Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 131, No. 7, February 16

A Magnate Who Gave Us Monica
Walter Kaye used to tell friends that meeting Hillary Clinton changed his life. The 78-year-old insurance tycoon settled into a deep gloom after he retired from his New York brokerage firm in the 1990s. When he saw the First Lady give a speech several...
A Question of Fair Play: Professional Golf's Must-Walk Rule Should Be Lifted Altogether and Carts Made the Standard
The World of professional golf, a game of pastels and putts, prodigious drives and big bucks has had its sanguine inner circle rocked by a young man with a swing as poetic as Sam Snead's and a putting touch as buttery as Ben Crenshaw's. No, it's not...
Battle Stations: Plans Take Shape for an Air War on Iraq, but Success May Be Elusive
Lt. Janet Jacobson is ready for battle. She is one of two female fighter pilots on the U.S. aircraft carrier Nimitz in the northern waters of the Persian Gulf. Women weren't allowed to fly m combat during the gulf war seven years ago, but that restriction...
Blood on the Snow: After a U.S. Fighter Jet Clips a Gondola's Cable, Killing 20, Europe Questions America's Character
For years the villagers of Cavalese had griped about the fighter jets that regularly roar up their Alpine river valley. Some claimed to have seen both U.S. and Italian fighter jocks "hot-dogging" by threading under cables and high-tension wires. Italian...
Books, Cooked D.C. Style: 'Saving' Social Security by Borrowing from It
Yes, Virginia, there really are stories out of Washington that don't involve Monica Lewinsky. Consider, if you will, one of the nation's most important financial questions: how to fix Social Security before baby boomers start retiring about 15 years...
Dragons on the March: The Guggenheim Brings 5,000 Years of Art from China to New York
Last October the Guggenheim museum opened a breathtaking branch in Bilbao, Spain -- and managed to get the credit while having the whole thing paid for by the Basques. Now the museum has pulled off another international spectacle that's almost as...
Festival of Youth
Despite the hyperbole of grand challenges and epic confrontations, the Olympics are really quite fleeting events. The Atlanta Games lie just 18 months distant, and nothing much of them remains beyond some exciting memories and faded T shirts. The...
From Jedidiah to Jordan: What to Name the Baby?
Agonizing over a name for your baby? A hundred years ago, you'd have had it easy. Back then, people tended to just borrow names from religious or political figures. Top girls' names at the turn of the century, for instance, were Mary -- for you-know-who...
Let's Gag All the Lawyers
In Woody Allen's new movie, "Deconstructing Harry," Billy Crystal, playing the Devil, accompanies Woody in an elevator descending into hell. Crystal explains that the lowest level is reserved for "lawyers who go on TV." The Clinton sex scandal,...
New Media's Dark Star
Matt drudge should have been the shining star of Internet journalism. He is living proof that the Net hypesters are right: armed with little else than a Web site and a work ethic, an obscure outsider can steal click-throughs and mind share from Goliaths...
Playing in a League of Their Own
A decade ago in Calgary Cammi Granato cheered from the stands as her brother Tony hit the ice for the U.S. Olympic hockey team. Inspired by the flag-waving and patriotic anthems, the teenager vowed to return to the Olympics one day as a competitor...
Share Your Shots
Thinking about buying a digital camera? Sure, your friends will be impressed when you start snapping pictures -- and showing the results immediately on a small, built-in screen. But you'll quickly notice some drawbacks. That little color LCD screen...
Spade in America: The Sarcastic New Star of 'Just Shoot Me.'(David Spade)(Interview)(Brief Article)
Before the interview, David Spade's publicist warns, "No questions about Chris Farley." But the 33-year-old comedian proves less reticent than his flack. Farley, who died last month of drug-related causes, was Spade's friend from "Saturday Night Live"...
Swimming in a Sea of Leaks
For the justice, Department, it's a nightmare scenario. Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr is accused of leaking secret grand-jury evidence to the press. The White House demands an investigation, and the job of going after Starr's team falls to Attorney...
The Eye of the Storm
Bill Clinton emerged from church on Sunday, Jan. 18, with his Bible in one hand, his wife in the other, and his mind, quite possibly, on other matters. The day before, at his secret deposition in the Paula Jones sexual-harassment case, the president...
The Gateway to the Oval Office
Every life has trademarks. Betty Currie's are emblems of welcome and faith. There is the ever-present dish of hard candy on her desk outside the Oval Office. There are her clockwork appearances at Methodist services on Sundays. She is the kind of...
The Great Leap Forward
The quad, the quad, the quad, the quad. That's all anyone seems to be talking about on the eve of the men's Olympic figure-skating competition. It's as if the quadruple jump, four full revolutions in the air, is the only move that counts. Just a few...
The King of Jumps
It wasn't entirely clear to anyone, except perhaps the judges, why Canada's Elvis Stojko wasn't awarded the Olympic gold medal in Lillehammer back in 1994. Maybe it was his unusually frenetic short program when he became the first figure skater ever...
The Man in Clinton's Shadow
Linda Tripp was trying frantically to reach Bruce Lindsey, but the president's alter ego wouldn't answer her pages. It was last July, and Tripp had just learned that Newsweek planned to write a story about her 1993 encounter with Kathleen Willey....
The Puck Starts Here
A few weeks before the Olympics, Brett Hull is sitting in a restaurant in St. Louis, not far from the Kiel Center, where he plays hockey for the Blues, and finishing his Chinese shrimp salad. He's enjoying the salad but he's got a problem, actually...