Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 11

All aboard the Crazy Train: Meet 'The Osbournes,' Just Your Average Family
Byline: Marc Peyser Kelly Osbourne just got a tattoo. It's no big deal--a little heart tucked high on her left hip. "If I show you, you can't kill me," she tells her dad. Mr. Osbourne takes one look--and wants to kill her. "You've got that there...
And Now, A Glimmer of Hope: A Saudi Bid to End the Arab-Israeli Conflict Was Partly a PR Move, but Now the Idea Is Taking on a Life of Its Own
Byline: Christopher Dickey Bill Clinton and the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia were talking a few weeks ago about war, of which there's a lot in Israel and the Palestinian territories, and peace, which seemed to be nowhere on the horizon, especially...
A Tragic Discovery: The Hunt for Danielle Van Dam Has Ended. Now a New Search Begins: For the Motive Behind Her Murder
Byline: Ana Figueroa and Jamie Reno Self-employed milkman Karsten Heimburger doesn't usually pay attention to the news. So when a friend asked him last week if he wanted to join volunteers searching for "the missing van Dam girl," his response was,...
Braveheart of Darkness: Mel Gibson Wages War in the Killing Fields of Vietnam
Byline: David Ansen Though it's very different in tone and style, the Vietnam War movie "We Were Soldiers" bears some uncanny similarities to "Black Hawk Down," starting with the promise of its hero, Lt. Col. Hal Moore (Mel Gibson), to leave no...
Bush and 'The Beast': Before He Became Warrior King, He Was a Clown-Prince Candidate. A Look Back at a Work in Progress
Byline: Howard Fineman If you want to be president, you have to give good plane. You have to pacify, if not win over, the media horde that travels with you. As the 2000 campaign began, George W. Bush kept his distance from a group he privately called...
Enron's Dirty Laundry: How a Vicious, 10-Year Rivalry between Two Top Executives Helped Create the Sex-Drenched, Out-of-Control Corporate Culture That Ultimately Wrecked the Company
Publisher clarification: 13 Mar 2002 In our March 11 article on Enron ("Enron's Dirty Laundry"),we incorrectly reported that former CEO Jeffrey Skilling was 'engaged to an Enron secretary [Rebecca Carter], whom he promoted to a $600,000 job." In fact,...
Head of the Class: Columbia's Incoming Chief Is Part of a New, Visionary Breed of College Presidents
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz Lee Bollinger has been a law-school professor, a dean and the head of one of the largest universities in the country. But right now, he's essentially a man without a campus. The 55-year-old First Amendment scholar is "in...
How Can Bullets and Bombs Bring Peace? Palestinians Have Cause for Grievance, but the World Won't Listen until They Return to Nonviolent Protest
Byline: Hady Amr As an Arab-American whose family lives in New York City and Washington, D.C., I've had a hard time shaking the deep sense of vulnerability created by September 11. I've also found it difficult to move beyond my fear of the ensuing...
Is the Boss Dumping Stock? Blind Faith: Lax Rules Make It Hard to Find out When Insiders Are Selling Shares. They're Likely to Change after Enron's Fall
Byline: Allan Sloan If you spend more than five minutes listening to experts talk about Enron, you keep hearing one word over and over: "transparent." No, they're not talking about a window into Enron's outlandish high jinks and power struggles....
'Is There Trouble with Jim?': When Someone You Love Hears Voices through Walls
Byline: Dirk Johnson Three years ago, Mindy Greiling sat in a psychologist's office and listened to her son, Jim, talk about wanting to kill her. "I want to shoot you in the face," he said, "because you look so evil." As a boy growing up in suburban...
Looking Grim at the Grammys: Ralph Stanley's Performance of 'O Death' Wasn't the Only Ominous Note. This May Have Been the Swan Song for the Music Industry as We Know It. but Does Anybody Care?
Byline: Lorraine Ali and David Gates At last week's Grammy Awards in L.A., they shut down the bars and Budweiser stands during the televised part of the ceremony to try to keep bodies in the seats. But by the climactic moment, the presentation of...
Money Notes: The
CREDIT CARDS Cafeterias Go Plastic (We Don't Mean Food) The quickest way to lose money? Las Vegas, of course. But parents face similar odds every morning when they stuff some lunch money into their kids' pockets before sending them off to school....
Newsmakers
Byline: Peter Plagens and Marc Peyser Jordan Shows His Age It looks like Michael Jordan may be human after all. Jordan's latest comeback--this time with the Washington Wizards--stalled last week when he underwent arthroscopic surgery on his right...
'OLD' ECONOMY SAVES THE 'NEW': How Washing Machines and Microwaves Made Up for Fiber-Optic Flops and Dot-Com Disasters
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson If this recession has now ended--as most economists, including Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan, apparently think--then there will be a supreme irony in its passing. What has transfixed Americans these past few...
Periscope
Byline: Steven Brill; T. Trent Gegax; Mary Carmichael; Michael E. Ryan; Lorraine Ali; Katherine Stroup For 9-11 Families, More Money on the Way This week Kenneth Feinberg, who runs the fund set up by Congress to compensate the next of kin of...
Perspectives
"I was frustrated at the lack of care she was receiving." Best friend Debbie Holmes, testifying that she began documenting her concerns about Andrea Yates's health care "I'm very upset. I [had hoped] to leave that thing behind me and get on with...
Risk-Free Babies: The Mother Is Destined for Early Alzheimer's. Gene Tests Brought Her a Child Who Is Not. What's Next?
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley and Karen Springen The patient is in the bloom of her early 30s, blessed by good health and cursed by a bleak future. Thanks to a rare genetic mutation--a single misplaced nucleotide among the billions that constitute a chromosome--she...
Small Stocks Think Big: Shares of Little Companies Have Been the Bear Market's Lone Bright Spot. but Good Deals Are Getting Hard to Find, and Big Funds May Not Be the Best Bet
Byline: Linda Stern In the market these days, small is beautiful. Managers of the fledgling Aegis Value Fund, which specializes in small stocks, can barely keep up with all the money investors are throwing at them. Aegis is popular for good reason:...
Stupid Network Tricks: David Letterman Eyes ABC, Setting off a Fight for 'Nightline' and the Soul of a Venerable News Division
Byline: David France and Mark Hosenball David Letterman has the itch again. After nine years of riffing on his bosses at CBS, "The Late Show" host has been quietly negotiating to relocate his home office to ABC. So quietly, in fact, that few people...
The Customer Is Always Wrong: Music and Film Moguls, and a Few Senators, Think Fans Are Thieves-And Want to Cripple Technology to Stop You from Making Copies
Byline: Steven Levy There was something decidedly Enronesque about the hearing last week before the Senate Commerce Committee. No potential illegalities, mind you. But you had Disney CEO Michael Eisner and News Corp. president Peter Chernin speaking...
'The Grievance of All Grievances': Exclusive: Facing His Toughest Election, Mugabe Hotly Denounces Zimbabwe's White Landowners
Byline: Tom Masland and Newton Kanhema His Press Secretary tried to cut off the interview, but Robert Mugabe would not be silenced. Back home in Harare after a campaign swing last week, the 78-year-old President seemed tired and touchy--and fed...
The Lessons of Abner Louima: Despite the Reversed Cop Convictions, His Case Brought Progress in the Battle against Police Brutality. Let's Hope It Lasts
Byline: Ellis Cose The trials of those charged with torturing Abner Louima were only in a narrow sense about innocence and guilt. From the moment the awful facts came to light in August 1997, it was clear that there was plenty of guilt and precious...
The Man Behind a Beautiful Mind: The Real John Nash Never Saw Visions, and after 1970 He Never Took Medication. but His Love Affair with Alicia, He Says, Is 'Just like a Movie.'
Byline: Sylvia Nasar Since "A Beautiful Mind" opened, people who loved the movie but know that it is a fictionalized version of my 1998 biography of Nobel laureate John Nash have been asking me about the real Nash: How sick was he? How did he recover?...
The Missing Week: In the Pearl Case, Pakistan's Spies Knew More Than They Let on, Which Means Musharraf Has a Problem
Byline: Ron Moreau and Zahid Hussain Sometimes it seems like the only person telling the truth in the Daniel Pearl case is the man accused of kidnapping The Wall Street Journal reporter. After turning himself in on Feb. 5, Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh,...
The Schizophrenic Mind: A Popular Movie and a Murder Trial Bring This Tragic Disease to Light. How Can the Voices Sound So Real?
Byline: Sharon Begley The first time Chris Coles heard the voice, it spoke to him after midnight. In a gentle tone, it instructed him to meet his friend at a beach cove, right then, and apologize: Chris, the voice told him, had been planning to...
Two(?)-Party Politics Today: New York's Gubernatorial Contest Is Complex, but It Is Not Exactly a Clash of Doctrines
Byline: George F. Will This is going to make your head hurt, but persevere. The complexities of the contest for governor of New York give a glimpse into what politics becomes when a vacuum of ideas is filled with race and pork. Time was, until...