Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 26

A Bad Case of 'Mad Dow' Disease: The Markets May Seem Hazardous to Your Health, but for Long-Term Investors, the Diagnosis Is Actually Much Improved
The stock-market drop is finally getting nasty. The contagion, which had been confined to the Nasdaq market and its high-priced technology stocks, leaped the species barrier last week and infected blue-chip financial and manufacturing issues. Think...
A Different Kind of War: NATO's Arrayed against the Ethnic Albanians It Went into Kosovo to Protect-And the Aim of Many Guerrillas Is Not So Much Independence as Organized Crime
As Suleyman Ramadani opened his garage door in downtown Tetovo last week, a sniper's bullet pierced his forehead. Like the mortar shells that have rained on this Macedonian city for days, the sniper rounds came from the hills above the city. For much...
Bin Laden's Poetry of Terror: New FBI Evidence Links Saudi Militant to the Cole Blast
It was a family affair. In the wilds of southern Afghanistan, Osama bin Laden was throwing a lavish wedding celebration for his son Mohammed. Relatives flew in from all over the world for last month's banquet. But when Bin Laden stood up to address...
Briefcase
LONGEVITY Divine Intervention? Many studies have found that churchgoers outlive the faithless, but no one knew why until now. A study in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine suggests that worshipers simply take better care of themselves. Researchers...
Culture Club: Birds Do It, Chimps Do It, Whales Do It: Engage in Rituals and Pass on Traditions about How They Eat, Greet, Use Tools, Even Dance
In the Gulf of Maine, one group of humpback whales has added its own personal touch to the species' usual "bubble cloud" feeding routine. While other humpbacks exhale mightily underwater in order to envelop schools of prey in clouds of bubbles that...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY A Hula Hoop for The New Millennium Pity the poor Hula Hoop in this modern age. What possible chance could a simple vinyl hoop have against the lure of videogames, television shows and snazzy Web sites for kids? To neutralize those digital...
Desperate Hours: The Blast Claimed 17 Lives and Crippled a Destroyer. the Inside Story of the Heroic Bid to Save the USS Cole
Deborah Courtney wanted to sail on a warship after she graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1990. It took a while: Courtney had to bide her time as an admiral's aide until the rules barring women from combat duty were changed in 1994. Finally given...
Friendly Infections: You've Heard That There's 'Good' Cholesterol. Now, How about Beneficial Bacteria? Cultivating These Microbes Can Have a Wide Range of Health Advantages
Ah, Spring. Snow melts, the wind gusts and pills rattle in my purse. It's the same story every year. My tenacious winter cold spawns a sinus infection, or my sore throat has turned to tonsillitis. By late March I've nettled my doctor into a round of...
Mail Call
A Spy Who Tricked the FBI Readers were deeply disturbed by the revelations in our cover story about accused spy Robert Hanssen. "It's shocking to learn that a trusted member of an inner circle has become a traitor to everything we believe," wrote...
Mir Takes Its Last Lap: After Orbiting Earth for 15 Years, the Russian Space Station Prepares for a Fiery Plunge into the Pacific
If you happen to be sailing in the South Pacific early Thursday morning, watch for a bright flash--then dive for cover. That flash will be the dying gasp of the Russian space station Mir, scheduled to plummet to Earth this week. Mission controllers...
Newsmakers
The Aging Immortal Since Michael Jordan hung up his Nikes in 1999, the Air's gotten heavier--too big, in fact, for his Hanes tightie whities. Now he's slimming down by ruling the courts at a local gym, sparking rampant speculation that he's tired...
Periscope
FOOT AND MOUTH Taking Steps Against the Threat The Agriculture Department's SWAT team of meat-sniffing beagles has gotten lots of media attention. But behind the scenes, government officials worry that the USDA's effort to protect American livestock...
Perspectives
"Our economy is beginning to sputter." President George W. Bush, while stumping for his tax-cut plan in New Jersey "[This] started when Dick Cheney, a few months back, said we're in a recession... I mean, we've been talking ourselves into this."...
Political Correctness Has Passed Me By: 'Chrome Dome,' 'Shiny'. I Hear Them All. but like My Hero Captain Picard, I'm Wearing Baldness with Style
Once upon a time, I had thick, wavy hair. Brown and long and naturally curly at the ends, my hair defined me. Part late-series Peter Brady, part "Help"-era John Lennon, I was known not so much for the stylishness of my coiffure as for the prodigious...
Puffy Dodges a Bullet: The Rap Mogul Has Long Embraced a Gangster Image. Now, Shaken by a Difficult Trial, He May Clean Up His Act
One July afternoon in 1998, Sean (Puffy) Combs retreated to his stylish Park Avenue townhouse for a respite from the exciting frenzy that was enveloping his life--the result of his having suddenly become the world's first hip-hop uber-celebrity. He...
Rough Seas for McCain
We know that we're in open waters," says Sen. John McCain. As the old Navy pilot went to St. John's College in Annapolis, Md., last Friday for a final town meeting to rev up support for his campaign finance reform bill before the Senate takes it up...
RUSSIA: A Gorby Celebration
When Mikhail Gorbachev turned 70 earlier this month, his admirers honored him with a series of high-profile concerts, public discussions and parties. TV shows, magazine cover stories and newspaper interviews re-examined his legacy. In a poll published...
Show Us the Money: America Needs the World's Cash
Americans have always wondered just how much the rest of the world really loves them. Well, we're about to find out. As the U.S. economy slows, foreigners will have to decide whether they want to keep investing their money in American stocks and bonds....
SPORTS: Michelle's Next Turn: Skating's Princess Tries to Hold on to Her Crown
Elegant even in her practice uniform of basic black, Michelle Kwan flashes across the ice with energy and grace. Despite the early hour and an audience of just three people, she floats through each jump; her glide is sublime, and she invests every...
State of the Art: It's the Age of Museums-Not the Musty Kind, but Ultramodern Showplaces That Are Betting on Big on Marketing Culture to Middle America
As a glacial wind whipped off Lake Michigan, architect Santiago Calatrava side-stepped the ice-skimmed mud puddles to inspect his breathtaking new addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum. Even unfinished, with building cranes still hovering, the structure...
Tax Cuts under the Knife; by Howard Fineman: How the Market Drop May Force W to Operate on His Best-Laid Plans
The inner sanctum of the Treasury Building is decorated with artifacts of the government's role in commerce: 19th-century bonds, brass weights and measures, greenbacks in lofty denominations. In his private dining room, Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill...
Thanks Ever So Much, President Poor-Mouth: Bush Pays the Price for an Unusual Decision to Speak Ill of the Economy
Be afraid, be very afraid. That has been the message of President George W. Bush and his economic team ever since December, when they realized that for the first time in 112 years they couldn't use the normal argument of new presidents to push their...
The Dangerous Desk: Mouse-Clicking Isn't Heavy Lifting, but It Can Cause Injury. How to Keep Your Job from Immobilizing You
Howard Egerman often feels as though a nail is piercing his hand. He sleeps fitfully at night. He struggles with such simple tasks as changing a light bulb. Egerman, 54, suffers from bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. He developed the ailment after...
The Problem of the Megaschool: In the Crowded Halls of Enormous High Schools, Some Students Are Sure to Get Lost in the Shuffle
My high school graduating class had 175 students. Last year the same school had 420 seniors. This bit of biographical data comes to you by way of Charles Andrew Williams. He's the latest teenager to become a national bogeyman after being charged with...
Weathering the Storm: After One of the Worst Weeks Ever for Stocks, Hopes for a Quick Economic Recovery Are Fading. What Consumers Do Next Could Cause-Or Avert-A Recession
Ralph Caria sure knows how to ruin his lunch hour. There was nothing wrong with the Chinese food Caria, a 44-year-old HMO claims specialist, munched on at a suburban Boston shopping mall last week. But his mood soured when he checked in on the stock...
What If Washington's Tool Kit Won't Work? the Dangers Facing Greenspan & Co. as They Try to Fix What's Wrong
We will soon learn whether the economy operates by the textbook. As the stock market falters, Washington is making the standard antirecessionary moves. In 2001 the Federal Reserve has already reduced short-term interest rates by 1 percentage point....
Where There's Smoke. Corporate America Poured a Ton of Money into Bush's Coffers. Now It's Payback Time Inside the Beltway
Few business leaders worked harder to see George W. Bush elected president than his old Yale classmate Thomas Kuhn. As chief of the Edison Electric Institute, the lobbying arm of the electric-utility industry, Kuhn led a parade of corporate trade groups...