Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 130, No. 2, July 14

A House Divided: The Episcopal Church Struggles over Gay Marriage, Adulterous Clergy and Its Own Identity
WITH THEIR ANGLICAN HABITS OF civility, moderation and tolerance, Episcopalians have for 200 years managed to avoid the ruptures that have plagued other Protestant denominations. Despite its image as a dub, the Protestant Episcopal Church has always...
A Rebel in the Ranks: A Blunt Marine Roils the Pentagon's Hunt for a Chief
A blunt marine roils the Pentagon's hunt for a chief JACK SHEEHAN DIDN'T hold his tongue. Last summer the four-star marine general was invited to a closed-door conference at the Aspen Institute, a plush think tank nestled in the Rocky Mountains....
Begging for Bosses: There May Be Inflation out There - in Management Pay. Call It the Revenge of the Downsized
DOUG KELLAM HAD HEARD ALL the stories. So when he was laid off from his job as a marketing manager at a beverage company in January, Kellam saw only worn shoe leather in his future. HE expected a yearlong, painful trek through the corporate offices...
Beijing's New Babysitter: The United States Has Put China on Notice. Washington Intends to Stand Guard over Hong Kong
THERE WERE TWO HANDOVERS in Hong Kong last week. Beijing took power over the British colony--and Washington took over as its chief protector. "You've got to keep watching," British Gov. Chris Patten told Secretary of State Madeleine Albright before...
Bill's Eye on the Eye? A Microsoft Bid for CBS Isn't Likely, But
A Microsoft bid for CBS isn't likely, but... THERE'S ABSOLUTELY NO TRUTH TO it." "It's not happening." "There's no deal. No one's looking at a deal." So declared the various spokespersons for Microsoft, CBS and its parent, Westinghouse Electric,...
Clinton's Tax Problem: Unless the President Wakes Up, the Rich Will Pocket Most of the First Tax Cut since Reagan
WE'RE TOLD THAT Washington is Dullsville--out of touch with what Americans really care about. But Americans really care about money--who gets how much--and in the next couple of weeks they'll get their first tax cut in 16 years. So put down the lotion...
'Don't Show Weakness:' Black Americans Still Shy Away from Psychotherapy
DR. ALVIN POUSSAINT remembers clearly a visit to the housing project s of Boston in the late 1960s. A public-health nurse had directed him to a woman in need of help. When he identified himself as a psychiatrist, says Poussaint, who is black, the woman...
Ear Today, but Gone Tomorrow
It was the bite heard round the world, a repellent act that again raised disturbing questions about the state of Mike Tyson--and boxing WHEN MIKE TYSON REACHED HIS dressing room after his shameful exit from the championship fight against Evander...
Greetings from Mars: The Remarkably Clever - and Cheap - Pathfinder Mission Inaugurates a New Era in Space Epxloration
For six and half long hours mission controllers had been sitting anxiously with their eyes fixed on a single desktop terminal, sscanning the computer screen for interplanetary e-mail. Suddenly, just about the time that the towns near the Jet Propulsion...
I Have Breast Cancer: Yes, Men as Well as Women Can Get - and Survive - This Terrible Disease
Yes, men as well as women can get--and survive--this terrible disease FARLY IN AUGUST OF '96, I NOTICED A SMALL LUMP under my left nipple. I wasn't too concerned--I assumed it was a cyst that would go away on its own. About three weeks later, I...
It's a Wonderful Legacy: Two of Stewart's Classic Characters Helped Change How We View Our Politics - and Ourselves
Two of Stewart's classic characters helped change how we view our politics--and ourselves WHEN "MR. SMITH Goes to Washington" premi6red in the capital, in 1939, about a third of the audience of dignitaries stormed out. "Not all senators are sons...
Now, the Role of a Lifetime
Fred Thompson has always had something to prove. This week he faces his toughest case: cracking Clinton's Asia Connection. IN 1959, IN LAWRENCEBURG, TENN., Fred Thompson and Sarah Lindsey had a problem. He was 16: a strapping athlete, not much of...
Out of the Shadows: Robert Mitchum, 1917-1997
Robert Mitchum, 1917-1997 WHEN DIRECTOK JIM Jarmusch heard about Jimmy Stewart's death on July 2, he had a mean thought. "Robert Mitchum," he said to himself, "overshadowed again." In death, Mitchtun was supposed to get the kind of respect the world...
Rethinking the Korean War
A moderate challenge to China's party line on the conflict could foreshadow a major foreign-policy shift--and better relations with Washington NORTH KOREAN STRONGMAN Kim Il Sung arrived in Beijing on May 13, 1950, on a top-secret mission he hoped...
Selling a Little Net Music: Online CD Sales Sound Sweet, but Start off Slow and Stately
Online CD sales sound sweet, but start off slow and stately PITY THE POOR TEENAGER behind the cash register this summer. It's not enough that his job is tedious and low-paying. Now he's the whipping boy in a new digital hype campaign. When retailers...
Sell It While It's Hot. Collect It When It's Not
REMEMBER PEZ--THAT oblong, tabletlike candy? Surely you're familiar with the dispensers they're sold in: plastic sleeves crowned with decorative, spring-loaded-tops. Just flip back Mickey Mouse's head, or the top of whichever version you've got, and...
South toward Home: Facing Long Odds - and Painful History - Blacks Are at Last Moving Back to the Old Confederacy
OFFICIAL SLAVERY HAD BEEN abolished 60 years earlier. But to the sharecropper family into which Bennie Rayford was born in 1926, that distinction barely mattered. No black child in his part of Mississippi could set foot in the schoolhouse until all...
The All American Hero
James Stewart, 1908-1997 THE STORY GOES THAT when the news first hit Hollywood of Ronald Reagan's ambitions to be president, Jack Warner, the legendarily blunt mogul, responded, "No. Jimmy Stewart for president, Ronald Reagan for best friend." ...
The City on a Hill
WHAT HAPPENED LAST WEEK WAS ONCE UNIMAGINABLE. As a young correspondent for NEWSWEEK in the mid-1960s, I had covered Hong Kong's darkest days. China's Cultural Revolution--fomented by revolutionaries waving Mao's Little Red Book--spilled across the...
The End of the Road: Charles Kuralt, Tell of Stores, 1934-1997
Charles Kuralt, teller of stories (1934-1997) ON A BITTER JANUARY MORNING in 1974, Charles Kuralt and his CBS crew were setting up on a remote illtop west of Dubuque, Iowa. They were there to do an "On the Road" segment on farmer Bill Bodisch, who...
Wannabes
The Spice Girls are the biggest British export since the Beatles, and they've spawned a slew of Shameless imitators. Meet some of the other Spices in the rack. YOU THINK WE'VE gone mad. Why are we running four huge pictures of the same people in...
Where the Books Are: Both Britain and France Build Massive Monuments to Culture
THEY ARE WHAT ANGKOR WAT IS TO Cambodia, or Disney World to America: the very souls of their countries, rendered in glass, wood and brick. In Paris, the Bibliotheque Nationale de France--four towers at the comers of a vast plaza--opened last winter...