Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 131, No. 24, June 15

A Disaster in the Making
ABRAMOWITZ is a board member of the International Crisis Group and a former assistant secretary of State. Kosovo is now the most dangerous p lace in Europe. Here's what the United States and its allies must do WHEN THE LEADERS OF KOSOVO'S NEARLY 2...
Alzheimer's: Losing More Than Memory
Researchers have no good weapons against this devastating disease-but there is hope CAR KEYS ARE MISPLACED, A NAME resists moving past the tip of the tongue. Often, we respond with humor: "I must be getting Alzheimer's." But the memory loss that age...
Another Tangled Washington Web
The nation's capital is a big city, but it can sometimes seem like a small town. Consider the interlocking relationships-formal and informal-of the lawyers who are now involved in the Monica Lewinsky case. A look at the Washington legal fraternity: ...
A QUICK Fix FOR BUG 2000
MORAMARCO is professor of English at San Diego State University. By reliving the last 100 years, we can avoid the dreaded computer meltdown BY NOW EVERYONE'S HEARD OF THE MILLENNIUM BUG. You know, the fact that in the year 2000 all computers are going...
A Strange Affair
Germans are fascinated with all things Jewish. Is it contrition? LATE IN THE EVENING IN WHAT used to be a heavily Jewish section of Berlin, the Hackesches Hof Theater reverberates with the sounds of klezmer music- the Jewish folk songs of Eastern Europe....
A Touch of Magic
The sports superstar sees good works as good business. He's investing in the inner city, sparking a fierce debate about success and responsibility IN THE GYM OF THE HARRIS County Juvenile Detention Center in Houston, Earvin (Magic) Johnson removes his...
Broadway Bonanza
How to succeed in the business of theater? Master modern marketing and hit the road with state-of-the-art productions as lavish as any in New York SHAKESPEARE NO DOUBT SPENT more time counting the boxoffice receipts for "Hamlet" than he did discussing...
Dial R for Remake
A reupholstered Hitchcock tale with Michael Douglas fails to generate any true terror MICHAEL DOUGLAS, GWYNETH PALtrow and Viggo Mortensen are caught in what you would think would be a juicy emotional situation in the suspense thriller A Perfect Murder....
Don't Call Us, We'll Call You
The phone system of the future is coming someday PARENTS WITH TEEN-agers, take heart. Yes, they hog the phones. They hang out online, interminably. But hope is nigh, thanks to Sprint Corp. Its new Ion Network, unveiled last week, lets half a dozen people...
Europe's Success Story
GOLDHAGEN teaches political science at Harvard University. Germany has done more than most countries to confront its past. IMAGINE A GERMAN child in 1955,1975 or 1995 waking up one day to learn that the government, with the help of many of its people,...
Fat, Fatter: But Who's Counting?
New guidelines put the moderately overweight in the danger zone EVER SINCE THE 1950S, WHEN height-weight charts from the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. were widely distributed, Americans have been anxiously studying columns of numbers to find out whether...
Forget the Angry Voter. the Hacks Are Back
From California to Kentucky, career politicians are suddenly chic. But can their moment last? DAN LUNGREN HAD JUST LEARNED to read and ride a bike when he launched his political career. He was all of 6 years old, leafleting his neighbors in Long Beach,...
Lifts, Lasers and Liposuction: The Cosmetic Surgery Boom
HAS THE APproaching turn of the millennium touched your life at all? Cultists are preaching doom--and eagerly soliciting television interviews. Social butterflies are booking space for fin-de-siecle blowouts. Some of us, frankly, are yawning. But there...
Memory
With KAREN SPRINGEN and T. TEENT GEGAX MEMORY Forgetfulness is America's latest health obsession. How much is normal? Can we do anything about it? An explosion of new research offers reassuring insights. STAN FIELD KNOWS WHAT AGE can do to a person's...
Monica's Shake-Up
She's got new lawyers but the same problem: how much, if anything, to tell Starr about the president. The road ahead. KEN STARR WAS TAKING A night off from the Monica Wars. On May28 the independent counsel was a featured speaker at a gala in the Great...
Not Just a Diversion
We now see the cost of sweeping nuclear proliferation and human rights under the rug THE DEPARTING COLD WAR TOOK WITH IT A LOT OF excuses and rationales that the American government had been invoking reflexively for decades in the name of national security....
Now, Heeere's Earvin!
A longtime talk-show guest, Magic moves to the other side of the mike-with a little help from his friends MAGIC JOHNSON HAS lots of friends, a legacy from the 1980s when he was a Los Angeles Laker and one of the NBA's most charismatic players. A call...
Now He's the Top Dog
With ALISHA DAVIS in New York T. TRENT GREGAX in Atlanta and ANA FIGUEROA in Los Angels With a bite as big as his signature bark, rapper DMX debuts at the top of the charts A MONTH AGO, THE AVERAGE AMERI-can probably thought DMX was the name of a motorbike....
Politics of Promotion
An old ideaukeeping kids backuis hot again BRISK, CHEERFUL AND PASSIONATE about educating children, Nancy Ichinaga thinks social promotion is "junk." She should know. As principal of Bennett-Kew Elementary School, in Inglewood, Calif. for the past 23...
Read the Fine Print
The wave of bank mergers means-surprise!-fewer features and higher costs for credit cards CARDHOLDERS, GET OUT YOUR READing glasses. Bank-merger mania means the hyperactive credit-card market is getting more profit-hungry and less competitive. Citibank...
Saddam' $ Old Tricks
He continues to play hide-and-seek with the U.N. inspectors UNDER THE WATCHFUL EYES OF AN Iraqi Army officer, four United Nations weapons inspectors fanned out across a desolate patch of gravel-strewn desert north of Baghdad. The site, known as Al Nibai,...
Super Scorer: Ronaldo Rules
He plays like a runaway truck, but Brazil-and the world-knows he's soccer's Michael Jordan the best there is. RONALDO'S SHAVEN HEAD IS large, with protruding ears and a wide, gap-toothed grin. At 5 feet 10 inches and 165 pounds, the Brazilian is big...
Taking on the World
How far can the U.S. go in the World Cup beginning this week? As far as their superstopper, goalkeeper Kasey Keller, takes them. SOMEDAY, IF SOCCER CAPTIVATES America's sports fans as it does the rest of the world's, millions may claim to have been...
The Doctor Is Always On
On radio and MTV, 'Loveline' helps teens looking for practical advice on sex and relationships JEFF IS 23 AND HE's got a problem. When he went out partying with his buddies, he met a girl. She seduced him, and they had a one-night stand. Turns out she's...
The Lizard Was a Turkey
Hyping 'Godzilla' was the studio's only hope UNTIL IT OPENED, "GODZILLA" LOOKED like a monster that couldn't be stopped, the summer's likeliest smash. On the strength of Sony's huge 1997 hit "Men in Black," the studio made deals to put its green-eyed...
Watching out for the New Watchdog
Steven Brill's latest magazine project takes aim at reporters and editors: will they strike back? A FEW WEEKS AGO, NEW YORK TIMES columnist Maureen Dowd went to Steven Brill's midtown Manhattan office to interview him about his new magazine. Her column...