Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 1

After the U. N.'s Own 9/11 Crisis: A Friend Remembers Vieira De Mello-And Offers a Plan for the U.N.'S Future in Iraq
Byline: Richard C. Holbrooke The flags of the nations were gone from their familiar flagpoles in front of United Nations headquarters last week. Only a single banner--the pale blue of the United Nations--flew on First Avenue, at half-mast, of course,...
Another Party Gets Started with Pink
Byline: Lorraine Ali Pink examines her face in the rearview mirror and tries to wipe off a layer or two of the makeup from a recent photo shoot. "God, I look like a drag queen," she says in a sandpaper voice that makes her sound like a waffle-house...
Another Side of the August Ms. Morrison
Byline: David Gates Knowing Toni Morrison only from her magisterial public demeanor, and then entering this Pantheon-domed apartment palace in Manhattan, you expect Jeeves to open the door and administer some pre-intimidation before ushering you...
Back-to-School Guide: It's Official. Recess Is over. Time to Trade in Your Beach Balls for Book Bags. Hey, No Crying!
Summer may be ending, but at least it's an excuse to shop. Tip Sheet combed the hallways and mallways for this year's best gear--from high-tech laptops to high-design notebooks. Whether you're a first grader or a college freshman, here's all you need...
Countdown to Mayhem; the Members of the U.N. Staff in Baghdad Knew They Were Risking Their Lives, but They Believed They Were Doing the Right Thing. That Gave Them No Protection. the Story of the Attack through Their Eyes
Byline: Joshua Hammer with Colin Soloway in Baghdad United Nations headquarters in Baghdad was bustling as usual late last Tuesday afternoon. Upstairs in his spacious third-floor office, Special Envoy Sergio Vieira de Mello leaned forward on his...
Does Indexing Still Work? the Question Raised by the Bear Is Whether to Buy and Always Hold. in Any Frenzy It's Smart to Sell and Put Some Profits in Your Purse
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn The results are in. Index mutual funds behave no better, but no worse, than any other mutual fund when the market falls. Money managers like to say that index investing fails when stocks decline. Supposedly you go down...
Fast Forward: A SNEAK PEAK AHEAD: There's No Way to Do Justice to the Bounty of Fall and Winter-Without Saying Virtually Nothing about Virtually Everything. So We Dug in Deep on the Four People and Projects That Intrigue Us Most
Byline: Jeff Giles The other day, Nicole Kidman went to the movies, and the coming attractions freaked her out a little. The trailer for Julia Roberts's December film, "Mona Lisa Smile," among others. It just looked so... good. Like something people...
Grooming: Uno, Due, Tre. Quattro?
Byline: Daniel McGinn Few men hop out of bed each morning and say: "Oh, goody, I get to shave today!" But this month brings a rare bit of excitement to male grooming: the new Schick Quattro, the first-ever four-blade razor. The Quattro will seek...
Groping in the Dark: The Public Posture Is Confident, but the Jitters Are Real. under Fire in Iraq, Team Bush Ponders Its Options
Byline: Evan Thomas Iraq may be spinning out of control, but in the Bush administration, the spin was strictly controlled. From Baghdad to the White House, administration spokesmen went to elaborate lengths to argue that the presence of terrorists...
In California, All Politics Are National
Byline: Karen Breslau Who needs New Hampshire? With Arnold Schwarzenegger getting more attention than any presidential candidate, the battle for the California governorship is starting to play out like a preview of next year's presidential race....
Newsmakers
Byline: Sean Smith and Jennifer Ordonez Now, That's What We Call Oral History If you're older than 50, you probably remember when you saw "Deep Throat." The 1972 film is not only the most famous porn flick to date, but the most profitable movie...
Nukes and Crime: China's Borderline Troubles
Byline: Cortlan Bennett and Melinda Liu China's patience with North Korea is wearing thin. The trouble isn't only Pyongyang's crash program to create a nuclear arsenal--although that's caused plenty of sleepless nights in Beijing. Thanks largely...
Of the Mr. Clean Named Mr. Sheen
Byline: Sean Smith He's afraid it's still in there. Yesterday, a bug crash-landed in Charlie Sheen's ear, and after trying to dig it out, then flush it out, he's pretty sure it's dead, but he's not sure it's, you know, gone. So now he's sitting...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: New York Times, Playboy, Associated Press (2), Salt Lake Tribune, New York Times, AP, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, AP (2), Minneapolis Star-Tribune "The end of the Roadmap is a cliff." Secretary of State...
Restoration at 346 Madison: In 1956 Brooks Brothers' President Said, 'Whenever We Conteplate Changing Anything around Here, a Perceptible Shudder Goes through the Store'
Byline: George F. Will This man now--surely he came from that heavenly world, that divine position at the center of things where choice is unlimited. --MARY McCARTHY, "The Man in the Brooks Brothers Shirt" (1941) Some business stories are...
Roy Moore's Holy War: The 'Ten Commandments Judge' Always Loves a Fight
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores Chief Justice Roy Moore of the Alabama Supreme Court remains defiant even in defeat. For the past year he's fought a lawsuit seeking the removal of a two-ton Ten Commandments monument that he sneaked into the Alabama Judicial...
Stop! Do Not Turn the Page! There's Death, There's Taxes and There's Standardized Tests. Colleges Say They Need the SAT and ACT to Weigh Applicants Fairly. How Should Students Prepare?
Byline: Linda Stern What should you do with that No. 2 pencil: (a) keep it sharpened; (b) use it to take several life-altering tests during a harrowing year of your young life; (c) chew it to bits while waiting to see if your scores help you get...
Tangled Up in His Flight Suit: For Bush, War Equals Good Politics-So Long as the War's Going Well, That Is
Byline: Howard Fineman George W. Bush was raising money last week in the Pacific Northwest, where there are too many greens, Democrats and anti-everything activists to suit him. "Do you have all those protesters lined up to see me?" he jokingly...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Jon Meacham Late last Tuesday afternoon, Joshua Hammer had just returned to our bureau in Baghdad from a visit to a power plant--he had been reporting on Iraq's electrical problems--when the telephone rang. "I think a bomb just went off...
The Hot Schools of 2004: Competition Is Tough, but There Are Hundreds of Great Colleges out There. Here's a Dandy Dozen We Think You Should Consider
Byline: Mary Carmichael and Karen Springen Every year, high-school seniors undergo two rituals. One is picking a college. The second is ranking their classmates for the yearbook: Most Outgoing, Most Athletic, Best All-Around. Choosing an undergraduate...
The New College Game: Telltale Essays, Long Wait Lists, 'Mutual Massage'-This Is the Newest Lexicon of the Process. Colleges Manipulate Admissions. Now Students Are Learning to Fight Back
Byline: Jay Mathews In the college-admission season just past, Ben Weinberg was one of the hot prospects--1430 SAT, A-minus average at a very competitive private school, jazz pianist, tennis player and future biomedical researcher. Those "you are...
Tuition: Why It Costs So Much: Tough Times Hurt Funding, but Schools Keep Spending
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores In July 2002, just one month before she was to start her sophomore year at Penn State, Midori Valdivia received a shocking piece of mail: the bursar's bill. Her tuition had increased 14 percent, to $4,004 per semester....
We're Fighting Terror, but Killing Freedom: Are the Rights of My Arab and Muslim Clients Really Expendable? Only If We're Ready to Give Up Our Own
Byline: Randall Hamud In the last 23 months I've received countless threats accusing me of being a terrorist, but this one caught my attention because it was in Spanish. "Te vas a morir!" the voice on my answering machine said. "You're going to...
What We Should Do Now: Washington's Plan A Clearly Isn't Working. the Fighting Is Far from over in Iraq. but There's No Walking Away. the Administration Needs to Have a Clear, Long-Term Commitment, the Backing of the United Nations and More Than a Little Help from Its Friends
Byline: Fareed Zakaria There is a danger of over-reacting to last week's gruesome bombing of the United Nations' headquarters in Baghdad. The United States has been in Iraq for only four months and much of the country is stable. The northern lands,...