Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 22, November 29

A Family's Secrets Roil the Right: A Dark Trail of Deception and Suicide at a Bedrock Conservative School
To Hillsdale College, a tiny private liberal-arts school in rural Michigan, George Roche III was a kind of cult figure. Tall and charismatic, the school's president had transformed Hillsdale from a third-rate party school into one of the country's...
A Global Exclusive! OK, We Made That Up. We're in Good Company
They sift through garbage; they know the sexual habits of every politician they've ever met; they boast that they're the roughest, toughest scoop merchants in all the inky-fingered world of journalism. But now the truth can be told: at the prospect...
A Tale of Two Cities: Beijing: After More Than a Decade of Stalemated Negotiations, One Man in China Finally Risked His Career to Cement the World-Trade Deal. If the Country's Shaky Economic and Political Systems Can't Handle the Systems Can't Handle the Shock, Zhu Rongji Will Be the One Who Pays for It
The man who made it happen was nowhere to be seen. More than anyone else, it was Prime Minister Zhu Rongji who closed the deal with the United States, bringing China's 13-year campaign to join the World Trade Organization to within sight of its goal....
A Tale of Two Cities: Washington: For Bill Clinton, the World Trade Organization Agreement with China Is a Foreign-Policy Milestone, One That Could Rank as a Great Political Achievement. That Is, If He Can Prevent a Wary Congress and Angry Labor Unions from Torpedoing the Deal
It was a decidedly odd way for Bill Clinton to hear the news. At about 8 a.m. on Nov. 15, the president was stepping into the shower in his hotel bathroom in Ankara, Turkey, where he was preparing for a summit of European leaders. A whole continent...
Boris to Bill: Butt Out: Relations between Washington and Moscow Have Hit a Post-Cold-War Low over Russia's Brutal Campaign in Chechnya
Bill Clinton tried conjuring up the Boris Yeltsin of old last week, the one who eight years ago stood defiantly on a tank and saved Russia's fledgling democracy. "One of the most thrilling experiences of my life, as a citizen of the world, was when...
Call It the Drudgegate Affair: The Internet's Intrepid Reporter Finds He Can't Adapt to TV
Even as Matt Drudge became a 1990s celebrity, he never forgot his roots. After Fox News signed him up to a rich TV deal last year--to the horror of the journalistic establishment--he said: "They can always throw me back to the Internet if they have...
Economics as Statecraft: Will the Free-Market Approach We Tried in Russia Fare Better in China? Let's Hope So
We should not mistake the latest trade agreement with China--allowing it to enter the World Trade Organization--for only a trade agreement. It is much more: a calculated effort by both the United States and China to fashion the world order of the next...
Flying Wildly out of Control: 'Air Rage' Is Not Just Annoying. It Can Be Dangerous
They're called "irates"--fliers who spin out of control. Mysterious crashes and terrorism are more fundamental worries, but for the vast majority of passengers the biggest danger may be in the next seat. Industry officials are deeply concerned about...
Fooling Father Time: By Altering a Gene, Scientists Make Mice Live Longer
With the exception of the venerable Mickey, mice aren't known for longevity; their second birthday is usually their last. A new study, published by a team of Italian scientists in the journal Nature, has increased membership in the rodent golden-agers...
Living Canvas: Tattoos and Body Piercing Don't Seem as Exotic as They Once Did, but a New Exhibit Reminds Us That throughout History, They Revealed a Power and Purpose. Just as They Probably Do for Those Kids at The
Great artistic movements begin in rebellion, and end up in museums. Along the way, there is typically an inflection point, a paradigm shift when the response they elicit changes from shock and outrage to "ummm... is this the only color it comes in?"...
Perspectives
"This has hit everybody very, very hard." Tura King, a spokeswoman for Texas A&M University, after a 40-foot framework of logs, for the school's traditional bonfire, collapsed and killed at least 12 students "It's the programming equivalent...
Stress in the Skies: More Americans Than Ever Will Take to the Skies over the Thanksgiving Weekend-And It Won't Be Much Fun. How Stressed Carriers, the Rising Passenger Numbers and an Antiquated Air-Traffic-Control System Have Combined to Make Flying a Bad Trip
Over the coming four-day weekend, more than 6 million Americans will board commercial flights, a record for this typically heavy holiday. While the EgyptAir crash may continue to blanket the news, fatal crashes are the exception. Last year the death...
Wait till the 'Midnite' Hour: At Last, Beck Delivers the True Sequel to 'Odelay'
I can tell you just when and where I first heard Beck's "Loser" (1994, 3 a.m., car radio, back road in East Hartford, N.Y.) and just what I thought: who in God's name is this? Delta slide guitar, crude hip-hop drum track, a white guy rapping in a burnout's...