Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 4

A Plot to Foil the Greens: How Political Muscle and Clever Legal Footwork Won a Quiet Federal 'Review' of Antipollution Lawsuits
Only two weeks ago the mood of the Justice Department's environmental lawyers was upbeat. They had just won another big victory--a court-ordered decree forcing Marathon Ashland Petroleum to spend $265 million to install up-to-date pollution-control...
A Town's Two Faces: Struggling with the Pain of Change, Rogers, Arkansas-Yes, Arkansas-Is a Testing Ground for Hispanic Growth in America
John Sampier first noticed his community's changing complexion on a balmy autumn day on the soccer field in 1994. The then mayor of Rogers, Ark., asked a coach if the Latino players gracefully kicking the ball around were a traveling team. No, the...
A Year in the Life: Three Novices Talk about What It's like at the Head of the Class-And Why Teaching Is the Hardest Job to Love
The statistics should scare every parent. The nation's public schools will need 2 million new teachers in the next decade, according to a recent government report. It'll be tough to recruit them and even tougher to keep them in the classroom. More...
Breaking Up Is (Still) Hard to Do: AT&T Has Got That Itch Again-But Is It in Shareholders' Best Interests for the Company to Scratch It for the Third Time in a Generation?
The best way to make money off AT&T since it announced its first breakup in 1982 may be to have won its printing contract rather than owning its stock. The company has sacrificed entire forests to produce the hundreds of pages of legalese that...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Coming Soon(ish) to a Gamer Near You Hundreds of games were on display at the recent electronic entertainment Expo, held in Los Angeles. Though most of them won't appear in stores for months, we're giving a sneak peek at the five most...
Kobe: Thanks for Sharing: How Bryant Saw the Light and Sent the Lakers Surging
Kobe Bryant never imagined that watching his Los Angeles Lakers win could be so humbling. But confined to the bench with an ankle injury for a couple of weeks in March, Kobe couldn't kid himself: the defending NBA champion Lakers were clearly playing...
MUSIC: It's in the 'Air': French Pop Never Sounded This Good: Move over, Moby, and Tell Fatboy the News
For the last half of the 20th century, one of the worst insults you could hurl at a rock or pop band was to say they had that "French" sound. The otherwise cultured nation was as synonymous with bad music as England once was with taste-free cuisine....
Newsmakers
Will They Take the Rap? The first hip-hop summit, in 1996, was called to stop the bicoastal bloodshed in the East Coast-West Coast hip-hop feud that claimed the lives of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. Next month there'll be a hip-hop summit...
On the Brink: Are You Vulnerable? Overexposed: Too Much Debt? Financial Catastrophe Could Be Just One Single Unpleasant Surprise Away
Many of us have a good feel for our monthly income and routine expenses. But when it comes to the stuff that comes due less frequently, our intuition--or maybe just our memory--fails us. Suddenly the six-month auto-insurance bill appears, that much-needed...
Our Man in Venice: Can U.S. Sculptor Robert Gober's Show at the Art World's 'Oscars' Take Him to the Top?
The sculptor Robert Gober is the sole U.S. representative at this year's edition of the art world's equivalent of the Oscars, the Venice Biennale. (It runs from June 10 to Nov. 4.) Being asked to occupy the American Pavilion--a nice little brick neoclassical...
Peeling Apart: Facing Falling Sales and Legal Jeopardy, Ford Splits with Firestone and Orders a Big Tire Change
The confrontation began as soon as the executives from both companies filed into the conference room at Firestone headquarters last Monday. Why, Firestone CEO John Lampe demanded, had Ford been leaking damaging information to the press about Firestone...
Periscope
FUND-RAISING Raining on the GOP's Cash Parade Republican National Committee officials trumpeted last week's round of Washington fund-raisers--attended by hundreds of wealthy contributors--as a smashing success, saying the gala raked in $23.9 million,...
Perspectives
"Vermont has long been known for its independence." Jim Jeffords, the newly independent Vermont senator, announcing his departure from the Republican Party "We contemplated [naming him] king of the Senate, but we don't have that position yet." Assistant...
Playing It Too Safe?
You've done all the right things. You funded your retirement as much as you could while still sending your 1.9 kids to college. You lived within your budget, even though it meant missing out on Monte Carlo. Now you've made it to the age of 60. The...
So Much for Civics Class: When All That Really Matters Is the Committee Assignments, Democracy's in Big, Big Trouble
When the good-old-days crowd get together over coffee in a diner, at the card table at home, one of the things they sometimes bemoan is the end of civics class in school. You remember civics: a kid with no more interest in the tripartite system of...
The Odyssey of 'Jeezum Jim': For Years Jim Jeffords Watched the GOP Drift to the Right, and Now He's Had Enough. the Unlikely Rebel Whose Socks Don't Match-But Who's Rocking the Capital
He woke up screaming in the middle of the night, yelling to his wife: "Watch out! The machine guns are firing!" Jim Jeffords's nightmare then was about impeachment. As a friend of Bill Clinton's, he was tormented by his duty to sit in judgment of the...
The Politics of Post-Affluence: Tony Blair's Winning Formula in Britain: Half Alan Greenspan, Half Oprah Winfrey
It's been a rough election season for Britain's ruling Labour Party. On the day that it released its campaign manifesto, televisions were buzzing with a more vivid image: Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott punching out a protester who had thrown an...
The Sharper Image: Picture Quality Is Up, Prices Are Down. There Hasn't Been a Better Time to Dive into Digital Photography
Francine Schwartz, 54, may be the perfect candidate for a new digital camera. She's comfortable with her computer and she understands the advantages of digital photography, having watched her husband, Martin, fiddle with his four filmless cameras over...
The Steel Behind the Smile: Daschle Knows All about Operating with Tight Margins
When Tom Daschle first came to Capitol Hill as a congressman in 1979, his colleagues teasingly called him "Landslide." He'd been declared the winner in South Dakota by 14 votes; it took a full year for the state Supreme Court to certify the election....
To Bail Is to Fail: Stick with Stocks: Portfolio: Since 1926 the Market Has Returned an Annual Average of 11 Percent. and You Want T-Bills?
Here's how the Federal Reserve describes the stock-market outlook: "Investment in capital equipment... has continued to decline. The erosion in current and prospective profitability, in combination with considerable uncertainty about the business outlook,...
Trying on a New 'Sweater': Weezer Came Undone. Now It's Dressed for Success
It's late on a Friday in April when Rivers Cuomo calls. His band, Weezer, is about to put out a much-anticipated new album--its first in five years--and so this seems like the natural thing to discuss. But Cuomo's got a different agenda. He needs some...
What Bush Needs to Learn: How Did the White House Lose This One? and Will the Defection Force Dubya to Alter His Game Plan? the Hard Lessons for a President Who's Been Burned
It was the kind of invitation Andy Card probably should have issued earlier. Last Monday the White House chief of staff called Sen. John McCain. Would he like to dine--alone--with the president the following Thursday? McCain accepted. But by Wednesday...
Your Job: CEO of You, Inc. the Motley Fool Says: If Your Financial Health Is in Doubt, Be More Businesslike
Something happens to otherwise sober writers when the subject at hand is the financial health of the American household. You've read these articles. Some start with the wrenching tale of one person's via dolorosa, ending in joblessness, worthless stockholdings...
You've Got Mail, but How about Romance? We Can Send Messages with the Click of a Mouse, but I Say Nothing Beats the Fun of the Old-Fashioned Letter
When is the last time you found a letter in your mailbox? Not the false intimacy of a sweepstakes offer or a chatty update from your local congressman, but an actual letter written just to you. If you're like most of us, it's been a long, long while....