Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 23

A War We Can Afford
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson A possible war with Iraq raises many unknowns, but "can we afford it?" is not one of them. People inevitably ask that question, forgetting that the United States has become so wealthy it can wage war almost with pocket...
Beyond the Lab in Biotech: With So Many Drugs in Trial, New Jobs Are Opening Up
Byline: Mary Carmichael Biotechnology stocks have slumped all year. Several vaunted experimental drugs--Provenge, Bexxar, ImClone's infamous Erbitux--have failed in clinical trials or FDA tests. BioWorld Financial Watch editor Randall Osborne says...
Be Your Own Master: Who Hasn't Thought about Walking Away from That Regular Paycheck-And All the Corporate Baggage That Comes with It? Technology Has Made Taking the Leap Easier Than Ever
Byline: David Noonan The dot-com boom is deader than disco, but the entrepreneurial spirit that drove it is alive and well. Half-baked Internet schemes don't cut it anymore--you'll need more than a catchy domain name this time round--but the Net...
Big Future in Tiny Spaces: Nanotechnology Is Moving from Labs to Businesses
Byline: Karen Breslau It may not be welcome news in her home state of Pennsylvania, but chemist Cynthia Kuper could help make steel obsolete. Experimenting with carbon nanotubes, structures a few atoms wide but 100 times stronger and much lighter...
Brave New Job Hunt: A Tech Job? That Can Mean Detective Work or Horse Farming Now, and Demands for Skills beyond Understanding Bytes
Byline: Daniel McGinn There was a time when Andy Sipowicz, hero of "NYPD Blue," made the perfect cop. He's tough, street-smart and knows how to squeeze a perp till he squeals. But old-school Andy lacks a skill that may soon be a prerequisite for...
Bright Light, Big Industry: Solar Firms Are Creating Lots of New Applications
Byline: Fred Guterl Helen Nez Sage, grandmother of 10, convinced John Ragan he had made the right career move. Sage lives in a Hogan, a traditional Navajo dwelling, in a remote part of northwestern Arizona out of reach of the electricity grid. Every...
Fashion's Freshman Face: Esteban Cortazar's Designs Hit New York City Runways This Week. but First He Has to Finish His Algebra Homework
Byline: Susannah Meadows Like a lot of high-school boys, Esteban Cortazar keeps pictures of pretty girls in his notebook. But unlike most, the 18-year-old junior at Miami's Design and Architecture Senior High moons over Giselle and J. Lo because...
Feeling Lucky, Punk? the Music Industry's in a Slump, but Vagrant Records Is on the Rise with Rock for Teens Bored by Britney
Byline: Bret Begun You can't run a record label without being a bit of a rock star yourself, and Rich Egan is playing the part. It's 11 a.m. and Egan, whose Vagrant Records could be incubating the next Nirvana, has overslept his NEWSWEEK interview....
Fields of Dreams: There Are Still Plenty of Opportunities in Technology-If You Know Where to Look, and If You Prepare Yourself with the Skills to Meet the Shifting Demands of the Workplace. A Guide to the Hot Jobs of the Future
Byline: Daniel McGinn Geoffrey Hunt does a lousy impression of Mr. McGuire, the character in "The Graduate" who doles out cinema's most famous piece of career counsel ("Just one word... 'Plastics' "). But after 22 years at Osram Sylvania, the lighting...
Five Rules for the Post-Boom
Byline: Neal Lenarsky Back in the boom days of the 1990s, when there were many more job openings than people to fill them, a senior executive from a major corporation lamented that he'd just lost the chance to hire a talented marketing candidate...
Gray Market for Gadgets: Technologies to Help the Elderly Live on Their Own
Byline: Joan Raymond For a guy who knows the software guts of a Tomahawk missile, programming a hand-held should be a no-brainer. But Don Patterson, a 30-year-old former Navy lieutenant and a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Washington, has...
How Saddam Happened: America Helped Make a Monster. What to Do with Him-And What Happens after He's Gone-Has Haunted Us for a Quarter Century
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Evan Thomas The last time Donald Rumsfeld saw Saddam Hussein, he gave him a cordial handshake. The date was almost 20 years ago, Dec. 20, 1983; an official Iraqi television crew recorded the historic moment. The once...
Letters: September 11 Remembered
There may never be adequate words to describe the events of September 11, but our readers' thoughts about the tragedies, and the year that has followed, proved that there remains much to say. "I didn't lose anyone that day in September," said one reader,...
Money: Is Your Boss Honest?
Publisher correction: 02 Oct 2002 Clarification: In the Sept. 23 Tip Sheet article "Is Your Boss Honest?" we said that Barbara Ley Toffler, an ethics expert, was hired away from Harvard Business School in 1995 to work for Arthur Andersen. In fact,...
My Sources Are Better Than Yours
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Tamara Lipper The historical rivalry between the CIA and the Pentagon's military spy agencies has erupted into bureaucratic guerrilla warfare over intelligence purportedly linking Saddam Hussein to Al Qaeda. The latest...
Newsmakers
Byline: Allison Samuels He is superman, after all. So it shouldn't surprise anybody that Christopher Reeve has defied the odds again. Last week one of Reeve's rehab doctors, John W. McDonald, reported in a scientific journal that after years of...
Our Man in Toronto: NEWSWEEK's Movie Critic Heads North for a Festival Where Hollywood Glamour and World Politics Collide
Byline: David Ansen The Toronto Film Festival has gained a reputation as not only one of the largest and most important in the world, but as one of the most friendly, hassle-free and egalitarian. Still, the waters got briefly choppy last week at...
Perspectives
"Life is short, and there is no time for hate." Sandy Dahl, the wife of United Flight 93 pilot Jason Dahl, speaking at Shanksville, Pa.'s September 11 memorial site "The Western world is... looked upon as being arrogant, self-satisfied, greedy and...
Picking Up Terror's Trail: From Buffalo to Karachi, America Made Progress in the Other War with Two Collars That May Shed New Light on Al Qaeda
Byline: Daniel Klaidman and Michael Isikoff The terrorists didn't give up without a fight. When intelligence agents in Karachi, Pakistan, cornered a group of Qaeda operatives in an apartment building last Wednesday, the suspects opened fire, setting...
Selling the World on War: Bush Rallied the U.N. to Take on Iraq. How He Got There-And What's Ahead
Byline: Tamara Lipper, Martha Brant and Michael Hirsh The U.N. General Assembly is not a place where a Texas straight shooter, a man who cherishes his freedom of action, especially wants to be making his case. Often ridiculed in Washington, the...
Software: The Eminence Geek
Byline: Steven Levy The people most identified with the software giant Microsoft are, of course, Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer. The third is up for grabs, but to hard-core nerds it may well be Charles Simonyi, the 54-year-old Hungarian-born computer...
Strong as the Gusting Wind
Byline: Anna Quindlen The wind was strong, strong as a riptide, so that it pushed and pulled, a powerful capricious current. In the pit where the buildings had stood it whipped up the dust, so that from above the area appeared to be wreathed in...
Surviving a Dot-Bomb: My First Dot-Com Flamed out. but I Still like the Start-Up Game
Byline: Randy Fish My dot-com saga started in a Stanford dorm room in 1997. I was a 19-year-old sophomore when three of my fellow classmates started Getfit.com, which was basically an online personal trainer. The Web site took people's physical...
Talk about Alligator Alley: The Primary Was a Fiasco, and Family Trouble Hit the Headlines. What Jeb Bush's Troubles Say about 2002
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores and Howard Fineman As weeks go in a governor's life, this last one was especially dismal for Jeb Bush--even by the bleak standards of Florida. First, police disclosed that his daughter, Noelle--in drug rehab in Orlando...
The Baghdad I Knew: Iraqi-Americans Want Saddam Toppled, Too. but Not If It Means More Pain for Their Loved Ones. A Daughter's Lament
Byline: Lorraine Ali It was like a scene from "My Big Fat Greek Wedding," except with Arabs. Dozens of my dark-eyed relations were gathered in my uncle Ibrahim's front yard to celebrate yet another Ali marriage. They skewer-cooked fish, argued politics...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker It was an emotionally wrenching week across the country, but particularly in New York. For NEWSWEEK, it began with a luncheon we hosted with Lally Weymouth to commemorate the anniversary of September 11. With Gov. George Pataki,...
The Ultimate Job: Security: The War on Terror Creates a Big Need for Biometrics
Byline: Brad Stone Kim Browder was certain that she wanted to pursue a high-tech career. Then the 22-year-old senior at West Virginia University started learning more about biometrics, the field of identifying people by their unique physical characteristics...
Washington's History Test
Byline: Jonathan Alter All people in public life carry around certain historical narratives in their heads. The two most powerful nowadays in the Iraq debate are World War II and the cold war. Winston Churchill fans say that Saddam Hussein is a...
What's in a Name? A Legacy of Slavery. I Met a Woman Whose Ancestors May Have Been Owned by Mine, and Confronted My Family's Past
Byline: Dewitt Hamilton I was in the car when I heard the radio announcer say the fifth person to call in would win two tickets to a gospel concert of a singer named Tillery in Carrboro, N.C. My ears perked up when I heard "Tillery" because that's...