Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 10

Africana Goes Dot-Com: A Scholar Puts W.E.B. Du Bois, and More, Online
The internet thrives on creative self-promotion, so Prof. Henry Louis Gates Jr. is right at home. Reclining in a mesh ergonomic chair, Gates (Skip to his friends) points to several photos hanging on his office walls, casually rattling off the names...
'A Horrible Nightmare': Screams Drowned out the Music at a Pearl Jam Concert in Copenhagen, and Eight Fans Died
Rain-soaked fans pressed hard toward the stage as Pearl Jam cranked out tunes last Friday night at the Roskilde festival just outside Copenhagen. Between songs, concerned band members urged the audience to stop pushing, but thousands continued to shove...
A Little Boy Goes Home: But Is Cuba Big Enough for a 6-Year-Old Hero?
Just hours after the U.S. Supreme Court ended the long-running wrangle over his custody and immigration status, Elian Gonzalez and his family were standing on the rain-soaked tarmac of a Havana airport while several hundred flag-waving schoolkids from...
Amazon.com Talks Back: Being an E-Commerce Pioneer Is Tough Work These Days, but Jeff Bezos Is Happy to Take on His Doubters
Just last year, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos was a New Economy superstar, surfing a wave of enthusiasm for e-commerce. This year, the wave has crashed over his head. Amazon stock has dived 70 percent from its high, dropping 19 percent on a recent...
An Arctic Battlefield: Billions of Barrels of Oil Lie beneath a Pristine Wildlife Refuge. How Much Longer Can America Resist?
Surely this can't be the place that has triggered a bitter, 25-year tug of war? A treeless, mosquito-infested plain squeezed between the Arctic Ocean and Alaska's 9,000-foot Brooks Range, the strip of coast in the northeast corner of the state is a...
A Scout Passes the Torch: Gay-Rights Advocates Turn to the Court of Public Opinion
James Dale's 10-year battle to stay a Boy Scout ended last Wednesday. Dale, who camped, hiked and fished his way up the scouting ranks in a dozen years with Matawan, N.J., troops, had sued the Boy Scouts of America after they dismissed him in 1990...
Bring on the Junk Food: Hungering to Get in on the Fast-Growing Snack Business, Philip Morris Adds Nabisco to Its Pantry
When Philip Morris agreed to pay nearly $15 billion for Nabisco Holdings last week, Wall Street pros were staggered by the price tag. But snack-food king Nabisco can thank diners like Andy Baze for the hefty tab. "Snack foods rock," says Baze, 29,...
CBS Tries a Dutch TV Treat: John De Mol, the Big Man Behind 'Big Brother'
John de Mol fires up another Marlboro Light and considers what we might call the Gladiator Paradigm. De Mol is the Dutch producer behind the quasi-reality show "Big Brother," set to debut on CBS this week. Ten strangers are locked in a house for 89...
Cheshire Cat, Cheddar Man: Bland Tony Blair May Have the Most Radical Agenda in British History: The End of Britain
"All right," said the [Cheshire] Cat; and this time it vanished quite slowly, beginning with the end of the tail, and ending with the grin, which remained some time after the rest of it had gone. --"Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" London--about...
Diving into Bill's Trash: Oracle Confesses to Digging for Dirt on Microsoft
If the White House were involved, we'd be calling it Mogulgate. Over the past year, Washington, D.C., lobbying firms supporting Microsoft in its antitrust battle against the Justice Department repeatedly found themselves the victims of what looked...
Giving New Meaning to 'Designer' Shoes
Look down at your sneakers. think you could do better? Test your style I.Q. at Customatix.com, which lets you design your running shoe or hiking boot starting from an all-white slate or a prefab model. The company says that users are customizing all...
Hard-Work Holidays: Here's the Idea: You Give Up Your Free Time. and You Pay for the Privilege
Margot Page felt guilty raising her kids in what she calls Seattle's "toxic" environment, where people check their stock prices several times a day. She and her husband wanted to instill in their three children core values, like "sharing their gifts,"...
In Search of Hot Rocks: Everyone Knows That Plundered Diamonds Are Helping to Fuel Civil Wars in Africa. Now the World Finally Is Planning to Do Something about It. an Inside Look at the Underground Trade
The people who stormed into rebel leader Foday Sankoh's Freetown villa on May 8 weren't conducting your usual search-and-seizure operation. Enraged by the renewal of a nine-year-old rebellion in the West African country of Sierra Leone, the crowd wanted...
'It's an Easy Shot to Take': Albright Responds-And Adapts-To Her Critics
Secretary of state Madeleine Albright sat down for a chat with NEWSWEEK's Michael Hirsh aboard her Boeing 757 last Thursday as she returned from a nine-day tour of Asia, Europe and the Middle East. Excerpts: HIRSH: Your diplomacy seems less confrontational...
Money Falling from Heaven: Everyone Has Plans for the Exploding Budget Surpluses. and the Best Policy Is: Do Nothing
We now have a curious situation in Washington. It seems to be raining money. Just the other day, the Clinton administration released new budget projections that raised the estimated surpluses over the next decade by more than $1 trillion. In February...
Much Storm, Little Drang: Despite Special Effects, Adventure Tale Soggy at Edges
Wolfgang Petersen's movie of Sebastian Junger's nonfiction best seller "The Perfect Storm" promises excitement on the high seas, and you can't say it doesn't deliver. Once the swordfishing boat Andrea Gail runs into heavy weather (about an hour into...
Now She's Not Just Listening
To mark the first anniversary of the listening tour that launched her Senate campaign, Hillary Clinton will hit the trail again this week with another upstate New York campaign swing. But this time she won't be just listening. In recent weeks, she's...
Opening the Drawer One More Time: Twenty Years Later, I Return to the Street Where I Was Abducted, and the Terror of a Night I Can't Forget
It is a warm autumn day on Q Street in Washington, D.C. Purple and yellow pansies adorn the brick sidewalk, and joggers and elderly strollers savor the midday sunshine. As I pause on the elegant oak-lined street, surrounded by apartment windows,...
Perspectives
"Today we are learning the language in which God created life." President Bill Clinton, on the completion of the human-genome map "We are very happy to be going home." Juan Miguel Gonzalez, on the end of the seven-month custody battle over his son...
Right off the Shelf: Non-Prescription Cholesterol Drugs Could Open an Era of Do-It-Yourself Medicine
The patient was well aware of her cholesterol problem when she showed up a few weeks ago to see Dr. Sidney Smith in Chapel Hill, N.C. In fact, she had already treated it. By taking Cholestin, a product based on a natural form of the cholesterol inhibitor...
That Just Ain't Cricket
While John Rocker was on his best behavior at Shea Stadium, the real pitching fits took place at what's supposed to be the most prim and proper of sporting events: Wimbledon. Anna Smashnova may not be a big name in the tennis world, but at least it's...
The Lioness in Winter: Madeleine Albright Still Takes Hits, but Thanks to Her New 'Serenity' and Low-Key Style, They Just Don't Hurt as Much
It wasn't long ago that Madeleine Albright was known as "Madame War." No one meant this as a compliment. Stern and hawk-faced, her signature Stetson pulled low over her eyes, the secretary of State seemed to be the militant in Bill Clinton's cabinet....
The Next Abortion Battle: Shifting from the Court to the Streets and the Ballot Box
Dr. Leroy Carhart won a victory in the Supreme Court last week. Carhart, a retired Air Force surgeon who does abortions in Bellevue, Neb., sued to overturn the state's law banning so-called partial-birth abortions, and the justices agreed with him....
The Outlaw Strikes Again: The Adman Who Sold Jesse Ventura as an Action Figure May Now Try to Spruce Up Ralph Nader's Image
The guy who is arguably the most creative political pitchman of the last decade doesn't work on K Street or Madison Avenue, but in Minneapolis's warehouse district, above a pizza joint and a bakery. Bill Hillsman's ads are legendary--like the one where...
The Real Stakes in November: The Supreme Court Is Just the Beginning. Why This Seemingly Ho-Hum Race Actually Matters
To listen to Ralph Nader, Pat Buchanan and much of the press, Al Gore and George W. Bush could almost run on the same ticket. when it comes to economics, the differences are hard to find, read the headline on a lead story in USA Today last week. Even...
The Return of Harry Potter! Exclusive: J. K. Rowling Talks about Her Success, Her Daughter, Her Readers, the Upcoming Film and, of Course, Harry Potter, Teen Wizard
Months before its official debut on July 8, J. K. Rowling's fourth Harry Potter novel had become the biggest publishing phenomenon since--ever. There has never been a bigger first printing (3.8 million in this country alone). Nor a book that's sold...
The Sourpuss We Loved: WALTER MATTHAU, 1920-2000
HE WAS A CROSS BETWEEN W. C. Fields and a bloodhound, poured into a stooped, 6-foot-3 frame. No Hollywood leading man has ever looked or sounded or shuffled like Walter Matthau: out of that craggy sourpuss face, with its seen-it-all eyes, came a growl...
The Supreme Question: Abortion, Gays, Prayer, Parochial Schools, Criminal Rights-In One Close Call after Another, the High Court's Dramatic Rulings Altered the Landscape. Inside a Divided Court, and How the Next President Will Shape It
Al Gore saw his opening, and he took it. Campaigning last Wednesday in Backlick, Ohio, the vice president unexpectedly tossed aside the top of a scheduled speech about energy and the environment and instead launched into a passionate lecture about...
Touring Muslim Style: Rules of the Road for Visits to Islamic Countries
The sweet-faced museum guard in Damascus was bewildered. "Why," he asked, "don't Americans come to Syria?" I gave him the polite answer: that it seems far away and foreign, and that they probably didn't know about the great Crusader castles, the Jewish...
What Boys Really Want: A Controversial New Book Argues That Girls Are Flourishing While Boys Are Overlooked and at Risk
All that stuff you've heard about how girls are ignored and oppressed and boys get all the attention in school? It's just a "myth," says philosopher Christina Hoff Sommers in her new book, "The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism Is Harming Our...
Why Flying Is So Awful: Bad Weather, Bad Service and Crowded Flights Have Made This a Grim Season. and There's Little Hope the Ride's Going to Get Smoother
Believe it or not, airlines really are trying to do better. They promised to improve customer service last year under pressure from a Congress fed up with stories of nightmare flights. And last week the inspector general of the U.S. Transportation...
Young Wonder from Down Under: The Redcoats Are Coming-And So Is Heath Ledger. an Aussie Heartthrob Explodes in 'The Patriot.'
It was a storybook moment--or at least it was meant to be. A young Australian actor, so broke he's been bumming money off his agent, finally snags an audition that could jump-start his career. And, man, does he screw it up. "I had two scenes prepared,"...