Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 29

A Confession from Jesse: Spurred by the Tabs, Jackson Admits an Indiscretion
Jesse Jackson's associates call it the "come-to-Jesus meeting." It was winter, two years ago, and the civil-rights leader was holed up with his wife and children in their South Side Chicago home for a tense family conference. The subject: Jackson's...
A Pol Feels the Heat: Inside Gray Davis's Battle to Get the Power Back On-And Recharge His Own Career before It's Too Late
Even before a deranged man plowed his big rig into the state capitol last Tuesday, California Gov. Gray Davis wasn't having a good week. With his state's power supplies dwindling, Davis spent a frantic day in Washington, D.C., pleading for federal...
A Rock 'N' Jock Halftime
Can MTV actually make the Super Bowl halftime show interesting? For years, America's been treated to middle-of-the-road performers backed by pyrotechnics spectaculars. But this year, in a bit of corporate synergy, CBS is letting its hipper little sister...
A Strategy for the Wilderness: To Find Their Way Back to Power, Democrats Need to Tack Hard to the Middle of the Road
Bill Clinton cast a strange shadow over George W. Bush's Inaugural, much as the Iranians did by releasing the American hostages on the very day Ronald Reagan took office 20 years ago. It wasn't entirely Clinton's fault; Independent Counsel Robert Ray...
A Tale of Twin Babies: An Adoption Gone Bad Has Caused an International Scandal-And Heartbreak for Two Anguished Families
The way the London tabloids told it, the story of how two adorable, U.S.-born infant girls got to Britain was a shocking tale of baby-selling on the Internet--even Tony Blair got into the act, saying he found this type of e-commerce "absolutely deplorable."...
Being a 'Black Leader' in America: Why Jesse Jackson's Crisis over a Child He Fathered out of Wedlock Has Few Implications beyond the Personal
Jesse Jackson's bounteous gifts and abundant weaknesses have always been on full display: his soul-stirring rhetoric, his irrepressible passion, along with an unquenchable hunger for attention--from the camera, the crowd and, notcoincidentally, the...
Bring It On: Were the Years of Flute, Piano, Violin, Dance, Tennis, Basketball, Soccer and Even Astronomy Worth All the Hassles? Yes, Says This High-School Senior
When I was 4, my parents signed me up for Saturday-morning enrichment classes at Northwestern University. I took astronomy, poetry, literature and philosophy. Sometimes I was frustrated, because I felt my parents were making me do something that cut...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Software for a Song Looking for something to liven up the office? Try bird song. Ramphastos's birding software (www.ramphastos.com) lets you practice identifying your fine feathered friends while you're stuck indoors. You can search for...
Death of a Dictator: Laurent Kabila Promised Hope and Brought Misery. in His Assassination, Some See a Chance for Peace
The cream-colored Marble Palace is a typically grandiose relic of the former Congolese dictator, Mobutu Sese Seko. Guards in blue tunics and plumed helmets are posted out front, and the interior is adorned with enormous mirrors and overstuffed Louis...
Dolly Sings It Back Home: Parton Pays Homage to Her Smoky Mountain Roots
It's not hard to feel like a wallflower next to the wildly vivid Dolly Parton. Even as the 55-year-old singer relaxes on the satin couch of her marble and gold Manhattan hotel room, she simply oozes fabulousness. Parton fills the room with larger-than-life...
'I Will Work to Build A Single Nation': Restoration: With a Solemn Speech, George W. Bush Ends the Age of Clinton. He's Striking the Right Notes, but Still Faces a Divided Nation
As George W. Bush gazed down the Mall at the thousands of Americans who had come to see him inaugurated, he tried not to look at his father. He knew that the elder Bush was bound to "become emotional," as the younger Bush had put it a few days before,...
Landlord, Expert on Human Behavior? after 15 Years in the Business, I've Seen Tenants Do Just about Everything. but I'd Bet I Haven't Seen It All
I had to phone the sheriff after I got the call about a basketball-size bag of marijuana that our new tenant found in a house we offer for rent. It evidently had been forgotten by the person who had lived there before. The incoming tenant called me...
Lights Out: Thanks to Emergency Steps, the Power Is Back on in the West. but There Is Growing Concern That California's Energy Crisis Will Short-Circuit the Nation's Already Slowing Economy
The 3,700 students at Fontana High School, about 50 miles east of Los Angeles, got a crash course in the economics of power deregulation last week as they sat in darkened classrooms, huddling in blankets, jackets, hats and gloves. The Fontana school...
Mail Call
Getting Personal With Oprah We were gratified that Oprah fans liked our cover story. "My O, my O, what a great article and cover picture!" exulted one. Why is the queen of talk so beloved? "Hers is a much-needed voice in this world," a reader declared....
Not Your Father's NFL: Bored with Football? Check out the XFL's Big Hits, Rowdy Fans And-Of Course-Cheerleaders
When fans envision the XFL, the new football league conjured up by Vince McMahon and his rude, crude World Wrestling Federation, here's what they picture: it's third down, 10 yards to go and "The Rock" catapults off the back of a teammate and fells...
One Ring to Lure Them All: Christmas 2001: Tolkien Goes Hollywood. Already Fans Hope for the Best, Brace for the Worst
In this Manhattan movie house, at 10:30 a.m., you can tell who isn't here to watch Kevin Costner handle the Cuban missile crisis in "Thirteen Days." You, sir, with the tattoos and the FRODO LIVES! T shirt? Bet you came to see the trailer for "The Lord...
People Power II: Fourteen Years after Marcos, Protesters Topple Another Hated President. A Rogue's Fall-And a Nation's Future
At noon on Saturday, Joseph Estrada was holed up in the palm-fringed oasis of Malacanang Palace, clinging to his last illusion of power. Real power had already slipped out of the Filipino president's grasp after a tumultuous impeachment trial. It wasn't...
Periscope
ASHCROFT A Sharp Right Turn at Justice If liberals are nervous about John Ashcroft's conservative views now, wait until they see his future staff. While the attorney general-designate tried to smooth his ideological edges during his confirmation hearings...
Perspectives
"Mr. President--it's got a nice ring to it." George W. Bush, before taking the oath of office and becoming the nation's 43d president "You wonder when you leave the White House if you'll ever draw a crowd again." Former president Bill Clinton, during...
Searching for the God Within: The Way Our Brains Are Wired May Explain the Origin and Power of Religious Beliefs
He begins the way he begins every meditation session, lighting candles and jasmine incense before settling into a lotus position. He focuses inward, willing the essence he regards as his true self to break free from his desires, worries and senses....
Singing Praise to the Crazed: Administrations Change, but Advocates Keep Trying to Change the World. and Succeeding
To lead a national advocacy organization requires a robust constitution and a thick skin. Long hours, hate mail, public opprobrium: it all comes with the job. At best, your work is referred to as "narrow special interests." At worst, in the words of...
Stop Stressing Me: For a Growing Number of Kids, the Whirlwind of Activities Can Be Overwhelming. How to Spot Burnout
As captain of the junior-varsity volleyball team, first-chair flute in the school orchestra, a top player on the tennis team and an honors student with three hours of homework a night, Andrea Galambos, who was also taking singing and art classes after...
The American Energy Fantasy: The California Power Crisis Is a Product of Our Unwillingness to Face Some Unpleasant Choices
The power crisis in California--rolling black-outs, two huge utilities verging on bankruptcy--is a fitting commentary on U.S. "energy policy." We Americans want it all: endless and secure energy supplies; low prices; no pollution; less global warming;...
The Parent Trap: Raising Children Today Is like Competing in a Triathlon with No Finish Line in Sight. Days Are Filled with a Mad Scramble of Sports, Music Lessons, Prep Courses and Battles over Homework. We Only Want What's Best for Them, but Our Kids May Not Be Better Off
All Fall, Suzanne Upton of Ann Arbor, Mich., struggled to manage her children's demanding schedule: homework plus soccer and hockey for Sam, 9, and piano, soccer and ballet for Annie, 7. It wasn't easy, especially with Sam's required practices--three...
The Skin-Cancer Scare: The Lesion on Bill Clinton's Back Was Easily Cured, but It Offers a Stark Reminder of the Sun's Hazards
"The president has cancer" is always an arresting phrase. But by the time we got confirmation of Bill Clinton's case last week, he had already been cured. Doctors scraped a suspicious lesion from the president's back during his annual physical Jan....
The Steel Behind the Smile: Laura's the 'Un-Hillary,' but Will Be a Force
"Have a seat!" Laura Bush said in her best librarian's voice when the standing ovation lingered last Friday. Normally a pre-Inaugural event honors the new First Lady, but the bookish 54-year-old, whose Secret Service code name in the campaign was "Teacher,"...
Thinkin' about Tomorrow: Final Days: Bill's Finale Was Clinton-Esque-Full of Lawyers, a Specter of Scandal and a Blast of Payback
It ended much as it began, in a last-minute frenzy to get things done. Eight years ago, President-elect Bill Clinton, worried his Inaugural Address wasn't ready for prime time, stayed up most of the night rehearsing and revising. Red-eyed and puffy-faced,...
Where's the Beef? It's Been a Rough Trip to the Screen for 'Hannibal.' Now Fans Better Be Ready for a Kinder Cannibal
What was scarier in "The Silence of the Lambs": Anthony Hopkins strapped into his grotesque face mask--or without it, his teeth ready to tear into a succulent chunk of human flesh? Either way, for a decade moviegoers have been hungering for the return...