Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 10

A Dreamer with 'No Fear': Mike Spann, the First Combat Casualty in Afghanistan, Had Come a Long Way from Winfield, Ala
Byline: Kevin Peraino There's not a whole lot to do for a boy growing up in Winfield, Ala.--a country town of 4,500 halfway between Birmingham and Tupelo, Miss. Johnny (Mike) Spann passed his school days like many other boys in town. He fished for...
A New Breed of Soldier: The Taliban Don't Know What Hit Them, and for Good Reason. They're Victims of a Revolution in Military Affairs That Could Be as Important as the Introduction of Gunpowder, and Is Changing the Way That We, and Everyone Else Think about War
Byline: John Barry The Afghan battlefield isn't much different from the way Genghis Khan left it in the 13th century: parched plains, mud-walled villages, craggy mountains. The fighters, some of them descendants of the Mongol invaders, haven't changed...
An 'Unapologetic' Ashcroft: Tough and Unrepentant, the Attorney General Defends the Nationwide Dragnet, and Puts Terrorists on Notice
John Ashcroft has emerged as one of the Bush administration's most forceful--and controversial--voices on bringing terrorists to justice. In an interview with NEWSWEEK last Friday, he explained the hawkish new policies--but made no excuses. Highlights:...
A 'Ring' to Rule the Screen: Peter Jackson's Fierce, Imaginative Movie Takes High-Flying Risks and Inspires with Its Power and Scale
Byline: David Ansen First, let me tell you where I'm coming from. Before I saw "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," I didn't know the difference between an orc and an elf, or what Middle-earth was in the middle of. This review is...
Before the Bar of History: Even Great Men Can Do Bad Things to Defend Freedom. the Roots of Bush's Dilemma
Byline: Stuart Taylor Jr. In 1780 Gen. George Washington, commanding an army fighting against tyranny and injustice, ordered the execution of Maj. John Andre, an accused British spy, after a hasty trial in a special military court. In 1861 President...
Bonding with Your Money: The Bull Market in Bonds May Be over. Still, They Help Keep Your Money Pretty Safe
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Funny how often investing turns into a wrong-way trip. After the stock market cracked a year and a half ago, investors bought stocks almost all the way down. Meanwhile--and behind their backs--bond prices were shooting...
Bylines
Liberty vs. Security: The War at Home It's been clear from the very start that the attacks of September 11 have profound implications for how Americans balance liberty and justice, civil rights and security. We began covering that aspect of the...
Crossed Swords, Cold Cash: A Studio Gambles on an Epic Series
Byline: John Horn A lot of show-business people think New Line Cinema is nuts to have committed $450 million to produce, distribute and market three consecutive "Lord of the Rings" movies before the first film even debuts. But the way the "Austin...
Devil's Island! Guillotines! the 'Imperial Presidency' Is a Recurring Fiction. Congressional Supremacy Is a Sturdy Fact
Byline: George F. Will The emperor is not amused. Sen. Patrick Leahy, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, is obstructing the confirmation of Emperor Bush's judicial nominees, thereby nullifying the emperor's constitutional power to staff the judicial...
Disney's Lost Magic: Why ABC, along with the Rest of the Empire, Is Struggling
Byline: Johnnie L. Roberts At Disney, CEO Michael Eisner often refers to himself as just another "cast member." But last week he seemed more the ultimate VIP guest on Disney's ABC network. Dropping by the "Monday Night Football" telecast, Eisner...
Fortress Tora Bora: Is Bin Laden Holed Up Far from the War in a CIA-Financed Network of Hardened Caves Called 'Black Widow'?
Byline: Melinda Liu In 1995 the United States pressured Sudan to expel Osama bin Laden, who had been in the African country for five years, trying his hand at both legitimate business (construction) and global terrorism. Already disowned by his...
'God Bless America'? I Just like the Tune. as an Agnostic, I Feel out of Step with a President Who Seems to Equate Faith with Patriotism
Byline: Linda Angeloff Sapienza The folding chairs were arranged in a semicircle in the church basement. As the Sunday-school teacher waited to begin class, I sat down in one of two available seats. The girl beside me whispered hurriedly, "You have...
Holy Warrior in the Hot Seat: Devout and Steely, John Ashcroft Has Found a New Mission in the Battle against Terror
Byline: Daniel Klaidman and Michael Isikoff John Ashcroft was reaching for inspiration. On a misty Washington night last week, the attorney general led a group of U.S. attorneys--his field commanders in the war on terror--on a tour of the city's...
Justice Kept in the Dark: Closed Military Tribunals. A Dragnet That's Swept Up 1,200 Men. as America Fights Terror, Where Will We Strike the Balance between Liberty and Security?
Byline: Evan Thomas and Michael Isikoff Mohammed Irshaid has lived in the United States for 22 years. Now a civil engineer in New York, the Jordanian-born Irshaid, 41, went to college in Ohio at the University of Toledo; his three children are American...
Keeping Order in the Courts: Military Trials for Terrorists Are Inevitable. but Bush Can't Be the Only One with a Gavel
Byline: Jonathan Alter I heard a story last week that suggests just how far President Bush is willing to go in curtailing civil liberties. When Attorney General John Ashcroft sent the secret first draft of the antiterrorism bill to Capitol Hill...
Let Iraq Wait. Finish Al Qaeda. Saddam Hussein Isn't Going Anywhere. the Real Danger Now Lies in the Global Terror Network
Byline: Fareed Zakaria Here we go again. With victory on the horizon in Afghanistan, Washington pundits are back to their favorite sport--debating when to topple Saddam Hussein. There's just one problem. The war against Al Qaeda is not over yet....
Lights out for Enron: Power Failure at Bush-Connected Energy Firm
Publisher correction: 11 Dec 2001 In our Dec. 10 story "Lights Out for Enron" (Business) we said that President Bush's senior political advisor, Karl Rove, had been on Enron's payroll before moving to the White House. He was not. NEWSWEEK regrets the...
Living in a Wireless World: We've Been Hearing for Years about a Future When We and Our Machines Are All Connected-Without Wires. Finally, the Pieces Are Coming Together. and Family Life Won't Be the Same
Byline: Steven Levy Is it finally time for the much-touted Wireless Big Bang, when all our devices, appliances and gadgets suddenly meld into a big goo of connectedness, and everything and everybody is in touch with each other instantly and persistently?...
Lure of the Rings: EXCLUSIVE: How a Little-Known New Zealand Director Landed the Most Ambitious Franchise in Movie History
Byline: Jeff Giles The helicopter floats toward Kahurangi National Park, and New Zealand unrolls beneath you. You see farmlands almost fluorescent green. Mountains straight out of a model-train set. Craggy limestone plateaus. Giant ferns waving...
Mail Call: Readers Discuss War and Peace, Trains and Torture, Foreign-Oil Dependence, Rules for Kids and Harry Potter
'Getting a Taste of Freedom' In your Nov. 26 piece " 'Please Don't Forget Us' " (War on Terror) you write, "But given that Washington launched the war..." Surely you realize Washington did not launch the war; Osama bin Laden and his kindred spirits...
Next Frontiers: Keeping in Touch: It Might Sound like Yada, Yada, Yada to You, but Not to the Teenagers Who Know How to Talk the Talk. Want a Lesson? Listen Up
Byline: Bret Begun Remember those reach-out-and-touch-someone commercials? Hang out with some well-wired teenagers and you'll feel better knowing they never leave each other alone. NEWSWEEK hung out with Short Hills, N.J., 17-year-old Rachel Fendell...
Next Frontiers: The New Entertainment: Still Waiting for the So-Called Digital Revolution to Change Your Home Life? Sometimes You Just Have to Take Things into Your Own Hands
Byline: N'Gai Croal They said we wanted a digital revolution, and during the '90s, the slogans came fast and furious, each more seductive than the last. The 500-channel universe. The wired home. The jukebox in the sky. Everyone can be a director....
Periscope: NEWSWEEK's Unconventional Look Behind and beyond the News. Plus, Conventional Wisdom
Byline: David France, Pat Wingert, and Gretel C. Kovach; Mark Hosenball and Daniel Klaidman; Howard Fineman and T. Trent Gegax; Geoffrey Cowley and Emily Yellin; David Ansen; Sharon Begley; Anne Underwood; Marc Peyser; Mark Starr; CHARITIES Breaking...
Perspectives
"We are an open society. But we are at war." President George W. Bush, justifying trying suspected terrorists in secret military tribunals and letting enforcement officials question thousands of foreigners in the United States "My job is to defend...
Something in the Way He Moved Us: The World Mourns George Harrison, Musician and Seeker. What He Hoped to Learn, the Beatles Couldn't Teach
Byline: Jeff Giles By the Fall of 1995, the youngest Beatle had edged into his 50s and was famously weary of things like Beatles. Still, on the eve of the multimedia reunion known as "The Beatles Anthology," George Harrison granted NEWSWEEK an interview,...
Tale of an American Taliban: In an Exclusive, a U.S. Citizen on the Horror at Qala Jangi
Byline: Colin Soloway Abdul Hamid is tall, thin and barefoot in a filthy black tunic. A prisoner of the Northern Alliance, he sits with his elbows bound with a strip of cloth behind his back, his right leg and left foot bandaged for gunshot wounds....