We Have to Win This'
Germans, their foreign minister says, know why Milosevic must be stopped. In 1968 Joschka Fischer was a student radical. He got his start in the left-wing, pro-environment Green Party. Today Fischer is Germany's foreign minister--in a coalition...
Wide Awake in Sleepy Hollow
The making of Tim Burton's new spookfest Tim Burton is driving himself a bit batty. He's trying to shoot a scene for "Sleepy Hollow," his comic B-movieization of Washington Irving's horror classic, and nothing's coming out quite as he imagined....