Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 9

A New Life for the Monsters of Rock: After Six Years, Metallica Is Back. What Took So Long? Rehab, Bickering, a Fan Revolt. the Usual
Byline: Devin Gordon On the day in September 2001 that James Hetfield was released from rehab for alcohol abuse, the Metallica singer spoke on the phone with drummer Lars Ulrich, who'd helped him launch the band 20 years before. The conversation...
Arnold at the Crossroads.Which Way to Go?
Byline: Karen Breslau, Sean M. Smith PRO: Although ticket sales for his movies have flagged in the United States, he's still a powerful draw overseas. Since 1990, Arnold Schwarzenegger's films have grossed more than $1.4 billion in foreign markets...
Arnold Reloaded: Schwarzenegger's 'Terminator 3' Could Make Him an Action Hero Again. but If He Wants to Be Governor, He'll Need a Great Campaign Ad. NEWSWEEK Has Some Ideas
Byline: Jerry Adler In all the ways that count in Hollywood--money, basically--he's 10 times the star Ronald Reagan ever was, and he's 10 times more handsome than Jesse Ventura, so Arnold Schwarzenegger has to be considered a good bet to be the...
Bad Medicine for Medicare
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Whenever you hear the president talk about "reforming" a social program, that's not his real thought. "Reform" is a code word for slicing public benefits and Medicare's are no exception. Bush has proposed that Medicare...
Flushed from the Woods: A Lucky Break Ends a Seven-Year Manhunt
Byline: Michael Isikoff Officer Jeff Postell, a 21-year-old rookie cop in remote Murphy, N.C., was working the graveyard shift early Saturday morning when he spotted what seemed to be a homeless man crouched in the darkness behind the Sav-A-Lot...
Gephardt, on Schedule: From Iowa through Wisconsin, the Schedule of Early Nominating Events-Probably the Only One That Will Matter-Favors Him
Byline: George F. Will The political market is working. the democrat who would be the most formidable candidate against President Bush, and who is the most plausible president in the Democratic field, is thriving. By being a prime mover of the...
Good Fences Make. the Wall Is Only One of the Things Raising Doubts about the Neighborly Intentions of Israelis and Palestinians
Byline: Joshua Hammer On a brush-covered hilltop a few miles north of Jerusalem, Shuki Sat gazes through a freak dust storm toward the Palestinian village of Burqa, contemplating his murky future. Last year, together with his wife and daughter,...
Grrl Power, Kiwi Style: A Sweet-Smart New Film That's Been Dazzling Hard-to-Please Festival Crowds-With an Age-Old Underdog Tale
Byline: David Ansen Niki Caro's "Whale Rider," a huge hit in her native New Zealand, has been making the rounds of film festivals since last fall, and everywhere it plays it strikes a deep chord. In Toronto, in Rotterdam and at Sundance, it was...
History: The Other Bus Boycott
Byline: Lara Updike Columbus wasn't the first to find America. Clinton wasn't the first to woo an intern. Turns out Martin Luther King Jr. also had a predecessor when it came to boycotting buses. In 1953 the Rev. T. J. Jemison organized a bus boycott...
Money: Tax Cut: Get It Fast
Byline: Linda Stern Policy, schmolicy. So what if some critics think President George W. Bush's $318 billion tax cut is a deficit-swelling accounting gimmick? Here's the question for today: what's in it for me? It starts with $400-per-child refund...
My Turn: Music This Beautiful Is Something to Share: Thousands of Black Children Will Grow Up without Ever Hearing Beethoven-Unless I Get to Them First
Byline: Leo Harris In 1926, when I was 6 years old, I moved from Kansas City, Mo., to Chicago to live with my aunt and uncle. Until then the only radio I had ever seen was my older brother's crystal set with its accompanying earphones. Now I was...
Newsmakers
Byline: Kate Stroup Culture Vulture Jerry Springer says his mother would be proud: "I finally got some culture." Not only has daytime TV's sleazemeister become a real, legit movie actor, but he's also the subject of a real, legit opera. At London's...
(Over)selling the World on War: The Message Was Plain: Saddam's Weapons of Mass Destruction Made War Unavoidable. So Where Are They? Inside the Administration's Civil War over Intel
Byline: Evan Thomas, Richard Wolffe and Michael Isikoff George Tenet, the director of Central Intelligence, was frustrated. For four days and nights last winter, some of the most astute intelligence analysts in the U.S. government sat around Tenet's...
Page-Turner: A Stolen 'Da Vinci'-Or Just Weirdness? It's a Real-Life Mystery
Byline: Seth Mnookin Clive Cussler blurbed Lewis Perdue's novel "Daughter of God," published in 2000, as "A read you won't soon forget." Perdue, the author of more than a dozen novels, thinks Dan Brown remembered it all too well--and that Brown's...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: New York Times, New York Post, Boston Globe, New York Times (2), Vanity Fair, New York Post, Associated Press, Reuters "What is happening is occupation." Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, to members...
Scaring the Ayatollahs: Is Washington Now Aiming for 'Regime Change' in Iran?
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Maziar Bahari When the Ayatollah Khomeini decided at last to end his long and bloody war with Iraq in 1988, he did so as reluctantly, he said, as if he were drinking from a chalice of poison. Today his successor, the...
Sideline Arafat, Boost Abbas
Byline: Fareed Zakaria If nothing else, this week's Middle East summits will produce a great many photographs of smiling leaders. But to understand how long and hard the road to peace is, consider the photograph that you have not seen. Last Thursday...
Terrorism: Continuing Threats
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff Washington may have reduced the domestic terrorist-alert level to yellow from orange but that doesn't mean the threat of a terrorist attack has greatly receded recently. Officials tell NEWSWEEK that U.S....
Testing, Testing: Found a Company That's Hiring? Prepare Yourself for More Quizzes Than You Had in High-School Math
Byline: Daniel McGinn Four guys sit in a library conference room, passing a bag of Krispy Kremes and taking turns at the chalkboard. "Name the three basic numbering systems used by modern computers," one man orders another. Another fellow fills...
'The Capacity Is There': A Conservative Bioethicist Argues on Behalf of the Embryo
Byline: Debra Rosenberg Hadley Arkes is the author of "Natural Rights and the Right to Choose" and is a fellow in Princeton University's politics department. He has testified before Congress on behalf of anti-abortion legislation. Excerpts from...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Laci Peterson's body had just been found, and Debra Rosenberg found herself at a dinner party arguing about fetal rights. Along with the remains of the Modesto housewife, authorities also discovered the disconnected fetus of...
The War over Fetal Rights: The Politics of the Womb Are Becoming Ever More Personal-And Complex. the Peterson Murder Case, Changing State Laws and Startling New Science Are Causing Many Americans to Rethink Long-Held Beliefs
Publisher clarification: 25 June 2003 In our June 9 article "The War Over Fetal Rights" (June 9) a caption accompanying the photo of a 13-week-old fetus stated that from that point on, states could restrict a woman's right to an abortion. We should...
Treating the Tiniest Patients: Dramatic Advances in Fetal Medicine-Especially in Utero Surgery-Have Changed What We Know and How We Think about the Unborn
Byline: Claudia Kalb Samuel Armas, a chattering, brown-eyed 3-year-old, has no idea what "fetus" means. Nor does he realize that he was one of the most celebrated in medical history. At a mere 21 weeks of gestational age--long before it was time...
Troops: The Body Count Grows
Byline: Scott Johnson When president George W. Bush declared on May 2 that major combat operations in Iraq had concluded, he stopped short of saying the war was over. And with good reason. Since then U.S. and British soldiers have been dying at...
Two Gorillas Make Nice: A Lawsuit Settled, Microsoft and AOL Move Forward
Byline: Steven Levy Last week the technology elite gathered in Carlsbad, Calif., for a Wall Street Journal technology conference. Nobody gave it a second thought that some of the Microsoft people seemed to be hanging around folks from America Online...
'When Can It Feel Pain?': For This Philosopher, 'Viability' Makes the Moral Difference
Byline: Debra Rosenberg Bonnie Steinbock has written several books on medical ethics, including "Life Before Birth: The Moral and Legal Status of Embryos and Fetuses." She is chair of philosophy at SUNY Albany. She spoke with NEWSWEEK's Debra Rosenberg....